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Do it. I just took a universal welding course at local adult education center. (Was not cheap) Did a bunch of stick, mig, tig and O/A.
 

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Oh yeah, PSA: NEVER lift your hood to check out a fresh weld unless you're wearing some sort of (safety) glasses. I almost got hot slag in the eye doing that when a cooling weld "popped" at me. Also, try not to wear sneaks or polyester, they can catch fire ! I finally bought a leather welding jacket because I had to do some overhead truck frame repairs where there was just no way to get out of the path of heavy weld spatter.
 

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I've been dying to learn to weld. I drive by a community college twice a day - called them about classes and the wont' talk to you unless you sign up for a several thousand dollar, 2 year course. What ever happened to a community college that has basic or beginner classes? Oh well, I plan on buying a Hobart 500554 Handler 190 MIG Welder 230V soon, and just watching online vids and dinking around with it. I have a couple of cousins that have this one and they say it is a perfect all around welder, especially for cars. It is an investment though...
 

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I didn't know Cheez wheeze was so strong... LOL!
 

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I've been dying to learn to weld. I drive by a community college twice a day - called them about classes and the wont' talk to you unless you sign up for a several thousand dollar, 2 year course. What ever happened to a community college that has basic or beginner classes? Oh well, I plan on buying a Hobart 500554 Handler 190 MIG Welder 230V soon, and just watching online vids and dinking around with it. I have a couple of cousins that have this one and they say it is a perfect all around welder, especially for cars. It is an investment though...
You got a Harbor Freight around you? Get a 20% off coupon (they're always around somewhere) and run down there. You can pick up a $120 flux core MIG welder there. It works. It's plug into any handy 110 volt outlet. With coupon about a hundred bucks. They also have OK autodarkening helmets. Autodarkening helps a LOT when you're trying to learn. These days I won't weld without one. A roll of wire and you're off. Don't like it or want to upgrade later? Sell it on Craigslist and get close to your money back.
People always like to riff on flux core welders. I used one for 20 years and did most of my '67 with one along with innumerable other projects. I recently finally made the move to upgrading it to gas. Sure it's nicer to use and all but I quickly realized I did it wrong. I should have left the MIG flux, bought a second modest MIG for use with gas, and kept both. Actually I'm going to do exactly that anyway. I already miss how I could just grab the little welder and tote it to where I wanted it. Now I have a smallish but still heavy gas bottle that has to go with and a flowmeter that I'm rather paranoid of breaking if/when the bottle falls over. A wheeled cart would help in certain situations but not throwing it in the back of the truck to take somewhere. Plus I now have to worry about running out of gas. With wire it's easy to judge when you need to grab another roll. Gas? Who freaking knows? It runs out when it runs out. (Gotta buy a spare bottle)

So not only do little flux welders have a place, they are super affordable and the skills gained and other equipment move right with you if/when you chose to invest in a bigger and better machine.
 

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Another plus for flux core is you can use it in a breezy condition whereas a situation that might cause you to lose shielding gas ( which can be in a shop with a fan blowing ) with mig will result in some pretty ugly welds. Flux core will require chipping slag when finished.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Oh yeah, PSA: NEVER lift your hood to check out a fresh weld unless you're wearing some sort of (safety) glasses. I almost got hot slag in the eye doing that when a cooling weld "popped" at me. Also, try not to wear sneaks or polyester, they can catch fire ! I finally bought a leather welding jacket because I had to do some overhead truck frame repairs where there was just no way to get out of the path of heavy weld spatter.
Heed this advise. I've taken care of tons of mechanics with metal in their eyes. They really enjoy when I tell them I'm going to take a very tiny die grinder and grind out the metal and rust in their cornea! Wear eye protection and stay out of my office!
 

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Discussion Starter #31
You got a Harbor Freight around you? Get a 20% off coupon (they're always around somewhere) and run down there. You can pick up a $120 flux core MIG welder there. It works. It's plug into any handy 110 volt outlet. With coupon about a hundred bucks. They also have OK autodarkening helmets. Autodarkening helps a LOT when you're trying to learn. These days I won't weld without one. A roll of wire and you're off. Don't like it or want to upgrade later? Sell it on Craigslist and get close to your money back.
People always like to riff on flux core welders. I used one for 20 years and did most of my '67 with one along with innumerable other projects. I recently finally made the move to upgrading it to gas. Sure it's nicer to use and all but I quickly realized I did it wrong. I should have left the MIG flux, bought a second modest MIG for use with gas, and kept both. Actually I'm going to do exactly that anyway. I already miss how I could just grab the little welder and tote it to where I wanted it. Now I have a smallish but still heavy gas bottle that has to go with and a flowmeter that I'm rather paranoid of breaking if/when the bottle falls over. A wheeled cart would help in certain situations but not throwing it in the back of the truck to take somewhere. Plus I now have to worry about running out of gas. With wire it's easy to judge when you need to grab another roll. Gas? Who freaking knows? It runs out when it runs out. (Gotta buy a spare bottle)

So not only do little flux welders have a place, they are super affordable and the skills gained and other equipment move right with you if/when you chose to invest in a bigger and better machine.
Great advice. Think I'll do just that! I was in the camp of "buy a good one now that I will use forever." But in reality I probably won't do a ton of welding so a cheap one for accasional projects should be just fine. If the need arises, I'll upgrade later.
 

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I think you'll find more than one project that needs a "tack" or two, more often than you think. I started my learning in the mid 90s when a body shop gave me an estimate of $15K to replace rusted panels on my mustang. That kicked me in the "arsenal" to begin learning. I still have an Italian gas MIG that I bought from TIP Tools back in the day. Welder & Parts - TP Tools & Equipment
 

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$160.00 this weekend with coupon!
cheap welder
I’d buck up to one that will be able to use gas and flux core. While the one in the post is a good buy it’s more difficult to do thinner material like exhaust tubing with flux core. No problem in doing your bracket though.

I’d get this one and add gas down the road once you get the hang of it. It’s more but a much more versatile machine that’s a better value. The one you posted could limit you down the road and you’d end up getting one like this anyway.
 

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Another vote for adding a magnifier to the helmet. I was having trouble seeing the puddle and staying in line with where the weld needed to be. I bought a 2.0 magnifier and added it to the helmet. Not bad, but not that much better that using my glasses inside the welding helmet without the magnifier. Then I decided to try them together and now I can see the puddle. Also adding a good source of light helps. I bought a HF 1000 Lumen LED work light. The extra light helps tremendously, really sorry I waited so long to buy one.
Old farts need all the help we can get and in this case magnification and more light did wonders.
 

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Absolutely learn how to. If your going to building muscle cars and hot rods you better learn how to weld at least on the stuff stat is not safety related. There are so many good youtube videos to learn from. Get a bunch of scrap metal that you have no emotional attachment to and start practicing. Go to a body shop and get a couple free fenders to cut up and practice welding sheet metal on. Get some 1/8" thick scrap metal and practice on it. I bet in just a couple of days you will be making decent welds on the 1/8" material. Sheet metal is a little harder, at least for me it is.

My problem is I can't see very well after a botched cornea transplant. I bought a big giant water cooled Miller Dial Arc, Tig welder from a neighbor that was moving out of CA (like all my neighbors did). I don't know how to Tig weld but I need to learn for my hot rod projects I just to sit down and learn to Tig weld with it. When I get a spot setup I plan to spend an hour a day practicing until I can do it or I go blind trying.

I have a coupe Lincoln Mig welders, but to do a really nice job on sheet metal you need a Tig welder.
 

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Absolutely get a mig that you can upgrade to gas if at all possible. Take a look at the Everlast brand also, they seem to be fairly well respected in the cheap welder market.
 

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Go for it. I welded a little (very little) years with a cheap welder, no gas, flux. Do not go that route. Go gas shielded, 75/25 mix. Get an auto darkening helmet. Use a light so you can see where you are going to start the arc. I’d imagine there will be a thickness variance between the two pieces of metal, start the arc on the thickest piece and move the weld puddle onto the thinner piece (floor pan). Of it blows through, stitch weld it. I’ve had to stitch weld pans back into a 25.5 car i built this way before and you’ll get the hang of it quick.
My advise, get a good, quality welder first time around because you’ll find you will use it a LOT more than you thought. There are a lot out there in the 125/140 amp range that are quality and will probably do all you want. Go inverter based and you can do more with a normal 110 outlet and 30 amp breaker

I have a Lincoln 140c for this type work and a newer Lincoln squarewave Tig200 for everything else. I’d like to try miller but damn, $$$, and they don’t have anything in my price range that’ll compete with the Lincoln 200 TIG. I love the squarewave but may step up to an bigger Everlast TIG for 3/8 and thicker aluminum. That’s where amperage is needed.
 

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Oh yea, clean bare metal prior to welding! And practice first. Don’t let the first weld you make be on your car. That may not go well
 

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Welding is one of the most useful skills I have learnt.

When I imported my car, it was rust free apart from a small patch needed on one part of the floor pan and a few cosmetic things. I got a local body shop to fix the floorplan and I supplied a replacement panel for him to cut to size and fit. I was very happy with their work and had no complaints. I needed the cosmetic things done and the guy priced it all up. The next day I went out and purchased a MIG welder and have never looked back. The welder cost a fraction of his quote and I still have it decades later.

I am just self-taught and initially, I was terrible on scrap pieces of metal, but I just kept at it and got there in the end. I am no welding god, but I am not bad either. I would go with gas MIG. I have never tried gasless, but everyone was telling me to use gas.

My biggest welding job that I am proud of is my stainless 2.5" dual exhaust system. I wanted a mandrel bent system and places near me were non-existant that could do the work. I purchased loads of prebent pieces and tack welded them under the car ( just on axle stands ) and then welded it properly off of the car. I used 3 bolt flanges every so often so I can dismantle parts of it easily without having to take the whole lot off.

As well as countless things on the car ( repairs, brackets, etc ), I have done numerous other things. My father's lawnmower broke a bracket. The local shop said it is too old and they can't get the parts and tried to sell him a new one. I welded the bracket back together and he has been using it for about 10 years since. My sister broke her gardening fork and I welded it back together. Rust repairs on peoples cars.
 
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