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Discussion Starter #1
Not sure how common of a problem this is.

Started her up on the second crank, drive about 15 mins, had it sit. Got back in, started on the first crank, drove another five minutes (all my car buddies live really close to each other, it’s really weird), and stopped for 20 mins. Started again, drove another 10 mins to Lowe’s for some rust treatment and sand discs. Got back in the car, crank, no start. Crank again, no start. Waited 5 mins. Cranked, started, decided to reverse so I could drive off as quickly as I could while the car gods were with me, and it died 10 seconds later. Waited 3 minutes, cranked, I tapped the gas a touch and it ran the rest of the drive.

the heck bro? I’m sure it could be a number of issues, but this is a legit bummer. Any advice would be helpful.
 

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It’s fuel related.
Maybe just need a new fuel filter.
But most likely it’s the fuel boiling out of the carburetor on a hot engine on a hot day.
Try installing a 1/2 inch thick phenolic carb spacer to insulate the carb from the hot engine.
 

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Or you coil might be starting to crap/ignition out on you.
 
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It's bound to be one of the two- either boiling gas or coil going bad. Both problems are related to heat.
 

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Good info on the carb boiling. I think it may be the coil as 69drop mention. It has everything to do with your start, and while your running. You may want to start there.
 

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How do you start when warm? Do you hold the gas pedal 1/4 of the way down and turn the key to "start"? Do you have anything "tapped in" to the ignition coil circuit (or "I" wire to the starter solenoid)? Do you have a solid-state ignition trigger (points replacement)? You could try connecting a timing light to the coil wire, taping the trigger down and running the wires out the back of the hood, and hooking the light to the passenger-side wiper arm so you can see the "flash" from the driver's seat. Then, drive until the car dies and quickly look to see if the light continues to flash as the engine conks out. If it DOES, the problem is fuel-related. If the light stops flashing first then it's ignition-related.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
No, I start as I normally do when the engine wasn’t warm. And I don’t know the answer to any other question you asked, but I’m going to start looking today. Thanks for your help.
 

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What ignition are you running?

- If it's points, these are classic symptoms of a bad condensor. It almost never happens, but when it does, that's how it happens.

- If you have an electronic module, it could be overheating. If it wasn't installed properly with the correct, thermal grease, it would behave just as you describe. If it isn't toasted, re-installing with the correct, thermal grease could save it. If it's toasted, you'll have to replace it.

- As mentioned above, it could also be a failing coil.

Obviously, I'm leaning toward ignition rather than carburetion.
 

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(Since your car runs well, I suspect the only change you need to make is to your warm condition starting procedure)

This is a common experience with owners that are used to EFI cars. Consider the following:

Gas vapors are heavier than air and sink.

When your carb is hot, the fuel in the bowls expand and push vapors into the carb where they sink down into the intake manifold. There they build up until either they have time to evaporate out or you return to start the engine.

With the intake full of gas vapors, the engine is in a "Rich" state. Starting procedure for this condition requires more air to be added for the engine to not experience a flooded condition. This is why you need to hold the pedal at 1/2 or 1/4 way down. Do not press the pedal any more than is required to open the throttle and do not release the pedal until the engine has fired. The open throttle will allow the extra air needed to lean out the rich mixture.

 

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Discussion Starter #10
Could it be a bad ground? Looks like the ground is running from the battery to the radiator.
 

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It would be interesting to have you report back your experiences after using the recommended warm start procedure described in the owner's manual in the video above.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
OKAY! Engine was nice and warmed up, I shut it off, turned the key to On, pushed the pedal 1/4 of the way and she fired right up.

I did this 4 times to make sure, but I’m certain this is it. Looks like I have a lot to learn about this thing... 😅

Will post if anything changes (I’m not recreating the events right now exactly as they happened originally).
 

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Unfortunately I am one of the old farts that recall the starting procedure for carbureted cars.

Yes, lots of nuances with older cars if you didn’t grow up with them. The current thread on locking doors upon exiting is another
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Funny you should say that. Two days ago I opened the door, locked it, then closed the door just for it to unlock again. Thought - great, add that to the list of problems. Didn’t think that it was done that way on purpose and the only way to lock it after leaving was on the outside 😂
 

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You can lock the door by first, push down the lock button, then press the handle button in on the outside handle and hold it; finally, close the door while holding the handle button in. If I remember right, this "feature" was added to help prevent doors from accidently being shut and locked with the keys still inside. I don't know exactly what year this feature was added, but my Mom and Dad had cars when I was little that did not require the button be held in. I remember us kids closing the locked door a couple of times when Mom had left the keys on the seat and being mad at us for locking the keys inside.
 

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You can lock the door by first, push down the lock button, then press the handle button in on the outside handle and hold it; finally, close the door while holding the handle button in. If I remember right, this "feature" was added to help prevent doors from accidently being shut and locked with the keys still inside. I don't know exactly what year this feature was added, but my Mom and Dad had cars when I was little that did not require the button be held in. I remember us kids closing the locked door a couple of times when Mom had left the keys on the seat and being mad at us for locking the keys inside.
Not on a '65-66 you can't.
 
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