Vintage Mustang Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,800 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I checked out this sweet 65 convertible on Sat. Nice 100footer, seafoam green, nice paint, a little worse for wear, interior cherry, motor dirty but ran well.

Slid under-different story-both front torque boxes were cheese. Opened the trunk, you could see one shackle through the floor, didn't even bother to look at the other side. I noticed that both rear quarters had been replaced awhile back-Ford parts, but replaced none the less. Owner had it for 12 years, never had a problem with it-and he an emergency room physician.

I told they guy, nothing personal but not only do I not want to pay you $12k for the car, but you are taking your life in your hands drving this thing let alone trying to sell it to someone else.

Long story short, 2-3 years ago I probably would have thought this was a good deal, after all the paint was shiny and the interior was nice.

How far we've (I've) come, but a long way yet to go.

Sorry for preaching.

J. Boggs
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
460 Posts
I know what you mean. I looked at a plain 66 six cly. that had a new floor cemented over the rusted out original. The concrete like substance oozed out the holes before it dried. The car also needed inner wheel wells and had a mouse nest in the glove box. The owner swore that I would never find a mustang that was in better shape, he only wanted $6,500 for it. People seem to notice that a mustang sells somewhere for a high price and that makes their car worth that reguardless of the condition that their car is in. IMO for that price I don't want to have to put major money into fixing the body.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
391 Posts
Hmmm, I wonder:

1) If you as a knowledgeable person could send a (certified?) letter to the “responsible seller” (perhaps a printable electronic form with fill in the blanks) stating your observed structural damage, the possibility of unsafe or marginally unsafe drivable condition, and that a copy of that document became part of a VMF Car Registry; as an option a digital photograph of the car could be included when the form is filled out.

2) The VMF could as a public service maintain an electronic file that sorts by partial or full VIN#, state license plate#, seller name, and person making the observation/complaint. A “password” on the letter would give the same opportunity for the seller to rebut the claim or show that repairs were done. This would be like the VMF; only statements made to be judged by an interested reader.

3) For that matter other features could be added like a paid for structural inspection by someone certified or knowledgeable to do so.

The advantage is that rotten and non-rotten cars get identified on a database available to any Mustang buyer or seller. Given word of mouth and time this type of register would improve value for good cars, lessen chances of some naive person being hurt physically or financially by a rotten car and seller.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,800 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Pardon the chuckle but I looked at your bio and I see that you are a CPA. Your suggestion vaugely reminds me of IRS code.

I dunno, just the phrase caveat emptor works for me but then again I'm an almost 3 year old veteran of the car world. My wife says I ought to start an antique car inspection service-might not be a bad idea-become a VMF certified inspector-Hey Bob, there's a revenue stream.

J. Boggs
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,800 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
and I don't mean to imply that this guy was a crook-in fact I told him to check out the VMF. I just think he thought the car was sound -OK I guess to drive to the grocery store.

J. Boggs
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
391 Posts
John,

I did not think you meant to say the guy was a crook. You said the car is structurally unsound; "I told they guy, nothing personal but not only do I not want to pay you $12k for the car, but you are taking your life in your hands driving this thing let alone trying to sell it to someone else."

What you did not say, is that the guy agreed to check the car out; did you show him the problem areas?

Yes, I am a CPA and have been doing restorations and modifications to Ford products on a part time on and off basis for forty plus years. I sold off my '68 Mustang coupe and '64 260 V-8 Falcon convertible for the money to finish my '67 convertible you see in the picture below.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,800 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Sorry, I should have added that a long of my tongue was in my cheek. Here I bragged about the forum to this guy and then I turn around a trash his car.

J. Boggs
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,204 Posts
I think a lot of folks are REALLY clueless about what they have. It's the Clintonesque definition of what "mint" means.

But I have a friend who saw a 65 289 coupe in the paper for $4000 (of course I will add he DID NOT call me first). Called the number and the owner said "I have a guy on the way to look at it right now." ('magine that).
My bud's reponse? "I'll bring $4000 cash if you hold it for me." (!!?!!?!!?) And he did just that, ran over with $4000 bucks without a quibble.
Needless to say the block was cracked and the car is a rust bucket and it didn't even have a new paint job! Hasn't been off the jack stands since he bought it and he's still looking for an engine.

I no longer wonder who pays the ridiculous prices some of the sellers are asking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,601 Posts
I'm new to the "mustang project" market and plan to purchase a car soon...can someone explain the "torque box" thing...what to look for/where to look? Any other common cancerous areas to pay special attention to?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,800 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Well, I'm not expert but here goes:

Some cars have frames, some cars have torque boxes-I think it's called unibody construction. A frame car has long metal supports that run the length of the body and support the passenger compartment. If you've ever built a car model, you have the frame, and the body. Bad explaining but...

On mustangs, you have sort of an abbreviated frame that essentially connects to the body on both sides front and rear, in front of the rear wheels and behind the front wheels. Looks like a metal box a few feet long and has a sort of ...can't figure out how to describe them..but trust me, you'll know them when you see them. These things are important to the structural integrity of the car. And they are rust magnets. And if they rust, they can be replaced, but you are talking major surgery.

So, by way of diagnosis, if you crawl up under the car and you see rust on these parts and it's not just a little surface rust, start thinking $$$'s to repair. By the way, next to the torque boxes,are the floor pans. Same deal, if they are rusted and you can put a screwdriver through them, same thing, can be replaced, but a healthy cost.

Somebody can probably post a picture of a properly rusted out torquebox-not a pretty sight or you can a book cleverly titled "How to Restore a Mustang" and I think there a some pictures there. Better yet, go check some local cars for sale out, at least 1/2 of them will have bad torque boxes and/or floors.

Good luck. Don't settle for a crappy car with a nice paint job.

J, Boggs
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top