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Discussion Starter #1
I'm building my 66 convertible as a 95+% daily driver, and am right now in the middle of putting 4 wheel disk brakes, global west suspension, etc on it.

As I'm plumbing the brake lines, it occurs to me that it would be VERY easy to install a line-lock at this point. (I'm making all new lines for my new MC anyway, as it has the ports on the passenger side.)

Other than cost and brake line complexity, is there any downside to having a line lock in a car that's only drag raced on 1-3 "street nights" (at the local track) a year? Any safety concerns?

(Presume that I can make the lines and install everything correctly and leak free, of course.)
 

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dodgestang said:
No real downside....and it can make sitting at stop signs/lights more fun.
+1

Your setup is exactly what I have (more like 99% daily driver...). And the line lock is fun to show friends!
 

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Only downside is cost and work to install it. I have it in my car. You can see the solenoid to the right and below of the master cylinder.

http://hubgarage.s3.amazonaws.com/photos/1362413/IMG_8525_detail.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter #6
OK, I'm pretty much sold then, (esp since I have to make up all new lines anyway :) )

One last question.

If you're in the car, sitting level and still, no feet on any pedals, press and hold the button, does that lock out the front brakes from working?

IOW, if the system were to fail "on" in cruise somehow, would the front lines be locked out with no pressure, and would that prevent the MC from sending fluid pressure to the rears? Obviously I'd be careful with the install hydraulics and electrics, but I want to know my possible failure modes. Thanks.
 

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IIRC, the line lock solenoid has a spring inside of it that prevents the cylinder from failing "on". Only when current is run through the system does the cylinder work against the spring to block off the fluid path. When the current is shut off, the internal spring pushes the cylinder out of the way of the fluid path so that fluid can once again flow freely.

This internal spring also enables you to install the line lock solenoid vertically or horizontally, as gravity/fluid pressure alone is NOT used to return the cylinder to its original "off" position. The spring does that.

So you shouldn't have to worry about it failing "on".
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Sorry. I wasn't even considering a mechanical failure. I was considering an electrical/wiring failure that would cause the solenoid to be energized not under driver command.
 

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The solenoid is nothing more than a valve. If there's pressure in the brake lines, it's going to trap that pressure if it's activated. If it activates without any pressure in the brake lines, then it will lock out the front brakes. You could still stop. Your braking ability will just be greatly reduced.
 

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Maxum is correct - if the fails "on" with the brakes applied then you don't go anywhere. If it fails "on" without the brakes on, you will still have braking, although greatly reduced. (the rear will still work)
 
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