Vintage Mustang Forums banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Some years ago a large piece of metal was in the roadway late at night... was either hit it or tag the car in the next lane. I chose the piece of metal. I jacked up the passenger side fender, luckily stopping just before the door. But since then this eyesore makes me sick every time i see it. Im at a point where can get it fixed. Do i get a new repo fender or do you think a body shop can fix it? Two concerns i have... new fender fitting issues, which im not super concerned about lines being perfectly straight, or for the body shop if they can get the mustang detail line to where it matches rest of the car. Whats your take?
 

Attachments

·
Dimples
Joined
·
3,463 Posts
I'm no professional body man or anything, but that looks like a replacement job to me. That crease is right on the body line, which would need to be basically rebuilt. If I was hell-bent on saving that fender, I would buy a replacement and section out that part as a partial replacement panel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,270 Posts
I would replace it. A really good metal finisher could probably straighten it, but the hours invested would exceed the cost of a replacement OE fender. I can also say that because I have a great source for OE parts less than 10 minutes from my house. I can only assume that this is a '66 and you live somewhere in California. If you are in SoCal, I might be able to help you locate one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,632 Posts
After hanging aftermarket fenders and dealing with the fitment issues, and assuming it's not rusty, I'd repair that fender all day long. A good body 'person' could patch that fender in no time flat- well under the cost of a replacement fender and it's alignment time. Rick's got some really decent fenders now, but they all still require tweaking and modifying to some extent to fit as well as an original. That said- I guess I'm also assuming you've got a good fitting original now. If not, hang a repop and move on..... lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,948 Posts
Take it to a shop that specializes in old Mustangs or at least old cars of the same era and ask their opinion.

OE fenders are much thicker metal and the curve where they meet the cowl vent works - whereas on the repos (at least all the ones I've ever seen) that curve does NOT work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,739 Posts
I have some rust in the same area, but below the body line. I believe an experienced body tech can cut and weld a panel there relatively easy because it's flat. I plan to have my fender fixed, and I am sure yours can be fixed as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Currently this original fender fits pretty well... lines up decently. Not spectacular but decent. I have watched videos and read a few issues about fitting a repop fender, as originally said im not super concerned about it being perfectly straight, its 50 years old i dont mind her having some swagger. Kinda hard to find anybody anymore that specializes in classic car body repair but can always try and get an opinion.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,559 Posts
After hanging aftermarket fenders and dealing with the fitment issues, and assuming it's not rusty, I'd repair that fender all day long.
I agree, repair it absolutely. Any decent metal work/welder could fix that right up. Worth it just to avoid the aggravation and labor to get a repop to fit. :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,175 Posts
I am going to say replace with OE fender....but only because of the location of the crease...on the other side of that is the alignment bracket, so not only do you have the difficult bodywork(tricky but far from impossible) but the alignment bracket on the other side may well cause issues, which makes it easier as far as time involved(yours or someone else's) to replace with OEM. I have to replace my passenger side fender exactly because of a poor repair in the exact same area. JSHarvey is also correct...some reproduction fenders have issues with the cowl panel alignment so you are far better off finding an OE fender in salvageable condition
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,373 Posts
Long and steady beating from behind will fix that right up except the worst part of that is there is a vertical inner brace that is right behind that spot. It can be gotten to where it just needed an acceptable small amount of filler

As a DIY i'd say fix it but the cost at a shop is likely to be large because of the time it takes. If you can pop it off and carry around for an estimate you might get lucky.

Next would be a OE fender you might find for $3-350 would be fair, less would be lucky i think, sell that one for $50 to a cheap DIY guy:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
300 Posts
On a scale of 1-10 in relative difficulty to repair; that is a 1 trust me.
^^^^I would trust this guy! Look at his work...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
I used to do body and paint work - if it were my car I would rough out the damage and see how it responds.

The big challenge in restoring the part is access to the damage. If there is bracing behind the damage it makes it a bit more difficult to properly rough out the part.

I’m just getting into Mustang restoration but it seems that aftermarket sheet metal is very inexpensive.

No question, the fender is repairable.... however it’s very likely a repair of the fender by a shop will exceed the cost of replacing with aftermarket.

The decision depends on your desire to retain factory sheet metal through a repair or install aftermarket to save some dollars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Repair!

$38 bucks for the panel and an easy butt weld and refinish job. Preserves the rest of the original sheet metal and no issues with the fit of the headlight extension and door.

Never seen that before... that is rad. So im clear before head over to some metal shops and such, I purchase that and they cut/weld it in place. Then i get paint and prepped at a later date and time. Is that correct?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33,661 Posts
Never seen that before... that is rad. So im clear before head over to some metal shops and such, I purchase that and they cut/weld it in place. Then i get paint and prepped at a later date and time. Is that correct?
...or you just ask the body shop what they think about doing this vs. banging out the dent and let them buy the panel, unless they're okay with you doing it. The fender's going to have to come off anyway to properly attach the support behind it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
...or you just ask the body shop what they think about doing this vs. banging out the dent and let them buy the panel, unless they're okay with you doing it. The fender's going to have to come off anyway to properly attach the support behind it.
Being never taken off a fender before, watched and read how, but the one that is on the car now i would assume would be a easier fit back on then a new repro one.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top