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Discussion Starter #1
From my research it seems the early (pre-Mustang) spring perches were bronze (oilite?) bushings that were changed to rubber.

Then it looks like a John Dinkel thought of using bearings. My guess is he is a machinist and applied a machinist solution.


I don't know when that happened but these days (actually for a while) there are several materials that may work the same as roller or ball bearings. A roller bearing seems like overkill.

I have seem mention of polyurethane, urethane or elastomer but these are more for rubber replacement and won't offer the bearing like properties that are needed.

Has anyone heard of using UHMW or Delrin? These are relatively inexpensive and offer better performance that bronze and without the need for lubrication.

Just take out the bushing, measure it and replace it with UHMW.

Or take the Drake one and replace the elastomer with UHMW.


Thoughts?
 

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Dimples
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It may in fact be overkill to go with bearings, but it certainly does the job better than the factory rubber.

I went with the SD “performance” perch due to budgetary constraints, and am very happy with them. Noticeably better than stock. With more budget, I would go with the roller bearing from Street or Track/Opentracker because it’s a known quantity with a history of lasting quality and both companies offer outstanding service.
 

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Roller bearing perches made a noticeable difference in ride and handling. I love 'em.
 
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@66conv6 and @RestoMike66
Can you elaborate? I replaced my stock suspension with SD stuff and I have the same spring perches as @BlakeTX . How did the roller ones improve the ride?
 
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1966 Mustang GT 4sp Nightmist Blue
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@66conv6 and @RestoMike66
Can you elaborate? I replaced my stock suspension with SD stuff and I have the same spring perches as @BlakeTX . How did the roller ones improve the ride?
Have them side by side and you will see. There isn’t any resistance or binding.

Chris
 

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I have the roller perches from Street or Track (which I'm pretty sure are the same units from Opentracker Racing). Yeah, they're really spiffy. While more costly than the factory style perches, in the grand scheme of things, it's the proverbial budget dust. Now, for a mass manufacturer it's a ginormous difference. For one car, no big deal. I see no reason to produce something a little less expensive.
 

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Dimples
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@66conv6 and @RestoMike66
Can you elaborate? I replaced my stock suspension with SD stuff and I have the same spring perches as @BlakeTX . How did the roller ones improve the ride?
The roller and Performance perches rotate freely. Hold it by the pivot and it will click-clack back and forth easily. The stock perches require a bench vise to rotate. It really is a night and day difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I have the roller perches from Street or Track (which I'm pretty sure are the same units from Opentracker Racing). Yeah, they're really spiffy. While more costly than the factory style perches, in the grand scheme of things, it's the proverbial budget dust. Now, for a mass manufacturer it's a ginormous difference. For one car, no big deal. I see no reason to produce something a little less expensive.
Significantly less expensive.

Roller spring perches such as the ones from Opentracker are $200. I would guess that by using Falcon perches and UHMW you would be around $75, with possibly equal or better performance.
 

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Have them side by side and you will see. There isn’t any resistance or binding.

Chris
Scott Drake makes two styles, the rubber ones as stock replacements ($28/ea) and HD ones that utilize an elastomer that allows the pin to freely rotate ($58/ea) It's probably not quite as good as one with bearings, but it is half the cost and still allows the perch the freely pivot.
 

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I went from trashed original perches to Open Tracker's roller bearing perches and the difference was not at all subtle. The bearings move much more freely and as a result, cornering is more predictable and ride quality/handling is improved overall.

Important to note: the roller bearings feel like they effectively decreased my spring rate because the front end travels much more freely now. The 620 spring/roller perch almost feels lighter than the stock spring/rubber perch combination.

I wish my Konis were adjustable for bump and not just rebound (though I haven't fussed with them).
 

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Discussion Starter #12
It may in fact be overkill to go with bearings, but it certainly does the job better than the factory rubber.

I went with the SD “performance” perch due to budgetary constraints, and am very happy with them. Noticeably better than stock. With more budget, I would go with the roller bearing from Street or Track/Opentracker because it’s a known quantity with a history of lasting quality and both companies offer outstanding service.
Did you notice how easily the shaft moved with the elastomer bushing?
 

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I’ve run the stock type, single roller and dbl roller. There is such a difference between the stock and roller it’s crazy. If you get rid of all the rubber up front and go with bearings, the suspension is no longer bound up and is free to flow with the dynamics of the car at speed.

You can actually buy the parts from John and build them yourself. Hell, the plans are out there so you make them from scratch.

If you want a better handling car, but want to keep it stock appearing, John (and Shaun) can hook you up. All of their parts are road and track tested.

Yes, I am using/testing parts from both.


Mark
 

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Dimples
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Did you notice how easily the shaft moved with the elastomer bushing?
Yes, that’s what I’m saying. Brand new and uninstalled, they moved as freely as my buddy’s roller bearing perches. That said, I don’t have any data on how well/poorly they last in the long term. I’ve had them a few years and probably +/- 2k miles. So far so good.
 

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Dimples
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Important to note: the roller bearings feel like they effectively decreased my spring rate because the front end travels much more freely now. The 620 spring/roller perch almost feels lighter than the stock spring/rubber perch combination.
That was a big takeaway for me too with the SD performance version. Everything got smoother with less harshness.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
That was a big takeaway for me too with the SD performance version. Everything got smoother with less harshness.
Still they are $120+ for the pair. I think I get get the same performance for the half that price.
 

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Dimples
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Still they are $120+ for the pair. I think I get get the same performance for the half that price.
You may. Maybe you have a lot of confidence in your own craftsmanship to swap bushings. For me, it wasn’t worth the time and effort to experiment with it. That was an easy $120 to spend, and the results were certainly worth it.
 

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This isn’t really an arguable point. Bearings free up suspension to perform at its optimum. If that is important, then this is a minimal investment. If racers are saying “night and day” difference, then I’m sold.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
This isn’t really an arguable point. Bearings free up suspension to perform at its optimum. If that is important, then this is a minimal investment. If racers are saying “night and day” difference, then I’m sold.
I think I could have been more clear. I understand why they need to move freely, I was questioning why go to the expense of bearings when there are other options that give the same performance for less cost.
 
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