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Removing dried weatherstrip adhesive

890 Views 35 Replies 18 Participants Last post by  kenash
As my title implies, what are house guys finding that removes old dried weatherstrip adhesive? I'm hoping can remove it without too much underlying paint damage. Thanks for any suggestions
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XKE?
 

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Nice. I have an Elan. A Super Seven. An XK8. And a Dunstall Norton. I get the English thing too!
 
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I recently did all of my door weatherstripping and the only product that would put a dent in the original adhesive was the red can of 3m. Don’t buy the white “special purpose” version as that will eat the paint and dull it. I used a combination of blue paper shop towels, a plastic wire brush, and a plastic scraper and I was able to get it pretty much spotless. It’s not easy though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Nice. I have an Elan. A Super Seven. An XK8. And a Dunstall Norton. I get the English thing too!
Coincidentally, my E's has an XK grandchild, an '08 XK-R Cvt. (Portfolio series).....have a number of vintage bikes too! My favorites; a '65 250 PUCH, '63 Baby Benly (Dream's little brother), plus assorted Vespas and other little guys. etc. Do you know of the Janus line?

The Supers were formidable track competitors.

Funny, we tend to get derailed.......we be "brothers of the corn"
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Update to removing old dried weather strip adhesive.....
Well folks, it seems that soaking (overnight) using strips of paper towels wetted with 3M General Purpose Adhesive remover is the secret. After which, a plastic scraper and VAC lifted off the gummy residue. However, too long and you'll remove paint LOL! Couldn't find my Kerosene as was mentioned, so, couldn't test it. The 3M is a bit "smelly".
I'll clean it all again with alcohol and start all over again with weather strip adhesive.
If weren't for the fact, it would add thickness to the gasket, I wonder if velcro would work.:unsure: I see a "crack'n peel" gasket invention here..... Hood Motor vehicle Automotive tire Vehicle Automotive exterior
 

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That Janus is very cool. That's a modern bike?

Here is my Dunstall. It was bought new from Paul Dunstall in the UK by my Dad's friend. He rode it around the UK for a summer then had it shipped back here. He stored it in my Dad's garage and paid me to polish it when I was a kid. I bought it from him in about 1988.
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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
That Janus is very cool. That's a modern bike?

Here is my Dunstall. It was bought new from Paul Dunstall in the UK by my Dad's friend. He rode it around the UK for a summer then had it shipped back here. He stored it in my Dad's garage and paid me to polish it when I was a kid. I bought it from him in about 1988.
View attachment 878666
What size is it? I'll have to research them. Looks in terrific shape for its age. The Janus Motorcycle company is a small company that custom designs and build their own. They started building the Halcyon Model 50 cc series in the late 2000s and discontinued them in 2014-15 and only built 50 of them. They transitioned to 250cc and now are building 450 models with EFI. The 250s and 450s are EPA certified. They use only local craftsman, including the Amish. However, they do import and use the Honda brand engine. They are located in Goshen, IN. These little 50s are "water cooled" 2 cycles and make almost 10 hp., road speed is about 60-65, depending on how fat your butt is LOL! But, with a few upgrades, is capable of 10-12 mph more. Janus caters to to the small bike crowd that likes to "tinker" with their own and has a great support network for when thinks go wrong.
We need to start our own thread, I'll salvage it, I highly recommend the "3M General Purpose Adhesive Remover" if an d when you need to remove any motorbike weather strip LOL😂
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
I'm gunna try a pinstripe removal disc the next time I've gotta do this.
Yeah, I looked at those too. However, I'm dealing with a 3/4 W x 3/8 deep channel and I'm not sure I can get into it with those. My "plan b" is a rotary nylon brush in a 120 grit or higher.
However, as it turns out, after several applications of soaking paper towel strips with the 3M Adhesive cleaner, I was able to scrape 90% up with a nylon scraper. Now, I'm considering how to go back in with a new gasket. I'm going to experiment with a double sided tape that will adhere to rubber. This might be a challenge. We all know weatherstrip gasket material is most successful when it is applied to both surfaces. We all know the challenge of applying a gasket that's 60" X 3/4" with "goo" on it and not letting the gasket wiggle all over the car leaving weatherstrip adhesive in its wake. LOL!
 

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If you have to do it again, try the kerosene. Modern highway diesel is ultra low sulfur which reduces the old diesel smell to a very low level. This will also work. It is actually what I used since I keep some diesel fuel in a 5 gallon can. This method does not require waiting overnight. It dissolves it as you work it. Then you can clean the diesel fuel (or kerosene) with the de-greaser of your choice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Thanks for your follow up. I will, certainly, get some "Kero" or diesel when I change the filter in my 08 Suburban 6.5L diesel and try it.
 

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Update to removing old dried weather strip adhesive.....
Well folks, it seems that soaking (overnight) using strips of paper towels wetted with 3M General Purpose Adhesive remover is the secret. After which, a plastic scraper and VAC lifted off the gummy residue. However, too long and you'll remove paint LOL! Couldn't find my Kerosene as was mentioned, so, couldn't test it. The 3M is a bit "smelly".
I'll clean it all again with alcohol and start all over again with weather strip adhesive.
If weren't for the fact, it would add thickness to the gasket, I wonder if velcro would work.:unsure: I see a "crack'n peel" gasket invention here..... View attachment 878663
Alcohol is OK on a factory paint job. If your car has been re-painted, DON'T use alcohol. It'll eat the paint.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Alcohol is OK on a factory paint job. If your car has been re-painted, DON'T use alcohol. It'll eat the paint.
Thanks for your reply. As it turned out, I soaked (3M General Adhesive remover) the area with strips of paper towels. After which, I used a nylon scraper and Vacuum . It took a couple of applications, but, it did a good job and didn't attack the paint. This paint is a little 50 years. LOL!
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