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I have a '65 Convertible that received "show car treatment" from the factory when it was new. The car is one of the 11 Mustangs that were used as ride vehicles on the Magic Skyway during the 1965 season of the New York World's Fair. (12 others were used in 1964). I have done extensive research into the history of this car and as of yet I've been unsuccesful in finding out exactly what "show car treatment" is. The body seam joints have been leaded smooth and I was told that the original paint was wet sanded to produce a smoother/shinier finish. Perhaps someone has heard of this before and can offer some help. Thanks! :eek: Gary
 

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Gary, there is a big article in this months Mustang Times on the skyway cars.

Hate to show my age, but I may have enjoyed a ride through the pavilion in your car. Check for some bubble gum under the seat.
 

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I do not know what particular treatments the cars that you are describing received for the 1964 World's Fair, and you may know more than anyone else since you were the author of that article in the most recent Mustang Times magazine.

However, I do have it on very good authority that back then, a car would be designated to be a special finish car that would be used in special presentations like a tour by the factory, or a special car for show room presentations, and I am told that the fit and finish on those cars did not even resemble that car of the very same make, model and color sitting out on the sales lot. These vehicles were painted with a finer, more meticulous eye, and the employees were instructed to be sure that all the lines were straighter than normal, no flaws or imperfections were tolerated, and basically , they received the "microscope treatment". I know that this is not much, but maybe it helps a little.

Hhhmmmmmmmm.....wonder if this is where the MCA came up with "councous" standards ???

PS..I just got off the phone with my "authority" who was in charge of the paint department at the Atlanta assembly plant for 32 years, and he also informs me that when a car was pulled for "special" treatment, they (he) personally pulled the interior appointments, the fit and finish for the chrome parts, anything and everything that the customer or the VIP the car was being built for. No scratches, no nicks, no chips, no oversprays, nothing was overlooked on these vehicles. Anything visible to the eye was given preferential treatment on these cars. A higher degree of quality was the standard for these "special" cars.
 

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I too have a limited perspective on "Car Show Treatment". I used to work at the Chrysler pre-delivery center in Chicago from 1970 to 1975. Every year the cars for the Chicago auto show would arrive in early December for the late January show. All had the CST paint. So, the factory must have spent additional time for paint and assembly. In reality, they wern't screwed together that much better than the non CST cars were.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
This is great info guys. Thanks for the input. Now it seems that I will have to have a PERFECT car when it's finished!!
 

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Glad I could be of help. However, in response to your response about a "perfect" car, I do not thnk that in this day of judging, there is such a thing as a "perfect" car. Concours or not, I would like for Charles Turner or Laurie Slawson or any of our other resident expert judges (all due respect intended folks, don't take offense to my reference to you ) to respond to this question: Is there a record of how many cars (if any) have ever been a perfect car with NO DEDUCTIONS FOR ANYTHING AT ALL ?
 

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I'm not qualified but I was a judge on Early Ford V8s. Lack of point deductions
is not related to "perfect". In fact we deducted for over restoration!
In the Early Ford V8 judging we would have deducted for leaded seams for
example.
 

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I've never judged a car and given it a perfect score at any show. I'm not aware of any that have achieved that an MCA show, but I know of some that have come very, very close. The best I've done is 7 points off on my coupe at a National. Charles has done better than that.
 
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I've never deducted 0 points on a car. There is no such thing as a perfect car. The best score I ever gave was to Jack Brooks when I judged his '69 CJ convertible. That was just this past year in Concord, CA. Of course, with my limited knowledge of 69-70 cars, there might have been a thing here or there that I missed. About the best score I ever did in 65-68 was around 3-5 points off.

I have heard of some MCA judges giving out perfect scores. A friend's 64.5 convertible that I did final detail work on received 0 points deducted in the concours trailered class. Some unrestored cars have had PLUS points, meaning with their bonus points they were more than 700 points.
 

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Plus points! Hey that's like Michael Jordan hitting 11 out of 10!! :p
 

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1MoTime said:
.........................
Hhhmmmmmmmm.....wonder if this is where the MCA came up with "councous" standards ???

Not really sort of the standards today are a range rather that a specific exact point. All based on a collective experience, exposure and knowledge gathered from original unrestored cars.

Please accept that it doesn't all come down to the
standards or rules but the person applying them ;)


As far as the "perfect car" no I've never judged or seen one but believe they can be built and could be out there. Just haven't found or built it yet ;)
 

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1MoTime said:
I seriously doubt that mine will be perfect either, but we will try our best to come as close as possible !
Yes we all try and most shortcomings are a result of a choice or an oversight.

If we're honest with ourselves we accept that neither we nor the car is perfect. And surely not the judge. Understanding is required all around
 
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