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Interesting! My pump has no foam sock. Where did you get your fuel resistant foam from? I'd like to get some for mine as well to see if that quiets it at all.
the foam is PE (polyethylen) like the anti slosh foam cubes in racing tanks.
 

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the foam is PE (polyethylen) like the anti slosh foam cubes in racing tanks.
Hi Markus

I have the tanks inc. tank also with a 255l walbro and has always been noisy from day one. It did not have a foam covering come with the kit to put over the pump nor did I install one. I am thinking of putting one on it to see if it will quieten it down. Does yours have a loud noise on initial prime.? Mine does and after running it is not as loud but u can still hear it sounds like it is pulsing.

Thanks
 

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I am on my third pump for my spectra efi tank. I can 100% say that they are Walbro gerotor style pumps and not no name knock offs. the first two failed very quickly (within first 3 months) because of the pulse width modulation with the FiTech, after I realized that was the issue, the third pump has been working flawlessly and quietly since installing and the PWM being turned off. The first two were both replaced under warranty by rockauto with no issues. I spent a lot of time diagnosing the noise and made calls to Walbro tech and the company that actually makes them TI Automotive, this style pump is also sensitive to voltage, so make sure you have adequate voltage with good connections, and a very good ground. Supposedly this pump is a very commonly used pump in many different applications.
 

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I replaced my pump with the same one recommended by @cj428mach, night/day quiet and i also had issues with starvation that were solved with this pump as well. I went through 2 spectra walboro before I bit the bullet and went with the aem it’s a direct swap.


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My spectra sock was contaminated with something so I ran to autozone with the spectra and they found me another one in stock. Was slightly longer but worked great. If spectra sock wasn't messed up I would've reused it.
 

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you need to let the tank breath with more vent way beyond the original cap.

an in-tank fuel pump is basically a heater sitting in your fuel.

also with a return style system, the heat gathered in the fuel as it passes through the hot engine compartment is then transferred to the tank. the fuel will keep getting hotter and hotter.

if you are running EFI, then the pump is working even harder compared to a carb setup with an in-tank pump and a return. the more work the pump does (e.g. working against 45psi versus 6 psi), the more heat it generates.
 

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Per fitech, if you kill the engine, wait 5 minutes then release the gas cap, if there's no hiss or whoosh of air then the tank is venting adequately and there's no need for additional venting or concern.
 

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you need to let the tank breath with more vent way beyond the original cap.

an in-tank fuel pump is basically a heater sitting in your fuel.

also with a return style system, the heat gathered in the fuel as it passes through the hot engine compartment is then transferred to the tank. the fuel will keep getting hotter and hotter.

if you are running EFI, then the pump is working even harder compared to a carb setup with an in-tank pump and a return. the more work the pump does (e.g. working against 45psi versus 6 psi), the more heat it generates.
How do you think a TBI system would work with a regulator near the tank and the TBI deadheaded? These are examples; HOLLEY EFI FILTER REGULATOR , LS Fuel Filter Regulator .

Sniper and FiTech run about 60 PSI.
 

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How do you think a TBI system would work with a regulator near the tank and the TBI deadheaded? These are examples; HOLLEY EFI FILTER REGULATOR , LS Fuel Filter Regulator .

Sniper and FiTech run about 60 PSI.
I don't have experience with those or a setup with a regulator on the opposite side of the vehicle. My initial thought would be a lack of response with a regulator that far away (meaning with a surge of fuel use it may delay responding), but I have no experience to verify that situation. My experience is with bypass regulators within a few inches of a carb using walbro and aeromotive in tank pumps (and I have cooked a walbro).
 

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I reused the spectra sock, the AEM sock would have worked but the Spectra sock has a longer neck and would sit lower in the tank.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
you need to let the tank breath with more vent way beyond the original cap.

an in-tank fuel pump is basically a heater sitting in your fuel.

also with a return style system, the heat gathered in the fuel as it passes through the hot engine compartment is then transferred to the tank. the fuel will keep getting hotter and hotter.

if you are running EFI, then the pump is working even harder compared to a carb setup with an in-tank pump and a return. the more work the pump does (e.g. working against 45psi versus 6 psi), the more heat it generates.
how should i add additional venting to my tank?

I just have regular twist cap -- i'm assuming if theres a way to attach an additional vent line to the fuel filler neck? has anyone done so?
 

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Question: The discussion about adding another fuel vent, are you expecting to vent excess pressure or to prevent the build up of a vacuum? I'm confused about how the discussion of heat building in the fuel leads to a solution of adding additional venting.
 

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I'm not sure you guys understand what the vent does exactly. It's about equalizing the pressure in the unfilled portion of the tank, which is more about the pump pulling fuel (air replaces fuel) out of the tank without creating a vacuum. The same mechanism prevents the return from pumping into a pressurized tank, but this would not make your pump work harder because it's already pumping into pressure due to the fuel pressure regulator. The return is pretty low pressure, it's what is bled off from the fuel pressure regulator. Yes, the return must be efficient, and a proper vent will help this, but the lack of a proper vent makes your pump work harder, and generate more heat, because it's pumping out of a vacuum.
 

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All this talk about an in-tank efi pump getting hot and fuel getting hotter and hotter....I thought, and have been told over and over, that the efi pump and re-circulation actually cools the fuel and keeps the pump cooler. Now, WTH is it? Lets get this straight once and for all. I do have the efi tank w/in-tank pump and have never had the original fail...BUT, have had the inline type efi pumps fail....3 times. That is why I finally just got the efi tank. :crybaby:
 

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Here's the tank vent I used. I've seen people simply add a bung on the fuel neck, route some 3/8 fuel hose to this vent valve. My "Rick's Tank" had a 3/8 pipe thread fitting I used a 90° out of the tank, 3/8 rubber fuel hose, and routed this vent valve as high as possible in the wheel well area.

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/tnk-vvr/overview/
 

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Question: The discussion about adding another fuel vent, are you expecting to vent excess pressure or to prevent the build up of a vacuum? I'm confused about how the discussion of heat building in the fuel leads to a solution of adding additional venting.
both, pressure or vacuum.

for a situation for needing vent for a vacuum condition.

for a situation like a street car where heat is transferred to the fuel from the pump, heat is transferred from the engine compartment, heat transferred to the fuel from exhaust pipes routed next to the fuel tank will cause expansion of the gases and temps can continue to rise as time continues (more so when the car is not moving due to less airflow through the engine compartment and around the fuel tank). Fuel usage is not that rapid due to more idling/cruising as compared to burst down the dragstrip. this scenario will probably lend itself to a higher probability of needing a vent for a pressure buildup situation. put a plastic fuel container full of gasoline in the heat of the sun and watch it expand.

if you have a heat/pressure buildup issue, you will probably hear the air trying to escape. consider measuring the temperature of your gas tank with a thermocouple of an IR gun (if you use an IR gun, don't shoot it at shiny metal, but use some black tape).

FROM MY PERSONAL EXPERIENCE for my setup, i had a lot of heat in the tank and it was producing some pressure in the tank. I did a number of things to reduce the temp rise (or actually try to slow it down) for my system in an attempt to not burn up future pumps. For the vent, i originally had a two way vent valve. I don't really think it worked that well for whatever reason. I welded a bung near the top of the filler tube for a barbed fitting. then ran a hose along the top, along the quarter and then down.



 

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Would something like this solve fuel tank vent issues?

Here is an adapter that splices into the filler neck hose. There are several versions of this and also ones that fit a hole drilled into the filler neck itself. Basically, just a barb to attach a hose. Moroso EFI Fuel Return Line Kits 65385



A hose could be run to a vent. There are vents with check valves and open vents. I was thinking a discreet vent could be just under the edge of the trunk lid where it would be out of the elements but outside of the trunk weatherstripping. Or something along that line. Eddie Motorsports Fuel Vent Valves

 

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All this talk about an in-tank efi pump getting hot and fuel getting hotter and hotter....I thought, and have been told over and over, that the efi pump and re-circulation actually cools the fuel and keeps the pump cooler. Now, WTH is it? Lets get this straight once and for all. I do have the efi tank w/in-tank pump and have never had the original fail...BUT, have had the inline type efi pumps fail....3 times. That is why I finally just got the efi tank. :crybaby:
for a dead head system, the fuel in the line near the carb is not flowing much at all (assuming cruise/idle) and barely flowing. therefore this fuel is sitting in the heat of the engine compartment rising rapidly because it's hot in there (also add in the heat of a mechanical fuel pump attached to the hot engine block hammering away at the fuel, increasing heat). the rest of the fuel system is much cooler as it gets away from the engine compartment.

a return system will continually flow fuel, so it won't get the type of hot spot described above. however, the average temperature will continue to rise throughout the system due to exposure to heat in the engine compartment and from the pump itself.

so yes, a return system can reduce hot spots, but the average temp will rise with time.

also, some in tank pump setups won't necessarily have the pump submerged in fuel. i have a Tanks setup, and the fuel in the tank probably needs to be about 2/3 filled to cover the pump with fuel (ignoring slosh).
 
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