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Does any company make a stainless steel version of the stock air cleaner mounting stud and wing nut which looks like the original?

Something like this but in stainless?
 

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I doubt if any one does and grade of stainless would be important. Given those new aftermarket studs are probably cheap Chinese steel I would not put one on my car. Why? My air cleaner stud fatigued while going down the highway. It snapped just above the carb and then vibrated out of the nut and down the carb the broken stud went. Resulted in a bent valve and hole in the block. :O
My new setup has the stud epoxied to the nut to form a wing-bolt and unscrew the wing bolt from the carb. Granted, what happened to me was probably 1 in a million, but none the less...
 

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^^ sounds like that got over tightened.
 

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^^ sounds like that got over tightened.
Given how flimsy a Hipo style air cleaner lid is, I doubt it was too tight. Years of vibration more than likely. I cannot recall if that stud came with my Holley or not. Too long ago.
 
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I doubt if any one does and grade of stainless would be important. Given those new aftermarket studs are probably cheap Chinese steel I would not put one on my car. Why? My air cleaner stud fatigued while going down the highway. It snapped just above the carb and then vibrated out of the nut and down the carb the broken stud went. Resulted in a bent valve and hole in the block. :O
My new setup has the stud epoxied to the nut to form a wing-bolt and unscrew the wing bolt from the carb. Granted, what happened to me was probably 1 in a million, but none the less...
Ouch! The same thing happened to me on the Pantera! When I was putting the newly rebuilt engine back in the car I thought, "this seems like a poor design as the stud could break or vibrate loose and go down the carb." Then I figured it must not be an issue since just about every car from the 30's through the 70's did it this way and I had never heard of it happening. But to be safe, I lock-nutted the stud onto the carb body. Unfortunately, there was some contact between the rear decklid and the air cleaner (due to an aftermarket intake manifold) which put a slight bit of torque on the air cleaner stud. The vibration over 3500 miles of driving work-hardened the stud and caused it to crack. It then vibrated loose from the wingnut atop the air cleaner and went down the carb throat and into the #8 cylinder - it collapsed the piston, bent the rod, and cracked the cylinder wall. When I posted to one of the Pantera forums, I heard from at least 6 or 7 other members who had all had similar experiences. Several reported they only use bolts for the air cleaner now, or they tack welded the wingnut to the stud so the stud can't fall into the carb as it's captured by the air cleaner lid.
 

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I use a threaded standoff that threads over the rod. What appears to be a nut at the top is actually molded into the standoff. The whole assembly is two parts and very strong.
737473
 

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Discussion Starter #8

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I use a threaded standoff that threads over the rod. What appears to be a nut at the top is actually molded into the standoff. The whole assembly is two parts and very strong.
Do you have a write up on how you made this?
 

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Dissimilar metals don’t play nice together. Oxidation can lock the pieces together.


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Discussion Starter #11
Dissimilar metals don’t play nice together. Oxidation can lock the pieces together.


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Roger that steel does react with aluminum and can seize. But i dont understand how stainless steel would react to aluminum in a worse way than mild steel?
 

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Been a long time since HS Chem class. I just watch out for pairs that are too far apart on any of the many galvanic scale charts available. There are lots of grades of stainless and some are less reactive with aluminum. Easier just to avoid than to get that specific.
 

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With all due respect, I think way too much thought is going into this simple task. Mounting an air cleaner on a carburetor is not rocket science. I have stainless steel valve cover fasteners in aluminum heads, SS bolts holding brackets to my aluminum intake manifold and numerous other places and never had a problem with the chemistry! BTW- I read back through this thread and could not find anywhere that the OP stated that the carb body was aluminum.
 

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I'm sure no one took any offense, but I hope no one is offended if I ask what carburetor commonly used on the vintage Mustang isn't made of aluminum / potmetal.
 

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You're right, although most carbs are potmetal. They can (and do) contain aluminum. There are also true aluminum carbs. I own an aluminum body Holley Street Avenger and can say without hesitation that it runs cooler than any potmetal carb I've ever run. There are distinct differences.
 

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STAINLESS steel will gall aluminum threads and you'll get galvanic corrosion. If the zinc plating extends into the hole you should be okay. Plain steel does NOT gall aluminum. A "solution" to your potential issue would be the use of a carburetor stud that is threaded above the level of the air horn and to braze a jam nut at the appropriate level, as well as use threadlocker. That should keep it in place.
 
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