Vintage Mustang Forums banner

1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,595 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I realize this topic has been beat to death but I'd like some input anyway. I'm getting ready to put new dynacorn doors on a 65, I'm looking to achieve that nice solid sound when closing the doors. Ive used fatmat through the remainder of the car but something tells me that a a spray on sound deadener is going to give me a more solid sound/feel to the doors. What are your experiences?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,597 Posts
I realize this topic has been beat to death but I'd like some input anyway. I'm getting ready to put new dynacorn doors on a 65, I'm looking to achieve that nice solid sound when closing the doors. Ive used fatmat through the remainder of the car but something tells me that a a spray on sound deadener is going to give me a more solid sound/feel to the doors. What are your experiences?
I used fat mat as well, i had alot left over so i just put a big piece inside the door with the window rolled up, then put alot of pieces under the Door panel. I think it made it pretty solid. I am thinking the piece inside the door is the most important. I cant speak for spray ons
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
509 Posts
subscribing

this is a winter project list of mine

I did read somewhere that spray is the preferred method due to water entrapment with matting if the car gets wet/water leaks down the window seals.

I plan to spray mine, just haven't figured out which product to use yet.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,195 Posts
I used some strategically placed Dynamat squares in mine. Couldn't believe the difference it made comparing one door done to other other that wasn't yet. Nice solid "clunk", and no way in heck moisture is gonna be a problem, no way.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
13,016 Posts
I used 2nd Skin, and like 4, it made the doors sound great. BTW, I used an old wooden spoon to get into the hard to reach areas. It worked great.
Stan
 

·
VMF Ambassador
Joined
·
6,590 Posts
I'm firmly in the undercoating/bedliner camp. I sprayed half a can into my doors and they now close more solidly than my modern car. No issues with moisture. Putting matting into the doors is probably fine for most people whose cars never see water, but mine sees quite a bit so I wouldn't ever put anything that could trap water there.

All you need to be doing for the door shells is adding mass to a light panel to stop it from vibrating. If a $5 can of undercoating will accomplish this, might save you a bit of cash (not sure how expensive the FatMat is but usually that kind of material is pretty expensive per foot).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
509 Posts
I used some strategically placed Dynamat squares in mine. Couldn't believe the difference it made comparing one door done to other other that wasn't yet. Nice solid "clunk", and no way in heck moisture is gonna be a problem, no way.
are you placing it on the exterior door skin or the interior frame? I would figure that the exterior would be an entrapment issue where the interior would not.

the bottom inside of the door I will spray with rust convertor undercoating
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,195 Posts
are you placing it on the exterior door skin or the interior frame? I would figure that the exterior would be an entrapment issue where the interior would not.

the bottom inside of the door I will spray with rust convertor undercoating
Exterior skin mostly, and just overkill perhaps but I also custom cut a few curvy bits to fit some inner frame facing areas. My doors are Dynacorn and new, and Dynamat is impermeable to moisture once installed. There is no moisture to be "trapped", and nowhere for a foothold to begin.

I did something a little different in the door bottoms. I sprayed white lithium grease down in there (learned this from BMW), and then Boeshield T-9 over that (non-sticky when dry). Like some other products you could use, as long as it remains undisturbed it will last indefinitely. I will be able to vacuum any debris that may accumulate, and the drain holes remain to do their job.

Like Kelly's Jane my car is intended to go in bad weather and long distances, not fair skies only.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,343 Posts
I tried adhesive mat on the inside of my doors but it came loose after a couple weeks. Went with the spray-on route instead. You want something relatively dense to absorb the sound pulses.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,195 Posts
I tried adhesive mat on the inside of my doors but it came loose after a couple weeks. Went with the spray-on route instead. You want something relatively dense to absorb the sound pulses.
What kind/brand did you try Bart? All I know is that Dynamat is not going to come loose, not unless you want it to and even then it will put up a good fight. I had to remove some due to a floor seat bracket change I made recently and have first-hand knowledge of this. Grrrr.
 

·
VMF Ambassador
Joined
·
6,590 Posts
I can't really see putting a bunch of matting on the interior frame being very useful in comparison to putting it on the door shell. The majority of the "tinny" sound of the door is caused by vibration of the door skin, which is a large panel with relatively little support. So if you were just to put stuff on the interior frame instead of the door skin, I don't think you'd get good results.
 
  • Like
Reactions: rpm

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,195 Posts
I can't really see putting a bunch of matting on the interior frame being very useful in comparison to putting it on the door shell. The majority of the "tinny" sound of the door is caused by vibration of the door skin, which is a large panel with relatively little support. So if you were just to put stuff on the interior frame instead of the door skin, I don't think you'd get good results.
Quite right. The door skin is the target.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,106 Posts
Kelly is correct, the target is the exterior door skin. It is in effect a drum head and will create low frequency drone and a tinny sound when closed due to vibrations. Dynamat, Fatmat, and other asphalt type glue on mats, are very dense and break up the vibration will give you that nice solid sound you are looking for. Other products lick undercoating are less effective but are flexible rubber that will absorb the waves. Besides the sound deadening you want something to insulate against heat & cold. The spray products like Lizard Skin do this very well. Some of the undercoatings will help to a lesser degree. Lastly you want to use a product that will thoroughly waterproof the doors. Zero Rust & Master Series Silver are excellent choices, but even a good epoxy primer will do the job. The inner frame will benefit from fat mat etc, but a layer of aluminum backed foam insulation installed between the door an door panel will make a difference. Also make sure you have good water shields in place. For me the best approach is layered:

1. Hi quality paint applied over properly prepared surface.
2. Dampening mat
3. Spray on undercoating or skin
4. Good heat and noise insulation under the door panel.

When finished make sure the drain holes are clear and water can aasily drain out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,343 Posts
What kind/brand did you try Bart? All I know is that Dynamat is not going to come loose, not unless you want it to and even then it will put up a good fight. I had to remove some due to a floor seat bracket change I made recently and have first-hand knowledge of this. Grrrr.
Generic Ice and Water Shield.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,343 Posts
I sprayed the inside of my doors with Lizard Skin. They went from a hollow tin can sound to a solid "thunk" like a modern car. I couldn't be more pleased with the results.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
632 Posts
For what its worth... dynamat and fat mat are really expensive...
I've sound deadened several cars using Peen n Seal from Lowes/Home Depot.
Same exact stuff. Comes in 30' by 10" rolls for like $25. Its a roofing material that works as well as or better than dynamat. Also a lot easier to install IMO.
 

·
Dimples
Joined
·
4,449 Posts
For what its worth... dynamat and fat mat are really expensive...
I've sound deadened several cars using Peen n Seal from Lowes/Home Depot.
Same exact stuff. Comes in 30' by 10" rolls for like $25. Its a roofing material that works as well as or better than dynamat. Also a lot easier to install IMO.
I did the same thing on my floors. The internet likes to say that there can be an unpleasant odor associated with the cheap stuff, but I used a lot of it over a decade ago and haven't noticed any smell other than the good 'ole vinyl fragrance that all of them have.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
632 Posts
I did the same thing on my floors. The internet likes to say that there can be an unpleasant odor associated with the cheap stuff, but I used a lot of it over a decade ago and haven't noticed any smell other than the good 'ole vinyl fragrance that all of them have.
Yup i agree 100%. Doesn't smell any better or worse than the expensive stuff. I think the metal is thinner too. I dont seem to slice my fingers as much with Peel n seal.
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top