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Discussion Starter #1
I built a set of the roller coil spring perches with a deviation from the Daze cars version. I used lock collars (available at TSC stores) inboard of the bearings and also drilled access holes for the shocks. I still need to close up the sides and clean up the welds. Very fun project.
 

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Just some guy
67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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That ought to work. I like the retainers. Years ago I also deviated form the original Opentracker design. Instead of welding I decided to do it the machine shop way instead of welding with needle bearings instead of rollers. A project I also enjoyed. Didn't really take pictures but here's one.


 

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Discussion Starter #3
I originally planned on the smaller roller bearings with a zerk just like yours, but I could not find a correctly sized one.
 

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That ought to work. I like the retainers. Years ago I also deviated form the original Opentracker design. Instead of welding I decided to do it the machine shop way instead of welding with needle bearings instead of rollers. A project I also enjoyed. Didn't really take pictures but here's one.


Is there any chance you have the part numbers of the bearings you used? I would like to do the same thing.
 

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I ended up using oil impregnated bushings. I like the idea of needle bearings though, those should spread the load out better than ball bearings (which I assume most folks are using by the looks).

737988
 

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I made a set a number of years ago that looked just like daveoxide's. I found the bushings at my local tractor supply. They worked well.
 

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What keeps the bearing centered in the perch. I see a keeper ring on Davewoxide's perch but I don't see one on GypsyR's or Theyman's
From the Daze instructions found on his website:

"The center shaft can now be slid into the perch. Center it in the journal so that there is an equal amount of lip hanging off on each side. Then take a ball pein hammer and LIGHTLY tap the edge of the pipe bending it in. Bend in two small sections on one end of the shaft and then flip the perch over and tap the edge on two or three spots on the other end of the shaft. Once the center section is held in place, you can finish taping (sic) the edge all the way around the bearing on both sides."
 

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Discussion Starter #10
What keeps the bearing centered in the perch. I see a keeper ring on Davewoxide's perch but I don't see one on GypsyR's or Theyman's
The lock collars keep it centered. I also welded them in place instead of trust the set screw to hold. The outer lip is lightly hammerd over.
 

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Just some guy
67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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Is there any chance you have the part numbers of the bearings you used? I would like to do the same thing.
Unfortunately it's not quite that easy. I turned down the pins on a lathe so I could use bearings that fit in the stock sleeve. This gave me misgivings about strength so I consulted a machinist friend. He pulled out a couple of huge reference books after questioning me about the weight of the car and made lots of voodoo material strength mumbo jumbo noises before producing a hand written recipe for heat treating the pins. I have a small heat treating oven. Plus he decreed the finish on my pins was not good enough for a bearing surface. So I turned the pins down a tad more to fit some hardened sleeves from McMaster-Carr. The centers of the pins were not cut down and that's what the bearings are up against. On the outside I simply peened the outer sleeves down to keep the bearing in. You might note the OEM sleeves are peened to help retain the rubber bushing.

If I dig deep enough I believe I have the bearing and sleeve part numbers somewhere even though this was done over ten years ago. As you can see, this isn't a mod for everybody and there's a chance the pins may be weakened by being machined to a reduced diameter.
 

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Unfortunately it's not quite that easy. I turned down the pins on a lathe so I could use bearings that fit in the stock sleeve. This gave me misgivings about strength so I consulted a machinist friend. He pulled out a couple of huge reference books after questioning me about the weight of the car and made lots of voodoo material strength mumbo jumbo noises before producing a hand written recipe for heat treating the pins. I have a small heat treating oven. Plus he decreed the finish on my pins was not good enough for a bearing surface. So I turned the pins down a tad more to fit some hardened sleeves from McMaster-Carr. The centers of the pins were not cut down and that's what the bearings are up against. On the outside I simply peened the outer sleeves down to keep the bearing in. You might note the OEM sleeves are peened to help retain the rubber bushing.

If I dig deep enough I believe I have the bearing and sleeve part numbers somewhere even though this was done over ten years ago. As you can see, this isn't a mod for everybody and there's a chance the pins may be weakened by being machined to a reduced diameter.
If I thought that the original pins were not up to the task i could make new ones fron 4140 and HT them.I still wold like the bearing numbers regardless. I'm a retired T&D maker with a fairly complete home shop.
I have also toyed with the "Oilite" or "Everdur" bearing conversion, I think some earlier Fords had this, the Zerk is a PITA though.
 

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Just some guy
67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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The numbers weren't right where I thought they'd be but they're somewhere. I'll dig a bit. I did a thread about what I did but it was about three forum upgrades back and has long since bitten the dust I think.
 

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Needle bearings may not be the best application for this. Since the assembly doesn't rotate completely the load will always be on just a handful of needles so they will wear out. It might not be important in this light load situation but something to think about.
 

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Just some guy
67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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Same applies to the popular ball bearing versions too I would imagine. I've seen evidences of such limited travel wear in motorcycle swingarm bushings for years. The solution to that is also to use bearings. The idea of needle bearings is that you can use some with a higher weight rating than the usual ball bearing versions. And we like to think the load capacity rating equivocates to more durability. In the swingarm applications I have also seen wear of the bearing on high mileage machines which is obviously due the limited bearing travel but possibly also lack of lube might have been a factor.. Rare to see though.
All that said, yes, limited motion does wear needles. We see that a lot in u-joints where the angles are reduced. But it's hard to compare the wear factor. Something you'd have to put a million miles of driving on the average roads to even approach the wear a u-joint's needle bearings see in a few thousand miles.
(Still looking for part numbers)
 

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The best bearing solution would be a greasable bronze bushing. They are much better in high load low rotation applications because the load is distributed over a much larger area. With ball bearings the load is being directly pushed onto a couple ball bearings in small point loads. Ever wonder why heavy equipment uses bushings?

Ball bearings are easier as it only requires very light lathe work where as bronze is much more labor intensive unless it was a production piece then it would be cheaper and faster.
 

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Just some guy
67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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I still wold like the bearing numbers regardless.
Couldn't find that piece of paper anywhere. It was on my desk for literally years, and now when someone asks...
I looked hard enough to find my original sketchout of the project but it had no part numbers.
So, on the off-chance, I did an "advanced search". Lo and behold. No clue where I was hosting pictures back then though.
 

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Just some guy
67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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I only have three pictures from back then. These are of version one, before I realized I needed the bearing liners and had to machine a bit more. (15 years ago! Jeez time flies and cars don't get finished.)


 
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Just some guy
67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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Since I was there, I read back through that old thread myself. I then realized there is no mention of version #2 anywhere. Where I took them all back apart and machined the pins a bit more for the bearing liners. Part numbers for which I do not have anymore though I swear there's a box in the shop because I KNOW I ordered some extras.
Side note, pop-in-law that helped me with that project has since passed away. Left me the tempering oven that he used though. Thing gets scary hot.
When I get to that point I expect to duplicate all this I did for my '67 on my '69.
 

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The best bearing solution would be a greasable bronze bushing. They are much better in high load low rotation applications because the load is distributed over a much larger area. With ball bearings the load is being directly pushed onto a couple ball bearings in small point loads. Ever wonder why heavy equipment uses bushings?

Ball bearings are easier as it only requires very light lathe work where as bronze is much more labor intensive unless it was a production piece then it would be cheaper and faster.
I like oil empregnated bronze, absolutely delightful to machine!
 
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