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Restart 289 after 12 years in garage.

850 Views 15 Replies 13 Participants Last post by  Woodchuck
Well, I'm getting very close to firing up my D code 289 after setting in my garage for 12 years. I had to remove the engine to replace some leaking freeze plugs,then decided to replace manual steering with stock P/S which took a bit of doing to find all the right parts. Thats all done now, engine back in. Need to double check all the steering tightening specs because I can't remember if I did that at the time that I put it all together. New battery.. I'm mainly concerned with initial lubrication and with gas delivery. I drained the tank and will be putting in fresh gas. Should I get rid of any residual gas in line/pump, carb, etc? Any prelube ideas for engine?
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Pull the plugs and put a couple ounces of fresh engine oil in each cylinder. Rotate the engine a couple revolutions by hand and reinstall the plugs.

Pre-fill the carburetor float bowls using a small funnel through the vent tubes.

Ideally, pull the distributor (make sure you mark the rotor location on the distributor housing and the housing location somewhere on the engine. I use a paint pen or WiteOut pen) and run the oil pump (counter clockwise) with an electric drill for about 10 seconds after oil pressure is obtained (you'll know when the drill starts "bogging"). If not an option, disconnect the coil wire from the distributor cap and ground it and crank the engine until oil pressure begins to register on the gauge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Pull the plugs and put a couple ounces of fresh engine oil in each cylinder. Rotate the engine a couple revolutions by hand and reinstall the plugs.

Pre-fill the carburetor float bowls using a small funnel through the vent tubes.

Ideally, pull the distributor (make sure you mark the rotor location on the distributor housing and the housing location somewhere on the engine. I use a paint pen or WiteOut pen) and run the oil pump (counter clockwise) with an electric drill for about 10 seconds after oil pressure is obtained (you'll know when the drill starts "bogging"). If not an option, disconnect the coil wire from the distributor cap and ground it and crank the engine until oil pressure begins to register on the gauge.
Thanks Burt. Is it obvious how to connect the drill to oil pump? Also, is it sufficient to just fill the P/S pump reservoir (separate reservoir mounter on fender inner wall)? Or should I disconnect the P/S pump belt and do that as a separate process after I get the engine going.
 

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I don't oil the cylinders, IME the piston is gonna move once or twice before the oil is splashed up there so no real harm done, and it's a great way to carbon up your rings. I'd fill the carb bowl and fire it up. Everyone does it a little different.
 

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1965 Mustang GT. 11.898 @ 113.646, all motor, three pedals
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X2 on priming the oil pump. You can use a deep 1/4” six point socket to spin the pump counterclockwise. I wrap electrical tape to stick the socket to the extension (that you’ll need). You don’t have to spin it very fast and you’ll definitely know when it builds oil pressure
 

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I prefer the "pull coil wire" and engage starter for oil priming.

I get that using a drill would be better for the engine, but TWICE I've had the oil pump shaft be jammed into the distributor so hard that the retainer spring pulled loose, and THEN despite being stuck in the distributor the shaft CAME LOOSE and fell back into the engine block before I could secure it.

One time I was able to easily retrieve the pump shaft with a small magnetic pick up tool. Once I had to pull the engine cross member and oil pan to get the shaft back. That one ended up being tougher because one of the cross member bolts broke off inside the frame nut.

Then you've got to deal with the timing issue too....so...yeah.....I don't pull the distributor unless I have to.
 

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Mine had been asleep about that long. Woodchuck’s way is how I’ve been doing wake ups for a while. It’s from the old high school auto shop days. I use Marvel Mystery Oil in the cylinders and a gas can to the inlet side of the fuel pump so any kack in the tank and lines isn’t sucked in. The important part is make sure it turns by hand before you try and fire. If it won’t turn by hand or you hear loud metal to metal take it apart and see why before attempting to fire. It could be the difference between exploding your engine and simply unseizing it and rebuilding.
 

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When I finished my car I had rebuilt the engine first and stored it in a bag for 10 years. I basically did exactly what Woodchuck said and it worked great. I’ll also add if it hasn’t been said. It’s a good idea to replace the mechanical fuel pump if it’s been sitting on there just cause that’s a long time for the diaphragm to sit dry.
 

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My 67 coupe sat for about 12 years with the occasional start up and idle for about 10-15 minutes. When I got it road worthy again (brake system, front and rear suspension replaced, new carb installed), I did the following for startup:

New battery
Drained the gas tank and fill with fresh fuel
Removed the spark plugs
Removed the coil wire and turned over the engine using the starter to get oil pressure and pump out old fuel in the line. I used a container at the carb to catch the old gas until fresh gas came out.
Replaced the fuel filter (I have the 65 canister style fuel pump)
Drained and replaced the coolant
Installed new spark plugs and wires
Changed the oil and filter

Fired it up, set timing and idle mixture screws. Check for leaks.
 

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Mine had been asleep about that long. Woodchuck’s way is how I’ve been doing wake ups for a while. It’s from the old high school auto shop days. I use Marvel Mystery Oil in the cylinders and a gas can to the inlet side of the fuel pump so any kack in the tank and lines isn’t sucked in. The important part is make sure it turns by hand before you try and fire. If it won’t turn by hand or you hear loud metal to metal take it apart and see why before attempting to fire. It could be the difference between exploding your engine and simply unseizing it and rebuilding.
I was going to suggest this.

With certain aircraft-type engines, part of starting is to crank the engine a few seconds, mags off, until oil pressure is indicated. Alternately you can pull the distributor and spin the oil drive, but then you need to get the distributor back where it was.
 

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Pull the plugs and put a couple ounces of fresh engine oil in each cylinder. Rotate the engine a couple revolutions by hand and reinstall the plugs.

Pre-fill the carburetor float bowls using a small funnel through the vent tubes.

Ideally, pull the distributor (make sure you mark the rotor location on the distributor housing and the housing location somewhere on the engine. I use a paint pen or WiteOut pen) and run the oil pump (counter clockwise) with an electric drill for about 10 seconds after oil pressure is obtained (you'll know when the drill starts "bogging"). If not an option, disconnect the coil wire from the distributor cap and ground it and crank the engine until oil pressure begins to register on the gauge.
16 ozs of oil in total would require one more step...start the car outside your garage...LOL
2 cups of oil in the exhaust system will be a real "smoke show"...
 

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16 ozs of oil in total would require one more step...start the car outside your garage...LOL
2 cups of oil in the exhaust system will be a real "smoke show"...
Like a mosquito truck driving through the neighborhood! kip
 

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When I finished my car I had rebuilt the engine first and stored it in a bag for 10 years. I basically did exactly what Woodchuck said and it worked great. I’ll also add if it hasn’t been said. It’s a good idea to replace the mechanical fuel pump if it’s been sitting on there just cause that’s a long time for the diaphragm to sit dry.
Not just the fuel pump, but the carburetor's accelerator pump diaphragm and other gaskets. Fill the carb with new gas as suggested and let it sit for a while, or at a minimum don't pump the pedal as that might result in a torn accelerator pump diaphragm.
 
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Have a catch pan and a fire extinguisher (Element if you have It, dry chemical if you don't), some rags (both wet and dry) handy, safety glasses, watch your fingers at the fan, watch your head at the hood catch, and your favorite cold beverage to enjoy when that baby runs !!
 
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16 ozs of oil in total would require one more step...start the car outside your garage...LOL
2 cups of oil in the exhaust system will be a real "smoke show"...
Once you rotate the engine over a couple revolutions and spread it all out, and then dilute it with a fuel/air mixture, it quickly clears out.

You should see it after dumping a quart of ATF down the carburetor of a running engine to stall it and let it soak to free up stuck valves....
 
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