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I have a 66 Mustang coupe straight-six. I am in the process of trying to make a reliable daily driver. It was running great until a couple days ago. Now it won't start. When I turn the key, absolutely nothing happens. All the lights and turn signals work. The starter is good the solenoid is brand new. I cleaned all the connections to the solenoid, starter, and battery. I was told it might be a bad ground, but I checked the cable and it is in perfect condition. I took the ignition switch out and messed with the wires thinking it might be a loose connection, but that didn't work either. The battery is fully charged. The only thing I can think of is a short somewhere near the ignition switch. This seemed to happen when the weather got really hot and humid. Any advice will be greatly appreciated.
 

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Just because the seloniod is new, doesn't mean it is working.
Just becasue the lights are on, doesn't mean the battery has enough juice to start the car.

First try 'jumping' the car by shorting a screw driver across the seloniod. If it turns over, replace the seloniod.
 

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If you have a voltmeter or a test light, disconnect the (brown?) wire from the left side post on the starter solenoid. Have someone turn the key to the start position while you check for voltage. If no voltage, then you will have to work your way back through the ignition switch, power feed, etc.

If you don't have a multimeter and wiring diagrams, now would be a good time to get them. With these cars, these are must-have items.

I once had a starter switch connected to my engine while working on it. When I was done, I disconnected the test switch, closed the hood and drove off. Stopped somewhere and when I went to restart it - nothing. Just as you said. Popped the hood and found that I neglected to reconnect the brown wire to the solenoid.

Hopefully it is something as simple as that.

Frank
 

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"Jumping the Solenoid" means to bypass the ignition switch by using a screwdriver (any metal object will suffice). Use the metal object to temporarily "connect" the positive cable of the battery where it attaches to the solenoid to the first "prong" on the front of the solenoid. Doing this will bypass the ignition circuitry and rule out (or identify) any problems there. If nothing happens when you "connect" these two posts, check your battery for charge and also for good ground. If the engine turns over, suspect your ignition switch after double checking all wiring. When "jumping" the solenoid, the engine will not stay running with the key in the off position, assuming that the ignition switch is good. To keep the engine running without the key on (or any key at all), connect a "jumper" wire from the positive post of the battery to the "+" side of the ignition coil. Make sure the jumper wire is out of the way of any moving parts (alternator) before jumping the solenoid.
 

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To keep the engine running without the key on (or any key at all), connect a "jumper" wire from the positive post of the battery to the "+" side of the ignition coil.
Erm... isn't that a bad thing to do on a stock 6V coil?
 

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Diconnecting the battery to test an alternator on a running vehicle is bad for the alternator, but we do it. Hot dogs are bad for you. Spending $25k to refurbish a 30 year old vehicle is bad, but it's done by the masses. What's your point again?
 

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Spending $25k to refurbish a 30 year old vehicle is bad,
Only 25k? What are you getting cheap in your old age dave?
 

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I do not include myself in "the masses". Spending that much money would be an impossibility for me. There are not enough parts out there that could consume that much of my money.
 

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connect a "jumper" wire from the positive post of the battery to the "+" side of the ignition coil.
It's easier to jumper from the battery to the "I" post of the selonoid. It does the exact same thing, but it's closer (usualy) and you don't have to worry about it getting caught in fans, alternators, belts, etc.
 

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Erm... isn't that a bad thing to do on a stock 6V coil?
Nope. you don't want to run it like that for extended periods of time (assumming he still has a stock coil), but nothing wrong with starting it like that. When you start a bone stock Mustang, it's getting a full 12v to the coil via the red/green wire that goes to the "I" post of the selonoid.
 
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