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Hi everyone, well, I went by the shop to get the alignment checked and wound up putting the 66 on the rack with the motor running and guy to accelerate for us. Instantly could see the drive shaft had a bad wobble. The head honcho says you need to have the drive shaft balanced. I say, are you sure it's not a bad u-joint? He said he checked and was okay, I said lets look again. Well, lo and behold what was not there a moment ago, was suddenly the problem! Rear joint was bad. Must have gone bad in the year it sat while I restored! :p Anyway, I take it home and back on the ramps and do the colonoscopy...errr-uhhh I mean u-joint replacement on both ends :: Finaly synopsis: still have a small vibration in the seat. One thing I noticed, the pinion yoke where the driveshaft attaches at the u-joint, has quite a bit of in-out motion. I am wondering if I can crank down on the nut and take the slack out of it. I have done this with a cheby before and worked great...just wondering. Thanks. :D
 

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I am wondering if I can crank down on the nut and take the slack out of it.

Yes!
Ford specifications have a minimum torque required to preload the pinion bearings of 175 ft/lbs.
Meaning if you can tighten the slop out of the pinion bearings with less than 175ft/lbs. of torque on the pinion nut, a new crush sleeve and pinion nut should be installed.
 

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Ford specifications have a minimum torque required to preload the pinion bearings of 175 ft/lbs.
Meaning if you can tighten the slop out of the pinion bearings with less than 175ft/lbs. of torque on the pinion nut, a new crush sleeve and pinion nut should be installed.
Art,

Just cruising some messages missed while out of time, and ran across this one. You have a typo, as it should read "Ford specifications have a MAXIMUM torque required to preload the pinion bearings of 175 ft/lbs."

Then, I think you meant to say "Meaning if you can tighten the slop out of the pinion bearings with less than 175ft/lbs. of torque on the pinion nut, a new crush sleeve and pinion nut DO NOT NEED TO be installed".

It's possible I misunderstood you, but I think that is what you meant to say.
 

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As usual, I started speaking before reading the whole thing. The info in my manual is kind of confusing. It says to tighten the pinion shaft nut to a maximum of 175 ft.lbs. while rotating the shaft to insure proper seating. Then, it goes on to say that preload should be 8-12 in. lbs with used bearings. If the torque on the pinion shaft nut is LESS than 175 ft. lbs., after proper preload is obtained, a new collapsible spacer must be used (never back the nut off to reduce preload). Then, to install a new spacer and retorque to obtain the right preload. However, I don't know how you would check the preload with the assembly installed. ::

So, I think he would be OK to tighten the pinion nut up to a maximum of 175 ft.lbs. to remove some of the end play. The problem is that checking preload is impossible without disassembly.

It's probably not worth worrying about too much. I've seen them do this in the shop, and they installed the nut with an impact gun!
 

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You have a typo, as it should read "Ford specifications have a MAXIMUM torque required to preload the pinion bearings of 175 ft/lbs."

No, the information came directly from the Ford service manual.
Minimum torque required to tighten pinion nut to obtain correct pinion bearing preload-----------9" 175*

*If this torque cannot be obtained with a used spacer, install a new spacer
 

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Thanks for the reply. I would certainly defer to the Ford Service Manual since my source was the Chilton's Manual. Go figure......
 
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