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So, I know a lot of stuff comes from China, and people gripe about it, but after COVID, will Mustang parts houses continue to support China by buying Made in China?

Will they provide a method to ensure that those who never want a part from China again will be able to order without getting anything from China?

Not political, but economic Freedom of Choice.
 

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And I will keep looking for affordable NOS or original (even to recondition), then USA, then North America...
 

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The problem is cost. It's been proven time and time again people choose the cheapest crap. I'm pretty sure I remember reading Rick posting that they offer a better quality and low quality part at NPD (and they note it on their site) and for the same part the majority of sales is almost always the cheaper part. Everyone wants made in USA parts, but few people want to pay for it.

Personally, I will buy the more $ part from NPD because I know better now :)
 

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Don't want to be political, but it will depend on who wins the next election and whether tariffs on made-in-China products continue and/or expand. Businesses need to make long range decisions and the uncertainly of the current tariff situation will delay any movement of production back to the U.S.
 

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Don't want to be political, but it will depend on who wins the next election and whether tariffs on made-in-China products continue and/or expand. Businesses need to make long range decisions and the uncertainly of the current tariff situation will delay any movement of production back to the U.S.
Very little production will come back domestically.

If production moves it will be to other Asian countries.
 

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Very little production will come back domestically.
If production moves it will be to other Asian countries.
Probably true (at least for a while), but at least it takes the money flow away from the CCP, which is a good thing.
 

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Back in the late 70s/early 80s when I was in school for an ME for manufacturing they kept making one point repeatedly. The point was the US was becoming a service economy and within a decade from that point jobs would be largely service based. Right now about 80% of all jobs are service based meaning they are non production/manufacturing based.

In discussions like this many like to claim that somehow offshore manufacturing “took” or “stole” these jobs. What happened was that US companies willingly, gleefully in fact moved production jobs overseas for cheaper labor, lower material costs, less environmental costs and fewer labor protections. The goal was to increase margins and provide lower priced goods as demanded by the market. There was no “taking”. There was a desire for higher profit and lower cost and that lead to the exodus of production jobs.

A fully domestic supply chain isn’t coming back. Over the last few decades trillions of dollars have been invested in refining a global supply chain. That investment would have to be replicated in the US and someone would have to pay for it. Even then raw materials and labor aren’t plentiful here anymore. Labor would be a big challenge. The education of people has turned to supporting service industry jobs. As a result skills like mechanical ability, use of tools and modern manufacturing techniques are in short supply.

Many of those that are left from the manufacturing sector lack experience and education modern manufacturing technologies. When GM shut down Lordstown there was quite a bit of press on the subject. One thing that stood out when the union and state were trying to retrain those that declined offers to relocate were the lack of basic skills to operate current machinery. Many of these more experienced workers went right to the plant out of high school in the 70s or 80s and didn’t get the knowledge required for the higher paying factory jobs in this economy. You can be a $18/20 hour general line labor but to get to the $30/40 hour rates that were common on the Lordstown lines you need CNC skills and the ability to read plans/models and understand things like g-code and how to implement it and use the software that drives these processes. Many of these long time workers on the factory floor had to take $10/12 hour jobs in retail as they weren’t able to grasp the new technology.

The labor isn’t here. The raw materials aren’t here. The investment isn’t going to be made. That’s not going to change.
 

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"will Mustang parts houses continue to support China ... " Kind of a weird way to put it. Parts houses aren't supporting any particular country, they're trying to turn a profit. Faced by competition and thin profit margins most such businesses don't have the luxury of being able to choose. If their customers clamor for the cheapest part and those happen to be found in a particular country then that's where they get them. You can't force customers to buy steak when they want hamburger.
 
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That no companies are interested in producing Mustang body parts with the original tools, may tell that things probably are not as simple as some people may think.
 

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Everything in your life is from China . I wouldn't worry about what's Chinese in your Mustang. China owns our debt. Our whole country is basically a scam to enrich wealth hoarders so they can take the money to Europe when the Chinese come to collect on their investment. With no money to pay them, what do you think will happen?
 

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Everything in your life is from China . I wouldn't worry about what's Chinese in your Mustang. China owns our debt. Our whole country is basically a scam to enrich wealth hoarders so they can take the money to Europe when the Chinese come to collect on their investment. With no money to pay them, what do you think will happen?
Yep
 

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Don't want to be political, but it will depend on who wins the next election and whether tariffs on made-in-China products continue and/or expand. Businesses need to make long range decisions and the uncertainly of the current tariff situation will delay any movement of production back to the U.S.
Not political, but do you really think the next election will be Anything but a landslide for one candidate?
 

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Not political, but do you really think the next election will be Anything but a landslide for one candidate?
So, the big screens being hauled out of Wallyworld the day the stimulus checks landed? I am politically agnostic but I think your putting thought into something that not many put thought into. Best unfulfillable promise the day before the next election wins. We as a country aren't that smart. Oh Crap, that was political! I think they are all morons, if that helps.
 

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Manufacturing jobs are the backbone of a middle class economy. Every country, especially developing countries covet manufacturing jobs.There is a surplus of unskilled labor worldwide. Many manufacturing jobs are repetitive and require a minimal amount of training to become proficient. Medium per capita income in the U.S: $15,480, China:$1,786, India $616, Taiwan: $6,882, Japan: $10,840, S Korea: $11,950, Vietnam: $451. Its easy to see where the manufacturing jobs have gone to and why. Many countries have very lax or non-existent labor, environmental and safety regulations.

The poorest countries add another 80 million people, (births over deaths) to our worlds population every year. The surplus of cheap labor in poor countries continues to grow while the developed countries continue to increase the cost of labor by adding governmental regulations and increasing taxes.
 
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