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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So basically most if not all of underneath my mustang has,rface rust. It's been sitting for a while, body panels have surface rust and such. but i wanted to know the best way to remove the rust from underneath my car and re-coat it. Any suggestions?
 

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Two ways to remove rust, mechanical, aka sanding, grinding, blasting. Or chemical, phosphoric acid, navel jelly etc... both are labor intensive. Post up some pics and we can direct you better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Two ways to remove rust, mechanical, aka sanding, grinding, blasting. Or chemical, phosphoric acid, navel jelly etc... both are labor intensive. Post up some pics and we can direct you better.
can't get pics at the moment, but just picture a layer of surface rust under the car, front to back
 

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If its truly just surface rust I would treat it with phosphoric acid, and coat it with master series silver and top coat it black.
 
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Yes as others have said…shoot some Ospho on it. It’s an acid etch and can also be used to prep bare metal before primer. I’d lightly sand off as much surface as you can to get the maximum effect from Ospho. Then coat it with a rust encapsulator/primer such as Eastwood.
 

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Use a 4 1/2" angle grinder with a couple different style wire wheels to get the heavy stuff off. Spray on phosphoric acid to kill the rest of the rust and then as others said, Master Series or Rust Bullet.
 
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Milk stone remover can be found at nearly any farm and home store, is way cheaper than ospho, and is the same thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·

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I was half expecting something else when I saw the title of the thread. This subject is more appropriate.
 

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My car had no visible rust and I still had to replace 2 floor pans but the best way I found is jack the car up and get a angle grinder with a wire wheel and a poly carbon wheel. Then topcoat with epoxy primer. Im guessing some floor pan replacement will be needed
803547
 

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I guess the answer really depends on how far you are going with the restoration. The best way(at least the best way most people have access to) is to strip the car down, throw it on a rotisserie and media blast it(the particular type of blasting will differ depending...but sandblasting is not a problem for the undercarriage even at high pressure. I sandblasted my undercarriage @60psi with some black diamond "crushed glass"(isn't that just sand?) I bought from tractor supply co for $10 a bag. I used a LOT of sand, but the panels never even warmed up beyond a few degrees above ambient...so the whole warping thing people are so anti-sandblasting about does not happen if you dont turn up the pressure to crazy amounts(I would still hand-sand and large flat panels).

The rest of the car I had "dustless" blasted...which essentially just mixes water with sand to control temperatures...he blasted at a much higher pressure than I did(I got tired of the misery of sandblasting the car myself, it was taking forever, so I outsourced the interior and exterior). No warped panels.

I understand a lot of people aren't going rotisserie route....in which case an angle grinder with a wire wheel and an Ospho-like product is a perfectly viable way of doing the job.

I suppose the very best way would be to dip the entire unibody...but I don't have any clue what that process would cost...I am sure its not cheap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I guess the answer really depends on how far you are going with the restoration. The best way(at least the best way most people have access to) is to strip the car down, throw it on a rotisserie and media blast it(the particular type of blasting will differ depending...but sandblasting is not a problem for the undercarriage even at high pressure. I sandblasted my undercarriage @60psi with some black diamond "crushed glass"(isn't that just sand?) I bought from tractor supply co for $10 a bag. I used a LOT of sand, but the panels never even warmed up beyond a few degrees above ambient...so the whole warping thing people are so anti-sandblasting about does not happen if you dont turn up the pressure to crazy amounts(I would still hand-sand and large flat panels).

The rest of the car I had "dustless" blasted...which essentially just mixes water with sand to control temperatures...he blasted at a much higher pressure than I did(I got tired of the misery of sandblasting the car myself, it was taking forever, so I outsourced the interior and exterior). No warped panels.

I understand a lot of people aren't going rotisserie route....in which case an angle grinder with a wire wheel and an Ospho-like product is a perfectly viable way of doing the job.

I suppose the very best way would be to dip the entire unibody...but I don't have any clue what that process would cost...I am sure its not cheap.
most of what im doing is on a budget as im a 17 year old high school student
 
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most of what im doing is on a budget as im a 17 year old high school student
That's exactly how I started. Way before the internet and VMF, I used articles and pictures from Mustang & Fords, Mustang Monthly, and photos I would take with my Dad's 35mm camera and have developed at Wal-Mart's photo lab...to try to "restore" my car while driving it to high school, jobs and the occasional guitar playing gig. I applaud you are doing this yourself, on a budget, and I hope you get to enjoy your care exponentially as much as VMF had made the hobby !!
 

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If youre gonna be under there treating that metal, be sure you use the proper ppe, faceshields and dust mask.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
If youre gonna be under there treating that metal, be sure you use the proper ppe, faceshields and dust mask.
thank you for telling me that, or else i probably wouldnt have lol
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I was young and invincible once too. LOL. Good luck
dont plan on doing it too soon, i think i rather replace my entire floor pan before i tackle the rest. theres only a few holes in the floot pan that i could just put simple patches on, but i rather just have brand new panels front to back
 

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Typically I'd advise people to do full pans. I've done both and the full pans are easier but more involved. Being young and of limited means I'd recommend not tearing the car down to the bones and just weld in some patches, he'll, depending on your holes, treat em and screw a patch over top. Keep it drivable, make it safe, make it reliable then Worry about the upgrades/fun stuff. If not you end up dragging a rusty carcass around for 25 years until you have the time, money and a supportive spouse before you really make progress on it.... don't ask how i know...
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Typically I'd advise people to do full pans. I've done both and the full pans are easier but more involved. Being young and of limited means I'd recommend not tearing the car down to the bones and just weld in some patches, he'll, depending on your holes, treat em and screw a patch over top. Keep it drivable, make it safe, make it reliable then Worry about the upgrades/fun stuff. If not you end up dragging a rusty carcass around for 25 years until you have the time, money and a supportive spouse before you really make progress on it.... don't ask how i know...
Typically I'd advise people to do full pans. I've done both and the full pans are easier but more involved. Being young and of limited means I'd recommend not tearing the car down to the bones and just weld in some patches, he'll, depending on your holes, treat em and screw a patch over top. Keep it drivable, make it safe, make it reliable then Worry about the upgrades/fun stuff. If not you end up dragging a rusty carcass around for 25 years until you have the time, money and a supportive spouse before you really make progress on it.... don't ask how i know...
im definitely not screwing in a patch, main reason i havent had my car is cause the trunk was ruined with license plates screwed in as patches. the welding should be done this weekend. I do have people helping me out, its not just me. main guy helping me has his own shop and everything. My plan is to get a full pan and weld it in one weekend
 
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