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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, I'm both excited and terrified to tackle the floor pans on my 66 coupe. What is the recommended method for cutting everything out? I know that I'll need to remove the spot welds and such. I don't have a plasma cutter but I can rent one down the street. Would that be the way to go? Thanks for all the guidance so far.
 

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Don't worry, it's not too scary.
I started off with an air hacksaw & then switched to my 4" angle grinder with a very thin metal cutting disc. It cuts through very quickly and cleanly. I didn't drill the spot welds out, I just lifted the metal slightly & used a chisel.

Evan.
 

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This exactly my next task.
Yesterday at The Daytona car show
I talked with 3 different people,
all recommended without hesitation
for someone like me without a plasma
the Nibbler...cuts like butter they say.

Some angles you may have to go under the car.
This one run on air...one is also made to attach
to a drill.
http://i15.ebayimg.com/04/i/07/5e/44/f8_1_sbl.JPG
 

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Angle grinder with a thin disc works best. Best to drill out any spotwelds than to risk tearing or bending any mating surfaces up.
 

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+1 on drilling the spot welds. Chiseling can tear the spot weld off either panel, which in my case meant the wrong one, and made for additional work straightening my side cowls and frame rails when I did my toe boards. I like my 3" cut off wheel or my air body saw for most of the cutting.
 

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I imagine the job would be made much less of a struggle if you first take the bulk of the floor out in large sections. Use a saw or cut-off wheel to remove sections of the floor(just pre-plan your cuts to insure you don't cut through anything you want to keep! i.e. tunnel reinforcement, frame rails). Then, using a spot weld cutter, drill out the spot welds along the rockers, tunnel reinforcement, frame rails, etc. Finish the job up by grinding down the old welds. This method can be applied to remove most large sheet metal pieces that you don't plan on salvaging. I used it to remove the quarter panel at the factory seams on my fastback. Good luck!
 

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Spot weld cutter or proper sized drill bit to drill critical spot welds. I've also cold chiseled a few of the weaker ones. Then a saws-all to cut main sections and angle grinder for other areas.

Best to do the new Dynacorn full floor. It comes with seat risers, rear torque box tops, floor plugs, etc. all in one kit. It takes less time and less welding (less consumables) than putting in long left and right pans with having to weld that whole seam...
 

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I've used my 4 1/2" angle grinder, my air cutting wheel and my sawz all. All work well. I would only do one side at a time, rather than the entire floor pan, unless you plan to weld in some bracing. The reason for this is that the floor is part of the structural integrity of these cars. I used a weld cutter (like a mini whole saw) on the frame extensions and around the rear torque box. Other than that...it was the quick 'bulk' cutters mentioned.
 

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I'm halfway through this at the moment. Do you guys recommend cutting with no overlap or using some of the original metal to reinforce the floorpan? i was thinking a double lap of metal running the length of the floorpan would stiffen the unibody up.
 

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I'm in the middle of the same project on my '67 convertible. Of all the materials I've read, it's best to overlap the panels. Drill 3/8" holes roughly every 2 inches in the new panel where it overlaps good original steel. Perform a fill weld on the holes moving around to different areas on the panel, i.e. NOT sequentially. Practice the fill weld on scrap sheet metal first before attemting on your ride. Grind welds if needed. Good luck!
 

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I am doing this project currently as well, and am lapp welding the pans. I am screwed the two panels together every 6 inches to pull them tight, and am welding the seams on both sides, then plugging where the screws were, and grinding somewhat smooth. For me, filling the plugs is way easier than running the seam. I don't know that there would be enough strength just doing the plug welds??? Of course the whole car is plug welded togther so it might be fine.
 

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Butt welding is actually the best, but is harder to do. Overlapping large sections leaves a moisture trap of bare metal that will eventually rust.

If you support the car at the end of the rockers or torque boxes (and they are solid), cutting the whole floor out is not a problem from a structural standpoint on coupes and fastbacks. That's the only way to do a full floor replacement panel install as well...
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
So, do I have to put it up on stands to replace the floor pans? Is it possible to do it as she sits? Stands would make it easier to get to the underside (obviously) I just get a little nervous under there for some reason. Visions of my eyeballs popping out when the car lands on me I guess....I looked at the ones at Northern Tool today Link

My driveway slopes a little will it be safe if I just raise the front a bit higher than the rear?

Sorry for all the stupid questions.
 
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