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Discussion Starter #1
I know this sounds wrong and goes against what everyone thinks they know about vintage shaker hood scoops, but I'm going to tell you anyway.

I had an R code Mach 1 back in the mid through late 80's. It was black and I thought the shaker scoop would look good all shined up. I took it to a professional polishing business to buff it to a brilliant shine for me.

When I picked it up it looked great IMO. Then the polisher dropped a little random bomb on me. He said, "By the way, this isn't made out of aluminum, it's made with magnesium".

I always wondered about that and have never heard it said anytime since. So... I'm just letting you know what he told me. He seemed to be certain, though I'm not sure how he came to that conclusion.

Edit: He called it something else, not aluminum or magnesium, some sort of combo alloy that sounds more like magnesium.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Mine polished to a chrome like finish.

I googled Magnesium and found a Wiki..here's an excerpt.

"Commercially, the chief use for the metal is as an alloying agent to make aluminium-magnesium alloys, sometimes called "magnalium" or "magnelium". Since magnesium is less dense than aluminum, these alloys are prized for their relative lightness and strength."

I'm pretty sure that's what he called it, "magnelium".
 

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I always called it pot metal but what do I know? I had my black 69 428 SCJ Drag pack car, was black, with flat black hood and I thought a black shaker was just too much! So I too shined it up, using sand paper and rubbing compund and a whole lot of mothers compund and elbow grease! I really like the look myself! So kind of neat to hear another story similiar to my own!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It is a great look! Easily reversed later if need be. I had a feeling I wasn't the only person to put a shine on one. :burnout:
 

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There is no scientific metallurgical standard for pot metal; common metals in pot metal include zinc, lead, copper, tin, magnesium, aluminium, iron, and cadmium. The primary advantage of pot metal is that it is quick and easy to cast. Due to its low melting temperature no sophisticated foundry equipment is needed and specialized molds are not necessary.
From

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pot_metal
 
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