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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, so totally new at this and will be building a chassis jig this summer so I can do bodywork. Just for reference, the car has been in the family since purchased new in 65. Never had any metal/bodywork, but it does have a lot of rust I’m trying to address. The plan is to put it on casters so I can move it around and make it a tipping jig so I can blast it, epoxy prime, and do all the structural metalwork needed.

I’ve been reading a ton of comments about Liskey/shop manual dimensions. Despite all the conflicting items (which I’m not trying to go down…we have enough of those posts), I’m starting to feel comfortable enough to start this job. However, when trying to align the car to the jig and secure it, I’m not exactly sure where to start or if I base it off of Liskey or the shop manual. If I establish my plane under the car and start measuring points, I fear I might establish a line with a feature that is out of position. Is there a method to doing this, outside of measuring everything and constantly adjusting before securing the car to the jig? Any tips or tricks would be greatly appreciated!

Also, really stupid question here…Do the dimensional measurements take into account the total weight of the car or just the shell? Assume dimensions are based off just the shell, but I haven’t removed the engine yet and other heavy components which I think would raise the A measurement of Liskey and the 12.5 from the shop manual. Although, if its all based on some baseline/datum maybe not?
 

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I based mine off what this guy did. There are some misprints measurements out there. If you search you should find the correct measurements one piece of advice,, get it up off the floor. I didn't and am constantly working on my knees or laying down. How to design and build a frame jig in only 6 months!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I based mine off what this guy did. There are some misprints measurements out there. If you search you should find the correct measurements one piece of advice,, get it up off the floor. I didn't and am constantly working on my knees or laying down. How to design and build a frame jig in only 6 months!
Thanks Redneckgearhead. I definitely plan to make it tall. It'll be sitting on this for a long time so I don't want to be crawling around while having to work on it. The link you provided is definitely helpful. His jig long was pretty long and lean and I would be worried about flex. I was thinking of using 4" bar for the base frame...Is that overkill? I also planned on cramming as much cross supports and bracing on the jig as I can fit to ensure it doesn't twist. I'm not an engineer or even a mechanic, so figure overengineering the sucker is my best bet for having something rock solid when I don't know what I'm doing!!!
 

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It sounds like I am going though the same process. I first noted all my gaps looked pretty good before I started tearing everything off. They actually didn’t change much after engine and everything was torn out.

If you are looking at a tilting jig or rotisserie, I think your going to want to tear everything off anyway. However the points you are concerned about are part of the unibody and really should not change when engine, drivetrain and suspension are out...unless there is a lot of rust. I am going to be replacing all the metal before even thinking about a rotisserie.

As far as material, I would guess 4” is way overkill unless you are going to be doing some collision repair/frame straightening. I am using 2” and it is heavy.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Knapper. Sounds like we have the same game plan. I do plan on tearing everything off so I can tilt it, just want to make sure it is secured and won't budge once I get it mounted to the jig. I thought 4 might be overkill. The car has been in the family since '65 and hasn't had anything major happen to it, so I don't think I'll need to be straightening anything. Just address a lot of rust, which you mentioned, and make sure that when I'm done I don't create any new problems!

Just curious, what mounting points did you use to secure the jig? I was figuring the rear spring locations, front bumper mounts, but wasn't sure about the additional front or midsection support locations. Although, I guess that also depends on what you're having to replace, as you wouldn't want to secure it to something you're taking out later.
 

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I am still in the planning/figuring phase. I will likely use the shop manual specs for the most part. I think I plan to secure at the front bumper support, lower control arm mount, back of front floor extension, front rear leaf spring and rear bumper. I also think I will be rigging up something at the A pillar hinge post. I don’t plan on cutting anything or even putting on a jig until I have it well braced on the interior.
 

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Weight should make no difference if the chassis is solid. You can use whatever measurements you like as long as the net difference between the different locations remains the same. IMHO, I would secure the chassis, at 8 points as shown on the Liskey diagram, using "nut plates" temporarily tacked to the chassis (small plate with a nut welded to it) so you can thread a bolt into it and then adjust up and down on your jig using nuts.

I've received requests, on a fairly regular basis, for my chassis jig plans so now that you can attach files to posts here it is.
 

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As far as material, I would guess 4” is way overkill unless you are going to be doing some collision repair/frame straightening. I am using 2” and it is heavy.
What wall thickness? I’ve done similar fixturing with 2” .120 square tubing including my welding table. Heavy but stout.
 

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I would need to check, but 11 gauge iirc...1/8” ish.
 

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Overkill is not a bad idea if youre planning on rolling it around. Just a heads up as well, the link I provided, that guy didn't go full length of the car.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I don’t plan on cutting anything or even putting on a jig until I have it well braced on the interior.
Are you doing this through tack welding some tubing inside the cab? I've been thinking about this as well. Right now, all my doors and windows line up. I noticed that Liskey and the shop manual don't have dimensions for the interior, just the frame, and chassis (unless it is somewhere else?). I was planning on doing this first too because everything seems square now.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Weight should make no difference if the chassis is solid. You can use whatever measurements you like as long as the net difference between the different locations remains the same. IMHO, I would secure the chassis, at 8 points as shown on the Liskey diagram, using "nut plates" temporarily tacked to the chassis (small plate with a nut welded to it) so you can thread a bolt into it and then adjust up and down on your jig using nuts.

I've received requests, on a fairly regular basis, for my chassis jig plans so now that you can attach files to posts here it is.
Wow! This is great woodchuck! I actually found an older post of yours that showed a picture of your jig but didn't have the plans. I really appreciate the share! I think you could sell these. I am a little confused about your comments regarding using whatever measurements you like as long as the net difference between the different locations remains the same. Not sure what you mean...are you meaning as long as my before and after measurements are the same the actual number isn't as important? Assuming my car is already square.
 

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Plan is to level the car side to side, then brace as follows with tack welds...

Between shock towers
Between A pillars just above tunnel
Between B pillars just above tunnel
Trunk opening
Then cross between lower A pillar and lower part of sails.

I also have made a brace between A & B pillars, where the door would be.

I believe what Bart is saying is that you can use whatever you want as a height from the datum line as long as you adjust accordingly. If you want it to be 4” higher than the shop specs, add 4” to each measurement.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Ahhh, I was seriously wondering earlier, but that makes sense. Yeah, I plan to have this thing pretty tall to make it easier on me, so I will probably go up 12" from the baseline reference in the image dimensions. If your able to share some images once you get yours up I'd greatly appreciate it!
 

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Knowing the speed I work at, I hope you aren’t waiting for me😊. I am guessing I’ll be about ready to buy yours when you’re done. But, yes I will post pics. I am likely going to run close to the shop manual specs, but have it on 12” legs.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Ha, I'm not much better. I'm hoping to have it set up sometime this fall if I'm lucky.
 

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When I built my frame jig, I debated about making it a rotating type, but settled on a conventional style. I put large casters on it and was worth every penny. My 69 was a pretty straight unmolested, but was complete rust bucket. The only thing I salvaged frame wise was the four corners of the roof structure and the VIN tag. I made steel stanchions that picked up both rear leaf spring mounts using mount bolts and mounts that pick up the door hinge mounts and also mounts that picked up at the front bumper mount locations. That was really handy, because when I replaced pieces like the rear frame rails, I could cut out the old one and them mount a new on in its place. Then do the other side. Worked out great. I took a lot of measurements and during the build, had to improvise some mounts due to running a complete Mustang 2 style front end. I like being able to roll it around and get it out of the way. Body is almost done now, but will be sending off for paint on the frame jig, so it has been worth every penny. I will attempt to add a couple of pics.
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Discussion Starter #18
When I built my frame jig, I debated about making it a rotating type, but settled on a conventional style. I put large casters on it and was worth every penny. My 69 was a pretty straight unmolested, but was complete rust bucket. The only thing I salvaged frame wise was the four corners of the roof structure and the VIN tag. I made steel stanchions that picked up both rear leaf spring mounts using mount bolts and mounts that pick up the door hinge mounts and also mounts that picked up at the front bumper mount locations. That was really handy, because when I replaced pieces like the rear frame rails, I could cut out the old one and them mount a new on in its place. Then do the other side. Worked out great. I took a lot of measurements and during the build, had to improvise some mounts due to running a complete Mustang 2 style front end. I like being able to roll it around and get it out of the way. Body is almost done now, but will be sending off for paint on the frame jig, so it has been worth every penny. I will attempt to add a couple of pics.
Wow, looks like you've replaced just about everything. I look to be in a similar position, fairly unmolested...just a lot of rust. Fortunately, it's not quite that bad as I don't think I have the skills to tackle what you've done! Looks great. Casters are a definite must, as I plan on taking the body to get blasted/primed on it. The tipping part was so I could have a better angle as my neck doesn't like working in awkward positions. I'm thinking of something basic like curved plywood supports that could be bolted onto the jig when needed, using a shop crane to help tilt, and anchoring/weighting it once vertical.

I like how you secured it to the car, especially how you used pre-existing bolt locations in certain places. Sure seems a lot easier and allows you to install new body parts as needed, which you mentioned. New to welding...How did you make the upper bolt on supports? Is that just a 1" sq tubing with a flat bar welded to the end as a tab?
 

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This is my chassis jig locates in eight points all the chassis is adjustable on three-quarter inch rods with nuts and washers so you can elevate the height as desired once everything is leveled and True welded Installed four post tolock everything in place I can raise and lower the entire structure on my Lift as Needed I have replaced front frame sections firewall Cowl floors end of rear frame rails and entire Trunk and quarters
 
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