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Discussion Starter #1
I'm putting 67 spindles on my 65, to convert from drum to disc. I'm told this will change the geometry, but I don't yet know how (until I get the old spindles off and compare). I'm also wanting to lower it a little, so considering a Shelby drop, as I've heard good things about it. Does anyone know if the drop will counter the effect of 67 spindles? Is it as simple as, one way or another, achieving the ideal castor, camber etc specs quoted for the Shelby drop?

Anyone done this combination? Anyone fitted 67 spindles to a 65/66?
 

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The steering arms are wrong for a 65-66. It is totally unnecessary to change spindles to install disc brakes- The 65-66 had the same spindles drum or disc, and many sources offer reasonably-priced kits to do this. (67 had the same spindles either way, too).

Now, lots of people have done this conversion (the famous Granada conversion has the 67-73 geometry) and they didn't die, but low-speed manuevering will scrub the tires. OK on the freeway, sucks in a parking lot or tight autocross.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'm changing spindles because they are 4 stud drums (l6), and I'm going to 5 stud disc. I'm only using the 67 spindles because my mate had some, and 65 disc brake spindles are not easy to get hold of here in the UK.

It would really help me if I just knew what the difference in geometry is between the 65 and 67 spindles. If its a case of camber, it can be taken care of when shimming the arms to the Shelby spec. If it's not camber, what is it?
 

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The Shelby drop doesn't just drop the arms, it moves them back 1/8", and I need to know if 67 spindles also move things back or forwards, so I can allow for it when I make the hole templates
 

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I'm changing spindles because they are 4 stud drums (l6), and I'm going to 5 stud disc. I'm only using the 67 spindles because my mate had some, and 65 disc brake spindles are not easy to get hold of here in the UK.

It would really help me if I just knew what the difference in geometry is between the 65 and 67 spindles. If its a case of camber, it can be taken care of when shimming the arms to the Shelby spec. If it's not camber, what is it?
Are you installing a V8 engine?

And to repeat, there's no such thing as a 65-66 disc spindle. All V8 had the same spindle, regardless of brake type. 68 was the first year of the disc-unique spindle.
 

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The Shelby drop doesn't just drop the arms, it moves them back 1/8", and I need to know if 67 spindles also move things back or forwards, so I can allow for it when I make the hole templates
I'm one of those guys using 76ish Granada spindles . Do the UCA drop 1" down 1/8" back add a pair of adjustable strut rods and get the most Positive caster you can. I don't really have a bump steer or tire scrub issue . But like I said plenty of caster and stiffer springs help .YMMV
67277223_910103379342311_4494186609540857856_n.jpg
 

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I'm putting 67 spindles on my 65, to convert from drum to disc. I'm told this will change the geometry, but I don't yet know how (until I get the old spindles off and compare). I'm also wanting to lower it a little, so considering a Shelby drop, as I've heard good things about it. Does anyone know if the drop will counter the effect of 67 spindles? Is it as simple as, one way or another, achieving the ideal castor, camber etc specs quoted for the Shelby drop?

Anyone done this combination? Anyone fitted 67 spindles to a 65/66?
Wow.
So you're installing Brembo 4 piston calipers.......as if that won't look modified. What kit are you using? That way we'll
know what spindle is required. I believe that I'm hearing that you can't install the Brembo setup on the spindles that
come stock on a 6 cyl 65/66 Mustang. Is that correct?
Once again, 67 spindles on a 65/66 car will bumpsteer differently because the steering arms ARE NOT THE SAME.
(in the same plane, at the same height, the same length, etc)
Since all stock Mustangs have bumpsteer to some extent, it probably will be no better or worse. At Global if we made
that swap, we didn't drive them as is, we fixed them..... so I have no idea how it'll be or if you'll see anything untoward.
You could install Konis, crank them up in adjustment, the suspension won't move and bumpsteer won't be noticed.

BTW, '67 spindles have the same Ball Joint to Ball Joint height that you see on all 65-73 spindles. There are no
suspension geometry differences between vintage Mustang spindles.

ex-Global West GM
1991-1995
 

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I'm running 72 disc brakes on my 66. The geometry is the same as the Granada spindle. I don't do suspension work for a living or really race but I have a fairly modified front suspension with tubular control arms and a camber kit. I'm pretty much self taught, did all my own work and my own set ups on alignment. So yes I've spent a bit of time on this. If you drove my car you'd never know, I have the "wrong" spindles. There really isn't any bump steer issue either. @2nd 66 can tell you how my car drives and I can tell you how his drives, no noticeable bump steer either.

The basic difference between these spindles has to do with the tie rod arms. The 67 and later arms are about 7/16" shorter, they are angled in more by about 3/8" and the arms are flatter by 1/2". This makes the tie road assembly of the inner, outer and sleeve shorter hen normal. Instead of following the same arc of the lower arm it now follows a tighter arc which can and will steer the car as the suspension travels. So the object is to make the tie rod assembly longer by what ever means you can along with playing with toe. Things like adding caster or lowering the mounting point of the outer tie rod to spindle do this with a "bump steer" kit. 5* of positive caster roughly makes up for the less off set ( 1/2" ) of the later spindle.

It's important to understand what changes are going on in the suspension as it goes through it's range of travel. Since it's a rear steer linkage, as the suspension extends, the tires toe in, as it compresses, they the toe out. When completely stock the suspension is pretty much in the middle of it's travel and toe in or toe out from the at rest point is not to that point where it starts to do funny things. Once the suspension is lower, you now have your suspension biased to toe in travel and with a greater amount of toe in then toe out. This is where problems show up. Now as the suspension extends such as going over rail road tracks or a crest in the road and the suspension extends, you get a significant amount of toe in that binds the suspension into staying extended until you do something to force it back to normal such as hitting the brakes. Here's where trial and error with toe settings come in addition to making the tie rod assembly longer. By reducing the amount of static toe in will help. I've seen setting toe to zero with Granada spindles after I thought about it. I've even experimented with toe out. Right now it's about 1/16" toe in, I'm running 4* positive caster, 1.125* negative camber along with a bump steer kit. My 66 sits pretty low
 

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Bet we have sold 50 pairs of the 67 C6OA spindles to folks installing on a 64-66. Beware the outer tie rods are different, yes the steering arm is a tad longer, ball joints all same.
Can the alignment issues be resolved, yes with a person that can align a car-A person with true mechanical ability who does not need a computer to tell him what to do.
 

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Can the alignment issues be resolved, yes with a person that can align a car-A person with true mechanical ability who does not need a computer to tell him what to do.
This^^^^
When I installed my Street or Track suspension I had recently moved. I did not know any of the local shops. I began to worry if they would
Bet we have sold 50 pairs of the 67 C6OA spindles to folks installing on a 64-66. Beware the outer tie rods are different, yes the steering arm is a tad longer, ball joints all same.
Can the alignment issues be resolved, yes with a person that can align a car-A person with true mechanical ability who does not need a computer to tell him what to do.
 

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Can the alignment issues be resolved, yes with a person that can align a car-A person with true mechanical ability who does not need a computer to tell him what to do.
This^^^^
When I installed my Street or Track suspension I had recently moved. I did not know any of the local shops. I began to worry if they would F things up and charge me a lot of money or flat out refuse to touch my car. I thought to myself if I just did all this work, why can't I do my own alignment? So I did! I ordered a magnetic spindle mount bubble gauge. Between the instructions which were pretty easy and the very well written Ford shop manual on alignment settings and how it all works, it was pretty easy to do my own alignment. My first ever alignment which was really intended to do a shake down drive, my steering wheel was straight and the car drove really well. I left it that way for a while until I did my disc brake swap with the 72 spindles.

I did have a bump steer issue at first even with the stock 66 spindles. When I did my disc brakes I took care of he bump steer issue.
 

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I have to ask, since you are going from an I6 to a V8. What are your doing for a rear axle? 5 lug rims? Transmission? Driveshaft? Steering components? I6 to V8 fuel line? Engine and its related components (radiator, starter, wire harness, throttle linkage)? Do you have ao donor car?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Wow, thanks for all the response guys. I am doing the following:
1, 302 V8, fully rebuilt, with FiTech injection
2, Tremec T5 box
3, V8 back axle off a 66 (may have to shorten it if the 245 tyres rub.
4, I'm making the Brembo 4-pot conversion for the front myself. Looks really simple, just can't start it until I get one corner assembled.
5, Aluminium I6-V8 conversion radiator
6, EFI fuel tank, providing fuel pressure for the FiTech
7, Fitting American Racing 17x7 & 17x8 wheels, the ones that resemble the original steel wheels.

I've only just got the shell back from the painters, and starting to strip the front suspension, so I can get on with it. My free time is next to nothing though, as I work for myself. I'm an engineer, and I build custom motorcycles and manufacture custom parts. This is why I would rather gather as much intel as possible from you guys, so I don't waste time going in the wrong direction. Yes, it would have been easier to start with a V8, or a 67, but they are rare here ion the UK, and not cheap!

Is there any way I can just fit the whole steering set up off a 67?

thanks again guys, and keep it coming.
 

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The only 67 & later suspension parts you can use are the spindles. The upper control arm while the same length, are wider. The lower arms are longer and the linkage is different.

The basic "tub" of the Mustang from 65 to 70 is the same. In 67, the fenders were made wider, the rear axle was widened 2" and the lower control arms were made longer and upper control arm location changed all for better geometry. The engine compartment size is the same but the shock towers were slimmed down for the big FE motors.

Guys have put the whole 67 & later suspension on the 65/66 but they have swapped most of the front clip.
 
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