Vintage Mustang Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My rocker arm studs don't have a shoulder so instructions are to fully compress the lifter and set clearance around 0.100" at the valve stem. Is there a special tool to hold the rocker and lifter in the collapsed position while setting that? What does the tool look like and is it something I can fabricate?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
750 Posts
Are you having to re-adjust all the rockers after engine work or are you just re-adjusting the rockers for noise issues? If the engine is currently running, back off the adjusting nut until the lifter rattles, tighten it down to no rattle then turn it in slowly for 3/4 of a turn (which should center the hydraulic lifter). If there have been engine modifications (or rework/repair), then you'll have to follow the one-cylinder-at-time adjustment procedure. Even then you will probably have to go through the loosen & tighten steps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
This is an engine rebuild with a new stock cam and lifters. Is the require tool some kind of pry bar?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,874 Posts
I always set mine like the attached article tells you. If it's hydraulic lifters, those are covered at the bottom of the write-up.

749543
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
750 Posts
This is an engine rebuild with a new stock cam and lifters. Is the require tool some kind of pry bar?
The only tools I've had to use over the past 60 years has been a spark plug socket, 3" extension, 1/2" ratchet and a socket to fit the crankshaft bolt. I'd pull the plugs, turn the engine to #1 firing (TDC), adjust those valves. Then turn the engine to the next cylinder in firing order and adjust those until you go through the complete firing order.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
750 Posts
The only tools I've had to use over the past 60 years has been a spark plug socket, 3" extension, 1/2" ratchet and a socket to fit the crankshaft bolt. I'd pull the plugs, turn the engine to #1 firing (TDC), adjust those valves. Then turn the engine to the next cylinder in firing order and adjust those until you go through the complete firing order.
I should have added that you rotate the engine to line up the timing marks (that will be TDC for compression or exhaust). If you have the distributor in, that will tell you which it is. Otherwise, you'll have to watch #1 intake valve. When it opens then closes, that is the intake stroke. When it is closed, the timing marks should be very close.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I always set mine like the attached article tells you. If it's hydraulic lifters, those are covered at the bottom of the write-up.
That typically is how its done on GM. All Ford documents I've seen specify the other procedure. Yes, I'm installing hydraulic lifters.
 

·
Registered
1967 Mustang Convertible
Joined
·
864 Posts
The procedure you are describing is for Solid/Mechanical lifters. For Hydraulic lifters I always do it the way the article provided describes. Find 0 lash on the base of the cam and then 1/2-3/4 of turn after that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
750 Posts
That typically is how its done on GM. All Ford documents I've seen specify the other procedure. Yes, I'm installing hydraulic lifters.
Well, if all else fails, do it the way the Factory Service Manual says. Or send it out to a machine shop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,874 Posts
That typically is how its done on GM. All Ford documents I've seen specify the other procedure. Yes, I'm installing hydraulic lifters.
Couldn't care less about GM or Ford. That's how it's done in the race business. I originally learned it from a F1
engine guy. Good enough for you too I'm thinking....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Couldn't care less about GM or Ford. That's how it's done in the race business. I originally learned it from a F1
engine guy. Good enough for you too I'm thinking....
Well, I opened the new box of TRW lifters I bought back in 1977 and found instructions.
749743


You need something like this but I don't know where to get one.
I found a couple of versions of Ford's lifter bleed down wrench advertised. If I was going that way I'd probably make my own since I saw them listed at $200.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
I always set mine like the attached article tells you. If it's hydraulic lifters, those are covered at the bottom of the write-up.

View attachment 749543
This is the easiest way. Yes it really is that simple.

What you find in the service manual is some engineer over complicating the procedure on paper rather then actually having experiencing working on engines. It does not make it incorrect just alot more time consuming then it needs to be. Follow the above method and you we find this a very easy task and something you dont mind doing as regular maintenance.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top