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Is it just me or is there way to many welds holding this thing together? I am removing the panel to allow me beter acess to the P/S side cowl panel and firewall since I need to cut out parts of both to weld in new patch panels. No matter how I try to be careful I keep either drilling to deep into the welds or I don't get all of the weld and end up tearing up the panel around the weld with the air chisel. ARRRRGGGGG!
 

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Just say no to air chisels-that is a sure way to cause grief. There are a ton of spot welds and even possibly some brazing at the windshield posts. Use spotweld cutters to cut the spot welds, not a regular drill bit or you will drill too far a lot. You can get these bits from local tool distributors like SnapOn or Mac, or from here http://www.eastwoodcompany.com/cgi-bin/sgdynamo.exe?HTNAME=default2.htm .
Good luck.
 

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After cutting the welds with a spot weld cutter drill bit, I used an old flat wide blade butter knife to split the rest of the weld apart - just slide it in, and hit the back of the knife with a hammer - splits the weld apart without damaging the metal like a air chisel does.

J.B.
 
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If you're not using a spot weld cutter, I'd suggest you get one. They are much more controllable than a regular twist drill bit. My technique is much like JB's. I cut into the weld and use a thin blade to pry around the weld. If it's not cut enough, I drill a little more. It's tedious, but saves the metal underneath for rewelding the cowl. Using the air chisel you run a big risk of bending up the cowl or sheet metal underneath, and you'll have to straighten it all out when you put the cowl back. There are lots and lots of welds, just keep cutting.
 

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When removing my cowl for repairs, I found that a good sharp 1/2" wood chisel worked well to separate any residual metal after using the spot weld cutter (for all 130-140 spots). Of course, its hard on the chisel, but wood chisels tend to have thinner blades and work well with the thin metal. Obviously, it has to be sharpened more often than woodwork.
 
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