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My 66 vert was changed from single exhaust to dual exhaust by the PO. They did NOT do a good job. I have a GT exhaust on order from Waldrons and I just got all the correct hardware from NPD for that style exhaust. I need to add the reinforcement plates. Is this a good project to try my hand at welding? I have access to an Eastwood MIG welder and I have a patient who is a master welder and instructor so I know I can get help. I could have my exhaust person do it when they fab up the H pipe to my Sanderson shorties, but I've always wanted to try welding.

Is this a good idea? Can people help me with the settings? My thought was punching holes in the plate and "spot" welding them in place. Looking for any help, comments, concerns.

Thanks

Peter
 

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My 66 vert was changed from single exhaust to dual exhaust by the PO. They did NOT do a good job. I have a GT exhaust on order from Waldrons and I just got all the correct hardware from NPD for that style exhaust. I need to add the reinforcement plates. Is this a good project to try my hand at welding? I have access to an Eastwood MIG welder and I have a patient who is a master welder and instructor so I know I can get help. I could have my exhaust person do it when they fab up the H pipe to my Sanderson shorties, but I've always wanted to try welding.

Is this a good idea? Can people help me with the settings? My thought was punching holes in the plate and "spot" welding them in place. Looking for any help, comments, concerns.

Thanks

Peter
I think you should absolutely try it yourself. I have an Eastwood 175 mig and on the inside cover it has a chart for various wire speed and heat settings--I find it comes really close to what it needs. I'd get some scrap metal and practice on before the real parts. I did a little gas welding 30+ yr ago so I was basically starting from scratch again but picked it up pretty quickly.
 

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I would not consider it if you do not have a lift. Doing it on your back laying on the floor will get old quickly.
 
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I would not consider it if you do not have a lift. Doing it on your back laying on the floor will get old quickly.
The plates go inside the car under the rear seat. Rosette welds in there would be Welding 101.

Make sure you protect the entire interior from sparks and heat. If the sparks touch the glass, they will destroy it.
 

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Go for it. If you have access to a welder, which you do, and someone who is willing to teach you, then give it a try. If it works out for you, then you can get your own welder and start tackling projects. If it's something you decide you can't do well, and just not interested, then you're not out the cost of a welder - just time. The local community college teaches MIG welding near us, but at the last minute always cancels it, or moves it to another campus an hour away. I want to learn because it's something I can not only do for my vehicles, but also stuff around the house like fencing and gates.
 

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I would not consider it if you do not have a lift. Doing it on your back laying on the floor will get old quickly.
Meh, I welded my first exhaust with an O/A torch on jack stands. :) That was 30 Years ago and I still don't have a lift !
It's fantastic to be able to do your own welding, you'll find it endlessly useful.

edit: I don't always weld fully under the car, you can get it solidly tacked and pull it off to finish if you want.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
As @22GT said, the plates go on the inside behind the rear seat so I don't need a lift. Also I have the car up on Race Ramp Cribs and there is plenty of clearance there.

If I do this, how many holes do I make in the reinforcement plates? Some videos I looked at say to drill 3/16" holes in the plate, correct?
 

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6 holes around the perimeter are sufficient. I think I drilled 3/8'' holes, but I don't think size matters (in this case) they just hold it in place. Seal around the perimeter of the plates afterwards, I used 3m rope caulk.
 

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If you're going to try this, give this video a glance. Jo Daddy has a great youtube presence restoring Mustangs. It's exactly what you're intending to do.

 

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The plates go inside the car under the rear seat. Rosette welds in there would be Welding 101.

Make sure you protect the entire interior from sparks and heat. If the sparks touch the glass, they will destroy it.
I was thinking more for the pipes than for the reinforcing plates.
 

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I agree with many of the comments here. You should learn to weld if you are interested. My local metals supplier has a scrap bin where you can get plenty of scrap to practice on. I looked at taking a class at a local JC, but I felt that spending the $400 for the class would be better spent on a better welder.
If you are hesitant to weld on your car, just do all the clean up and preparation and have the friend/patient do the final welding for you. Even an experienced welder will want to do some test welds to get familiar with the welder.
Depending on how extensive your mods consider a welder one day. I have gotten far more use out of mine that I thought before I bought it.
If all you need is a better job on the exhaust system, do some research with the locals and there is likely a higher end exhaust shop local to you. Yes a better shop will cost more, but the results are worth it.
 

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"Should I try my hand at welding?"
Why ever would you NOT?
Before plunging into car parts, may I suggest a different project? Some kind of decorative steel yard project or something. A metal chicken or whatever sort of thing your wife might like. Doesn't matter. Something not terribly complex but requiring more than a few pieces. The idea being you would be able to get in as much practice as possible one something not structurally important. You don't have to be artistic, find a plan for a bootscraper, a stool, anything. Also some imperfect metal with rust and paint on it would be helpful. People who only ever weld on perfect and new steel get rude surprises when trying to repair old stuff. It's important to start with at least a few brand new practice parts though. You want a fair idea of how things are supposed to go before you go to stuff that's less cooperative.
Having someone to help you get started is gold. Having someone actually there to show you the "sizzle", tell you to slow down, speed u[p, push instead of drag, add more heat, etc, etc, whatever is worth fifty Youtube videos.

Weld some stuff out in the drive where the neighbors can see you and you'll likely get some of them bringing by this or that thing off their lawnmower or whatever you might be able to fix for them. You can be the nice and neighborly cool welder guy or charge them money. Win-win. Or just hide in the garage and happily fix stuff. Ahem.
 
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Wouldn't help much with the pipes themselves, but I'd take a hard look at using body adhesive to install the reinforcement panel. Good Chit.
 

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Meh, I welded my first exhaust with an O/A torch on jack stands. :) That was 30 Years ago and I still don't have a lift !
It's fantastic to be able to do your own welding, you'll find it endlessly useful.

edit: I don't always weld fully under the car, you can get it solidly tacked and pull it off to finish if you want.
LOL....I did my first exhaust, only a couple repairs, with a cheap 110 buzz box stick welder. Don't know what I did but it worked. Felt pretty cocky about it. Next time I tried it I couldn't get a good weld for anything. Finally gave up and had a pro do it. Humbling experience.
 

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If I can do it, anyone can!

Seeing the puddle will be your first hurdle, don't skimp on the helmet!

Do some practice pieces with the same size material and in the same position that you'll be welding in. A little bit of practice, some fine tune adjustments on your machine and you'll be on your way to all kinds of new possibilities.
 

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I'm of the "Don't let fear determine your destiny " school so definitely try welding!
I echo what everyone here has said but especially watch those mig sparks! I remember watching a guy in the body shop I worked about 1980 doing some major mig repairs on a car that was fairly new, and the interior fabric had little holes and most of the glass was damaged. Pretty ugly. The dingleberry's fly pretty far and will leave melt damage on glass instantly. Get your set up right and have some fun!
 

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I use my welder a lot .... have trouble seeing the puddle though. One thing I've learnt doing plug welds, you can't have a gap between the parts being joined, they need to sit flat on each other.
 

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I use my welder a lot .... have trouble seeing the puddle though. One thing I've learnt doing plug welds, you can't have a gap between the parts being joined, they need to sit flat on each other.
Just in case you're not aware, they make cheater lenses for welding hoods, they come in different magnification.
 
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