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My seats need to be recovered and possibly some foam and spring work. I don't really know yet as I don't have them out of the car yet and they have crappy seat diapers on them now.

My question though is should I send them out to an auto upholstry shop or tackle the job myself? This is a weekend driver, not for show, although I do want the seats to look good. ;)

Go ahead and give the the good, bad and ugly about seat upholstry projects!

Thanks!!
Mike.
 

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If by DIY you mean finding a good upholsterer and writing him a check, then yes, DIY.

Deke
 

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i did mine for the first time last spring. I cant say it was easy, I cant say i want to do it again, I cant say it was a quckie job, but they turned out nice.
you need the hog ring plier kit from any vendor, I used the curved. just make sure you get the locking pliers. youll be glad you did. you also need listing wire or a pile of coat hangers. i used the later.
then do one at a time and very time you lock down a ring flip the seat to be sure its all staright.

I dd the back first and when I had some confideance did the fronts.

youll need a hot day, lay the fabric out in the sun for a few hours so it stretches and go to work.

imo you cant really mess it up. if it turns out that bad then have a shop do it but if your handy with tools you wont have any probs

you save yourself a good $700
 

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Just did my '66 seats

I just did the seats in my '66 coupe. Blues Power is right, you do need a good pair of hog ring pliers and snips (got mine from NPD). It's not hard at all if you have a helper. One person to stretch and hold and the other to clamp the hog rings. I don't think I would tackle it by myself. But with help, it's very easy. Can be time consuming but easy. Biggest thing is to make sure the upholstery is positioned properly on the foam before you start hog ringing it down.
 

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I have seen so many forum members post good results from their first time experience with reupholstering seats, that I would not be afraid to tackle it for the first time either.

Make sure the new covers are warmed up, either in the sun (if you aren't doing it during the winter), or after a few minutes in the dryer. They will stretch more easily. Do one seat at a time, that way, you can use the other seat as a reference.
 

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I sent my front seats out. I had the upholstery and new foam. I tried doing it myself without a helper. Didn't know about heating the seat covers up. They did both seats including putting new juke in both seats and putting the backs on. I think I paid $215. and was very happy with the job they did. I switched from standard to pony seat covers. I did the back seat myself. The rear seat and back was easy. I installed the covers over top of the old covers (which were in good shape). If I had to do it again, I'd try at first, knowing what I know now.
 

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Just finished my son's with no problems. If you get the hog rings locally, get pig rings, a little smaller. Any farm store will have them and the pliers. Make sure to get the wire down in the crease good and secure or they'll come out flat.
 

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I did my back seat and it went well, but I felt the front seats would be trickier (ie tying down the listing) and had an upholsterer do them. Feel the $200 I paid was well spent.

Deke
 

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I thought it was fairly easy. Took a little time and patience but it was very rewarding. Buy good hogring pliers and it will help.
Definite doable DIY project.
Pics: Seats
 

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Go for it. Do it on a nice warm summer day and lay the covers out in the sun for a good couple hours to get them nice and plyable. Will make it much easier and your seats will turn out better.
 

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Piece of cake. I've done the Mustang and the Bronco seats. Take your time, do a YouTube search for some pointers, invest in a high quality set of hog ring pliers and have at it. Make sure you replace the seat foam and don't forget the burlap or you'll wear out the new covers quick. Ask me how I know...
 

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I am planning on doing the seats in my '68 myself, the front buckets that is. The rear seat and back are fine and I only have the complete set to do only the front, great deal on fleabay from a shop getting rid of excess inventory. I just got the foam and the guy that sold me the upholstery tossed in a crapload of hogrings so just need the pliers which I am borrowing from a good friend who did her seats w/the help of her daughter last year. A tip I read somewhere awhile ago was that you can get the burlap lining from a crafts material store like Michael's here on the west coast for alot cheaper than from a Mustang parts house. You should be able to reuse your old listings as long as they're not rusted into pieces or bent too bad, otherwise new ones or old wire clothes hangers as was suggested somewhere above.

You will enjoy the satisfaction of having done them yourself and by doing that you reserve the right to brag to your friends and family about it and share your pride and joy w/us here on the VMF!

Best of luck man and let us all know how it goes!

Oscar
 

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my friend works at a matress factory. gonna see if she can do my seats. she made me curtains and pillows last year.
 

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I will have to post some pics of my recent seat project for my '66 Convertible. One thing that I can say is that Convertible seats take way more of a beating than Hardtop/Fastback seats. I've been doing mustang seats for over 20 years, and the Hardtop seats and foam are usually in usable shape. Not with convertibles The seat frames get way more surface rust and you have to strip them to the bone, then clean, sand prime, and re-paint. I also for the first time ever bought all new foam. I went with NPD'S expensive stuff. Well worth it IMHO.. I'll post pics tomorrow.

Tony K.
 

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I just did the seats in my '66 coupe. Blues Power is right, you do need a good pair of hog ring pliers and snips (got mine from NPD). It's not hard at all if you have a helper. One person to stretch and hold and the other to clamp the hog rings. I don't think I would tackle it by myself. But with help, it's very easy. Can be time consuming but easy. Biggest thing is to make sure the upholstery is positioned properly on the foam before you start hog ringing it down.
Gary: Seats look very nice. Did you use the TMI upgraded foam, etc? Make those original seats more comfortable AND good looking!
 

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Gary: Seats look very nice. Did you use the TMI upgraded foam, etc? Make those original seats more comfortable AND good looking!
They are the TMI upgrades. The original stang seats were never known for comfort (might as well sit on a 2 x 12). This new foam is so comfortable, relatively speaking, it's amazing. See the thread I started "Progress Pix of my '66" where I got into my upholstery experiences there a bit. Several have talked about doing the job in the summer. I just did mine using the clothes dryer and a hair dryer with great results and it was 60 some degrees in the garage (single digits outside and haven't seen the sun in 3 weeks). In other words, if you're ready to do the job, have at it. Don't let the calendar dictate.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks for all of the replies, folks! I plan to pull the seats out this weekend so I can see the extent of the project.

From all of the tips posted I think I'll try to do it myself. Worst case is I cart them off to a pro.

Mike.
 

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I just did the seats in my '66 coupe. Blues Power is right, you do need a good pair of hog ring pliers and snips (got mine from NPD). It's not hard at all if you have a helper. One person to stretch and hold and the other to clamp the hog rings. I don't think I would tackle it by myself. But with help, it's very easy. Can be time consuming but easy. Biggest thing is to make sure the upholstery is positioned properly on the foam before you start hog ringing it down.
I MAY let the wife help again. First car we did together I was stretching and told her to put a ring in. Well she did but put the ring through my thumb. Man did that hurt. Did two other cars by myself! A hair dryer is very helpful for warming the covers. Have on to do now and may consider her help but this time she can stretch and I get the pliers!!
 
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