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I would say it's rather hopeful that any official would know the law regarding this, even in their own jurisdiction.
I agree, and it's sad. You'd probably have to contact State AG offices to get official, written policies regarding car restoration affecting VINs. I just get the feeling that since I can't find any State DOT / DMV websites with official "go ahead and re-stamp!" policies, then it's understood by law enforcement to be blatantly illegal.

As for "discovery" of a re-stamped VIN, I'd guess that's unlikely in the extreme.
By some State officer who knows nothing about Mustangs or classic cars? Oh, I agree totally! But just getting a vehicle registered for a tag is a Very Low Bar. Obviously, resale value is pretty important to most folks given how much money is involved. The person who must be fooled someday is a wary expert buyer. While it's very easy to fool newbies, ethically that's also a Very Low Bar. Then there's the high-dollar cars. Criminal fraud and civil lawsuits become a serious concern long after the car is sold.

Perfect forgeries which cannot be detected are certainly possible, but it's extremely difficult to execute. I've spotted many suspect VINs both in person and in photos posted on the web. For me, it's an overall "Spidey Sense" thing more than specific font details (although that's often part of it). The most common foul I see are VINs stamped with individual punches and a hammer. It's the easiest apporach, but are also easy to identify due to incorrect spacing, depth, fonts, and deformed surrounding metal.

We have gone over this many times, even broken it down by state.
Wow! I follow this topic closely, but your list is new to me. Thanks for the information! I will visit the AAMVA web site for more recent updates if possible. I can't believe none of my web searches ever hit that site.

From my first glance, it looks like most States (like mine) are either completely vague or don't even have a restoration process in place. No surprise there. In contrast, others like Arizona have very specific and clear public policies. Nice.

Regarding the topic of this thread, I didn't see any language allowing an owner to "re-stamp" a VIN before the initial inspection. The language always assumes that the VIN tags or stamps being inspected are original from the factory.
 

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The key works are with the intent to commit a crime. Without the intent to commit a crime, no crime has been committed. No prosecutor will prosecute, no judge or jury will convict. It's also a crime to remove a VIN with the intent to commit a crime. If you remove a VIN with no intention of committing a crime, you will do no jail time. If a buyer thinks a seller has misrepresented the value of a used car you can go to civil court.
 

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I would say it's rather hopeful that any official would know the law regarding this, even in their own jurisdiction. As for "discovery" of a re-stamped VIN, I'd guess that's unlikely in the extreme. There are perhaps a handful of experts who might even be capable of analyzing the font used in a VIN. I doubt I could spot a good re-stamp. The clerk at the DMV surely cannot. And the stories of law enforcement officials who are completely clueless as to the location and legitimacy of pre-68 underhood VINs are legion.
This guy would know...

 

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The key works are with the intent to commit a crime.
Intent is not as hard to proove as people think. This is a slippery slope that is best avoided.

A retired prosecutor explained to me that the effort used to recreate the original demonstrates intent to commit fraud. A prosecutor doesn't rely solely on what you say you were thinking at the time. They also rely on what actions you took.

So just choosing stamps that are a close match to Ford's fonts and using the same spacing as the original VIN stamp could land you in rather hot water. By definition, you're trying to forge the original without legal oversight and documentation.

The money involved at resale demonstrates motive. An artist who fakes a painting and sells it for $1M has obviously commited fraud. The same idea applies to forging a factory VIN on a classic car and then selling it at full collector-car market value. Adjusted for inflation and stripped away from all collector value as an antique, a used 66 coupe in good condition that might sell for $1.5K in 1973 would now be worth about $8.5K in 2019. Did you sell that car with forged VINs for double that? Uh oh.

Ironically, using an obviously different stamping set may avoid legal troubles. A State inspector may ask for an explanation, but if you answer honestly, then I suspect the worst thing that will happen in a State-issued VIN sticker, tag, etc. This documents and identifies the modified VIN and protects future buyers.

The question ALWAYS leads back to this: "Why not follow the law?" For me, the legal car holds more value. I would buy a well-documented, properly restored car with a State issued VIN over a car with a hinky VIN stamp/dash tag any day of the week. An honest restorer shows good character, which makes me suspect they may also do good work.
 

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I had an apprentice we called Nike. On account of what I had to yell at him all the time. He tried to overthink EVERYTHING, I swear.
 

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Did you read this entire thread or just a couple posts? There has been a tremendous amount of back and forth. The bottom line is different strokes for different states. No one here is condoning fraud on any level. Don’t be so judgmental of the board, it’s members, or it’s moderators.
 

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It is not legal to re-stamp a VIN unless overseen by law enforcement from my understanding.
From your understanding? Is that legal reference or are you just expressing your opinion as others have?



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Good job enabling fraud VMF members!
That seems way out of line. I am fairly certain the members posting are ethical with no intention of committing fraud.

This thread is in regards to a 1968 whose legal vin is located on the dash. I do not believe any sensible person would see reproducing the vehicles legal vin on the apron as fraudulent.

The beauty of the forum is, if you don’t like the topic or agree with what’s being said, don’t read it. Move on to a different thread. If you can’t be civil and allow others to disagree with your line of thinking, move on to another forum.

I truly respect a number of the posters in this thread. The lend their knowledge and experience without being condescending and ask for nothing in return.
 

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OK, so I had to go and look up Grindr and now this one appears to be escalating into a flame war too and is now locked down.
 

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Jabs may be taken in other threads. I trust that you will be on the lookout.
 
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