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I seem to attract rusty, disassembled convertibles. This one has the front frame rails and the driver's side inner rocker removed,.floppy doesn't begin to describe it. As I have repaired several chassis on this fixture I continue to upgrade and build more sophisticated alignment fixtures for different areas. It is constructed out of 4" square 3/16" wall tube with threaded adjustable main attachment points and slide style removable adjusters for the rear. I built it to be very strong and easy to get around, definitely not a one time use investment.

Fixture.jpg
 

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Shop manual vs Liskey, the shop manual is correct except for all but the last mesurement, and more or less agree with the liskey, it's just the reference line is in a different spot.

By memory the rear most dimentsion in the shop manual is about 7/8" too large. If you know your car hasn't been hit hard in the back it will be obvious where that should be.
 

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Wow, looks like you've replaced just about everything. I look to be in a similar position, fairly unmolested...just a lot of rust. Fortunately, it's not quite that bad as I don't think I have the skills to tackle what you've done! Looks great. Casters are a definite must, as I plan on taking the body to get blasted/primed on it. The tipping part was so I could have a better angle as my neck doesn't like working in awkward positions. I'm thinking of something basic like curved plywood supports that could be bolted onto the jig when needed, using a shop crane to help tilt, and anchoring/weighting it once vertical.

I like how you secured it to the car, especially how you used pre-existing bolt locations in certain places. Sure seems a lot easier and allows you to install new body parts as needed, which you mentioned. New to welding...How did you make the upper bolt on supports? Is that just a 1" sq tubing with a flat bar welded to the end as a tab?
The main frame is 2x4x .187 wall tubing. The vertical stanchions are 2x2 and the other braces are 1" square. For the rear spring eyes in the frame I made steel dowels that slide inside the rear spring mount, with one welded to each stanchion and the inboard one has a bolt passing thru it and screws into the fixed one mounted on the stanchion. The fwd spring I mounted some 1/2" ID tubing on a vertical hinged stanchion and had 1/2" bar stock in place of the bolt. The door hinge braces, I made flat plates to pick up the hinge bolt holes, welded to vertical posts that are hinged at the bottom so I could lean them back out of the way, or completely removed them. The internal bracing, I made as I went. I drilled/tapped holes in bar stock and welded that to the stanchions for a base and welded flat tabs to the bracing, so everything could be unbolted as necessary. It worked out pretty well. I didn't sweat it down to .001" tolerances, as Ford didn't either. The Dynacorn sheet metal, for the most part was fairly close in fit. I think I bought just about every piece of sheet metal Dynacorn sells. I added additional 1x3x.120" tubing along the inside of the of the rockers between torque boxes, similar to how a convertible is braced. My frame extends back to the rear spring front mounts and I wanted a stiff frame, because I am going to be shooting for the 600 HP range.
 
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