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Yes, that’s what I’m saying. Brand new and uninstalled, they moved as freely as my buddy’s roller bearing perches. That said, I don’t have any data on how well/poorly they last in the long term. I’ve had them a few years and probably +/- 2k miles. So far so good.
I went with the SD elastomer perches and have been pleased with their performance. I have about 20K miles on them so far with no apparent wear. They are also have a grease zerk for yearly maint.
 

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1965 2+2 Vintage Burgundy A-code C4
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I get it, and my response is more my statement than an advocation for your actions. If you have the skills and the other bushings will give you enough free movement, by all means go for it. Any friction bushing is not going to be as free as a bearing, that’s just science. At least short of some space age stuff and that would throw the budget out the window. For ME, this is my front suspension whereas all things critical occur. I’m going to optimize this key area to the best of my ability. That’s roller perches. For the return on performance versus cost, this is quite a deal in my mind. But again, that’s ME.
 

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I was thinking the same thing. I especially like the properties of delrin.

I decided not to experiment and just buy a roller perch kit from daze cars. I basically paid a little for someone else to test a design on the race track. It was $57 with shipping for both perches. The welding was very difficult because it is a T joint and with thick metal to very thin metal. For a lot of people it's probably not worth so much time and effort to make them but I'm happy with my perches.
 

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I was also wondering how fast delrin would wear. It would be a real pain to remove the perches and check them at short intervals.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
I was also wondering how fast delrin would wear. It would be a real pain to remove the perches and check them at short intervals.
I wouldn't any wear at all for these materials. They are both hard and self-lubricating. Insert your own dirty smirk here.
 

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Un-encapsulated Delrin will cold-flow out of there under time and pressure..... and there's plenty of pressure involved.
You'd have to "trap" the Delrin. It's far easier to do a bearing design, that's why you see them.

The first spring perches were originally steel-on-steel on the early Fairlane, with a grease fitting and for GM, a steel shaft with a threaded sleeve that rotated into the perch housing on the Chevy II.
(leave it to Chevrolet to over-complicate that deal) The GM and Ford perches have almost identical bolt spacing. You know the engineers were all looking at each others' work.....

ex-Global West GM
1991-1995
 

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I went from trashed original perches to Open Tracker's roller bearing perches and the difference was not at all subtle. The bearings move much more freely and as a result, cornering is more predictable and ride quality/handling is improved overall.

Important to note: the roller bearings feel like they effectively decreased my spring rate because the front end travels much more freely now. The 620 spring/roller perch almost feels lighter than the stock spring/rubber perch combination.

I wish my Konis were adjustable for bump and not just rebound (though I haven't fussed with them).

Same here. Plus I have a mono bearing lower control arm too. The reduction in binding I never thought about. I had GT spec coils in my front. I'm not a big guy, I weigh 170 pounds. Just sitting on the front fender quickly by the headlight, I could bottom the suspension. With my brother in the car, well he's not like me, about 250, just sitting in the driveway not moving I was bottomed out. Reluctantly I installed .620", 600# SD coils with a half coil cut off. I thought they would be too stiff. But much to my surprise, very compliant. Much more then I thought. It's firm but definitely not harsh or unpleasant. You probably wouldn't think twice they were too stiff. I wouldn't want to run them on a stock suspension.
 

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67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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I would imagine because Delrin or UHMW won't hold up under the load with the given available small surface area. Simple.

Edit- err, what GT289 said while I was typing.. :)
 
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Significantly less expensive.

Roller spring perches such as the ones from Opentracker are $200. I would guess that by using Falcon perches and UHMW you would be around $75, with possibly equal or better performance.
Still budget dust for one car...
 

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The Scott Drake performance spring seats are an affordable alternative to the full rollers for the average Mustang guy. You can spin them 360º by hand out of the box. Makes putting in coil springs 1000% easier. Just sold my pre- going full SoT coil over set in the for sale section. Good value for the average Mustang restorer, and I normally hate SD stuff!
 

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I've been using the polly bushing kit in my perches for 15 years or so they move very freely when lubed with silicone grease . Maybe the bearings are better but wasn't in the budget . 20 bucks vs a couple hundred
 

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Decide what spring perch you want now because later on, if you change your mind, it’s going to be a hassle to change them again. I tend to spend more on parts that are a pain to get to so I don’t have to redo them at a later date.

Better to spend a bit too much now. You will be happy and as time moves on you’ll forget the cost. If you spend too little you’ll remember EVERY time you drive the car.
 

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Rotating them in your hand doesn't say so much. It's the ability to rotate under ~1500 pounds of load (front wheel load times the control arm leverage) that matters. Plastic bushings deform to some degree and will tend to stick before starting to move, resulting. All depending on bushing design, material, lubrication etc.

I have home made bronze bushings in mine. Although they work fine, I can't honestly say that the difference was huge after replacing the poly bushings (that had a tendency to move out of place) and not very smooth shafts that I had before. Maybe I should try a set of those magic roller perches instead :)

BTW, rubber bushings do not add friction, but they add to the spring rate of the suspension. Spring perches with rubber bushings do put the shock in a bind, which increases the friction of the shock

Rubber Bushings – How They Work
Rubber bushing rotation

Rubber Bushing
Rotates via Deformation
For all their faults, rubber bushings allow suspension movement with very little friction. Rubber bushings do not slide in their mounts, they accommodate movement by deforming in a twisting motion. There is no friction surface hence the friction is very, very low. Rubber bushings resist movement due to the spring rate of the rubber, not friction. Their behavior is similar to a torsion spring though the spring rate is small.
 

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Just replaced everything except the front springs on my 67 vert 6cyl with aftermarket non oem parts . .Numours rollerized parts from open tracker. Probably most parts people would not put on a 6 cyl car but the car drives & handles like a dream.
 

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I think I could have been more clear. I understand why they need to move freely, I was questioning why go to the expense of bearings when there are other options that give the same performance for less cost.
Short answer:
I will am very likely to use all the roller parts because it keeps the thing looking original while improving what is hidden.
Long winded theory:
Each of us has decisions to make along a sliding scale between totally original and full on restro-mod.
My car happens to have that "old man been driving from new and never changed anything" vibe, yet I want to daily drive and keep up with new vehicles in comfort, handling, reliability..
The result is, I upgrade things that can not be seen or that make such a difference I am willing to make the change...
Examples = 4 wheel disk brakes (as long as I keep my 14" steel with hubcaps no one can see but the safety upgrade was needed), the original radio retrofit with new components including bluetooth, the original air cleaner while running a new edelbrock carb, not restoring the paint interior or exterior because the wear on them is real, will probably use the foam/covers with higher bolsters on the seats.
 

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67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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I didn't really care for the "roller" bearing setup and so made my own version using needle bearings instead. In large part because I have the tools to do stuff like that and enjoy the process.
 
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