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Hi everyone, hoping for some help on which cartridges I should use for my respirator. I currently have a 3M 6000/6800 series half and full face mask respirator, which seems to be pretty common. However, I am unsure which filters would be best for my application. I am doing a full restoration on a '65... including grinding, welding, blasting and eventually prime/paint. I have been using the P100 2097 filters, but that has been mostly for woodworking, and the car stuff is fairly new to me. Given all the rust and god knows what else in this car, and the work in front of me, does anyone have any recommendations of types of filter cartridges I should be using. Is their one that exists that meets all those needs, or do I need to look at getting a couple of different ones depending on the application?

My previous online searches have managed to confuse me even more than I expected. With all the cartridge options out there and the wide array of work car restoration needs, I was hoping the collective wisdom of this forum may have some suggestions.

As a side note, given all the dust/mess that blasting creates I may hire someone for that job, so that may be minor in the grand scheme of things.

Thank you!
 

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The P100 filters should be good for everything above except the paint and primer. You will need organic vapor cartridges for that. Keep in mind, that once opened they have a limited shelf life and should be stored in a sealed plastic bag when not in use. The numbers I have always heard was 8hrs of use. Don't try and save money in this area. Also make sure you do fit test to ensure you have a good seal around the mask and it is sized right
 

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Hi I am a Safety Professional. Ratlee makes some good points Look for an organic vapor cartridge with Hepa Filter combo. Keep it is a clear zip-lock bag when not in use. Make sure it's clean before and after use. Clean the mask after use with soap and water and hang dry in a clean environment.

 

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Hi I am a Safety Professional. Ratlee makes some good points Look for an organic vapor cartridge with Hepa Filter combo. Keep it is a clear zip-lock bag when not in use. Make sure it's clean before and after use. Clean the mask after use with soap and water and hang dry in a clean environment.
Thanks CSX and ratlee. I usually don't order a big pack and keep them in the house for just those reasons. Given your experience, I am curious as to which vapor cartridge filter combo would suggest. I noticed on the 3M website that they have about 8 different combo packs (https://multimedia.3m.com/mws/media/565214O/3m-cartridge-filter-guide-and-brochure.pdf). The most basic combo seems to be the 60921 for organic vapors and particulates, but it builds from there to include acid gases, ammonia methylamine, formaldehyde, sulfur, mercury, etc. The 60926 or 60923 seems to cover most things, but given this car is older than I am I don't have the slightest idea what to expect when I starting grinding and putting heat to it. Do you typically recommend a certain product code or a cartridge that protects from a specific gas/vapor?

Might be a bit of overkill on the question... just trying to do my due diligence. I tend to educate myself mostly from hindsight, which is never really ideal but especially so in the case of safety. :p
 

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Grinding and such should not release any significant vapors. For that you are looking to stop particulates. 3m has a good brochure for both automotive grinding and painting:

3m Automotive Products
 

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.... and if you are planning on using a catalyzed paint or primer that has isocyanates, the correct PPE is a supplied air respirator.
 

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The 2097 p100 filters actually filter nuisance level organic vapors and I use them for most things like welding, sanding, grinding, cutting, and spray painting. I don't smell paint fumes through them. They will be your best bet for restoration work but make sure it's "2097" as there's another model that looks the same but shouldn't be used for really anything other than sanding. I literally wear mine nearly every day I'm working on my mustang. You'll need a better filter for real paint work though, and I have a legit mask for that must don't know the cartridge type off the top of my head.
 

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Ive forgotten the "Ps" so I just remember to get the Black ones for organic vapors. i think the blacks are actually the dual maybe. Leave them out in open air for about half hour after use before storing in sealed bag. I use the disposable 1/2 masks separate chemical goggles. Then after 5-6 hours of use they become my welding or general dust masks until another mask gets demoted.
 

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The Gerson organic vapor respirators that you can actually buy at Harbor Freight are labeled for isocyanates. Not all respirators can filter out iso's if you're painting. I've used these for a long time, though if you're doing full-on sprays it's better to have a full face respirator to protect your mucus membranes. With as much spraying as I do every year, I'm going to get a Hobby Air system.
 

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I can assure you that for automotive restoration the organic vapor which covers most anything you would encounter from degreasers to paints should be suitable and hepa or particulate cartridge over the organic vapor cartridge will take care of the particulate from grinding and sanding.

Normally I use a N95 disposable respirator and for painting, I have a North full-face respirator with organic vapor and HEPA cartridges.
 
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