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I just got my car up on the rotisserie last night and get it spinning, my god, I can't imagine working on the car with out one. It is awesome! Anyway, I am going to be sandblasting the engine compartment, interior, undercarriage and other small stuff on the car (not the body panels) I am going to putting up a "plastic room" in my garage that is sealed (as much as I can) to sand blast in. I am hoping that it will keep all the sand inside (I will be attaching the plastic to the ceiling with small strips of wood and duct taping the plastic to the ceiling to try and seal it, on the floor I am going to tape also) My problem is that I go to school mon. - thurs. night so I can't spend day and night on the blasting. Once I am done blasting everything I am going to vacuum/blow all the sand out, scrub it down with marine clean, then etch everything with metal ready, then POR-15 everything that is blasted. My question is how much time would I have before flash rust starts on the freshly blasted metal? For anyone that has blasted their car, how long does it take (I have a pressurized blaster)? I know I can spray wd-40 or something like that on the surface of the blasted metal but i don't like the idea of putting on something that I HAVE to get ALL of it off before I can POR-15 it. Is that what I am going to have to do?

Thanks in advance for the advice/help,
Jason
 
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First of all DON'T use sand on large flat panels, the heat generated using that medium will warp them and you will have a real mess which will be almost impossible to repair.Use plastic media or glass beads.
As for the rust, on a hot humid Ohio day it will start within a few hours. Your best bet would be after each session to put a dehumidifier in your blasting tent with the drain going outside and complete the job as soon as possible. An air drier between the compressor and the blaster also helps a lot! Regards -----Kechke
 

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1) Speed of sandblasting depends on the CFMs of your compressor. If you had unlimited air, you could do everything in a few hours.
2) Even if you bag the garage, sand and powdered paint will get everywhere.
3) If you are using POR-15, don't worry about rust. POR loves to stick to rust. Don't wash or metal prep either. The sandblasting does the etching.
4) Blow off the sandblasted areas to be POR-15ed, and brush paint it. Don't dip directly out of the POR can. Pour some into a plastic container and get the lid back on the POR can as soon as possible. If you leave the can open, the next day the POR will be hard.
5) Sand will continue to seep and dribble out of nooks and crannies in your car for YEARS.
6) I did everything you are trying to do and I learned the above the hard way.
 

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I am currently in the sandblasting mode prior to body panel replacement on my Mach 1. I had previously blasted quite a bit a number of years ago. On some of those panels I didn't see flash rust for years. Recently when I resumed blasting I saw flash rust in several days, not too bad though.

I have blasted body panels before and have never seen even a hint of warpage due to blasting.

Blasting takes considerable time. I have been using a tptools 99er' with a big air compressor and after an hour or two it is very troubling to see how much is actually done.

Based on recs from this site I got some Dupont 5717s metal conditioner and am using that after blasting.

I will blast most of the body then begin panel replacement. After the panels are replaced then, and during, I will get the thing free of sand, followed with an epoxy primer.

I don't know to what lengths you are going to on your blasting but to me this is a long and very unrewarding task. It doesn't seem like I am making progress.

I haven't even gone into the dark tunnel, let alone be getting close to the light at the end.
 

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let me chim in....I've never seen the fabled warpage happen to something I sandblasted either
 

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I built a building out of 2x4s and sheet plastic to do sandblasting in...worked great. I sprayed the metal down with phosphoric acid afterwards and water rinsed...the acid etches and leaves a phosphate coating that will buy you a few days before rerusting.
 

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You are not going to create enough heat with a home sandblasting system to warp panels. If you took it to a commercial sandblaster it would be warped so dont worry. I have a couple of doors I sandblasted back in December and am storing out in a shed, I didn't have time to put them in primer and they are still shiney and clean, even in Kansas humidity. I doubt you will have a flash rust problem but I do believe you will be wasting the por 15 as it is not designed for clean shiney metal..
 

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i find por15 sticks REALLY well to sandblasted metal, so long as its a really good grit (i use playsand, not the smartest choice yes i know). Sandblasted metal is the best success ive had with getting por15 to stick
 

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Cpegram has the right idea.

I would also heed the warnings about panel warpage from careless blasting. I have seen a number of cars over the years who've needed thousands of dollars in additional bodywork in order to undo warping caused by blasting friction.

This is the way I would do it:
* blast the car and remove all paint/sealer/undercoat
* blow out all the blasting media from everywhere you can - this is much more difficult than it sounds
* treat all exposed metal with a zinc/phosphoric-acid-based acid product like OxySolv.

The Oxysolv will prevent rust for months. When you are ready to paint, follow the product's directions. Usually, a damp rag or sponge wipedown will remove the excess rust preventative.

Again - follow the manufacturer's recomendations in order to avoid paint adhesion problems.
 
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