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Based on all the posts of successful DIY reupholstery projects, I decided to tackle my '65 seats by myself.

I purchased new seat foams, vinyl, some burlap, and a bunch of hog rings. The only thing I altered from the numerous directions was the use of hanger wire to secure the listings (I used to install acoustical ceiling tile, and after failing to get a single hog ring in the listing after an hour, decided to make "hangers" - they work really great, since you can pull and twist until the listing is really tight to the frame)...

Anyway, it took 5 hours, but I finally had both sections of the driver's seat done (and no wrinkles). Then I went to reattach the hinges...

First, it appears the new foam is MUCH thicker (the seat tilt adjuster plate sat flush with the old foam- now, I had to really work to get it back on and the foam is about 1" proud of the plate). If I really push, it looks like I could get the seat parts to mate again (not sure how easy it would be to fold the seat, but...).

There is NO WAY I'm going to get the hinges back together though! It looks like I'm going to have to spread the hinge a good 3/4" to get them over those stupid studs (the need for the cotter pins is looking like a joke from Ford right now). I am working with a repro seat bottom (old one was broke on both sides when I bought the car, and was already rewelded once). It kinda looks like the ends of the studs are an additional 3/8" or so over the original seat.

So, are there any tricks or secret phrases that need to be uttered to get the seat back attached the to base again? I'm ready to send the whole project out to a pro at this point (which is just frustrating after initial success and so much time). I'm guessing some of the foam needs to be cut out- probably from the bottom- to get the two parts back together as well...

Thanks for ANY advice!
 

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I've only done a few sets of '68's, but getting the back on over the studs is always a bit of a stretch. I place a fair thickness of towel against the seat bottom, and lever the longer arm over the stud with a flat bar.
 

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ive used a bar thats flat on one end and about 3 foot long so you have enough leverage. i position it on the floor on top of cardboard to protect the seat from dirt ect and use a towel or some old uph to protect new. As Dalorzof said be sure to try this on the longer arm. if you have arms of a weight lifter you probably wouldnt need the bar. a tire iron is too short for me. wes
 

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Keep at it!

It's sort-of like putting a small lawn mower tire on a 1-piece rim.
It's hard, frustrating, requires prying, and it's easy to damage your new upholstery, but it can be done.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Okay- so leverage is my friend... got it.

Do I need to remove some foam before getting the hinge back together? It seems like a lot of force is required just to compress the new foam enough to get the hole where it could even line up with the stud.

Both the seat back and bottom measure an extra 1" thick with the new foam- do I need to remove some near the joint, or does the foam just compress over time? It doesn't seem like the seat would be able to fold forward if I do get the hinge together (and there is no way I'm ever taking the thing back apart if I manage to hear a marvelous "click" sound of the thing seating :^).

Thanks,
Pete
 

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Looks Like Mine

The one on the left looks fine. The one on the right looks like the back end of the bottom's cover needs pulled a little tighter before hog-ringing.
 
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