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Discussion Starter #1
Okay, I'm about to tackle the brake work on the 68 coupe. It has manual drums. What special tools do I need? Looking at the shop manual, the bent 3/8ths wrench for bleeding is obvious, but what else? Does NAPA or Craftsman make everything I need?
TIA,

James

1965 convertible "White Pony", my own lesson in mechanical humility
1968 coupe "Jedstang" for the soon to be 16 y/o boy
 
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You really don't need any special tools. There are some tools on the market for removing and installing brake shoe retaining and return springs, but I have never found them necessary. I don't hone brake cylinders anymore as replacement ones are pretty inexpensive. Removing bearing races can be done with a punch.
I would suggest replacing all the brake hardware, and the drums if they show any signs of overheating, or are approaching the recommended wear limits.
 

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All I need to replace the brake pads, besides a jack, jack stands, and a tire iron, is a good pair of channel locks and a flat tip screwdriver. The channel locks give you the leverage you need to remove and replace the springs and you'll need the flat tip to pry that little horseshoe looking thingy that attaches the e-brake to the pad in the rear as well as adjust the brakes. You can buy the special tools but you don't necessarily need 'em. It's pretty easy. Once you start you'll figure it out OK. Do one side at a time so you have a reference to tell you how it should look. Just remember the two sides of the axle and spindles are mirror images of each other, respectively.

Black primer 66 coupe, bench seat, 68 302-2V, C-4, 3.55 TSD
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I've always just used some vise-grips and a couple of screwdrivers for brake work (besides the obvious wrenches or sockets) but there are special tools for working with the springs and linkages...I'm just too cheap to buy them...*G*

Most large auto parts stores will have them....

If you're rebuilding your wheel cylinders, then you'll need a brake cylinder hone...

It might be worthwhile to check your front wheel bearings if you've had the car awhile and haven't re-packed them...obviously, if you have to machine the drums, the shop will pop the bearings and clean everything...

Yeah, your local NAPA store can likely get you all you need and do the drum machining to boot...

Pat
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Well, I'm going to go against what everybody else has said, and say to get the tools. Basically, there are only two tools, one for the springs and retainers that keep the shoes against the backing plate, and another that will remove the retracting springs. There isn't much to them, so even if you just get Harbor Freight or Napa brand, you shouldn't have any problems, and you should be able to get both for around 10 dollars. I just think that they pay for themselves in the long run.

-Brian
 
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I'm with Restomod. I broke down and spent $8 to get a double-ended brake tool several years ago. One end takes the springs off, one end gets 'em back on. I'd previously used the screwdriver/vise-grips method, which can get irritating. The tool works great -- it'll save you some busted knuckles and your wife/kids/neighbors from hearing you cuss like a sailor when you draw blood.

'67 cpe, daily driver
 

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being your first time i would recommend jacking both front or back wheels and placing them on jack stand, tqke off both wheels and drums. Now work on one side and use the other one as a reference as to what it should look like when your all finished. It gets slightly confusing once you have one completely disassembled. There should be no reason to bleed the braked if your just changing pads and your just looking for trouble if you bleed the brake system and have no real need.

If the brakes have worn till the rivets on the brakes have worn into the drum you will need to pull like hell to get the drums off. The drums will also have to go to the local machine shop to be turned, if they don't have grooves worn in them i would not have them turned.

When you finish be sure you pump your brakes a few times before you start off driving otherwise the pedal will go to the floor the first time you hit it after doing the brake job.

Motor
 
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doc, pick yourself up a handheld brake spring tool (I think that's what you call it). Your thumbs will thank you later. basically it's like a screwdriver but you use it compress the brake springs that hold the shoes to the vehicle. otherwise you'll have to use your thumbs to compress the springs which can be difficult and definitely annoying. they run about 8 bucks and you can probably get it at your local parts store. i've done it both ways with and w/o the tool...go with the tool.

tiimmy p
67 hardtop
 

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I've learned from a old timer FORD mechanic to replace the wheel cylinders every other brake job. Otherwise your finished brake job could get leaky wheel cylinders. They take a "set" and a new brake job will reposition the wheel cyl pistons. Getting brake fluid on new shoes is a pain. This is the voice of multiple experiences trying to take short cuts.
 
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