Vintage Mustang Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of this month's Ride of the Month Challenge!

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just bought an engine from a guy that says it runs good. I have on test stand and I would like to start it. Can you guys tell me if I'm thinking right and if I should be careful about anything.

1. The engine is secure on the stand - I even have some straps to make sure it does not move around.
2. I plan on hooking up the coil to the positive of a battery. Ground of battery to ground of engine. Then touching positive of the starter to battery. I only want to have the engine run for about 20 seconds - since I have no cooling for the engine.

Is this a good plan or not?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,200 Posts
If I were you I would plumb a radiator with a fan in front of it. I've never heard good things about running an engine dry. Told you can get super hot spots pretty quickly running dry even.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,228 Posts
I have test run half a dozen engines without the radiator hooked up and never had an issue....of course, I usually only start them for a few seconds in those circumstances so I dont have to drain coolant if I need to pull them...if you choose not to hook a radiator and fan up, limit your time to under 30 seconds and it will be fine. Most of the engines I have run like this though have been EFI so they start and run much faster than a carbed engine....its always been more of a wiring test than anything else for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37,688 Posts
I just bought an engine from a guy that says it runs good. I have on test stand and I would like to start it. Can you guys tell me if I'm thinking right and if I should be careful about anything.

1. The engine is secure on the stand - I even have some straps to make sure it does not move around.
2. I plan on hooking up the coil to the positive of a battery. Ground of battery to ground of engine. Then touching positive of the starter to battery. I only want to have the engine run for about 20 seconds - since I have no cooling for the engine.

Is this a good plan or not?
Sure, but I'd STILL use a starter solenoid to engage the starter just to avoid making a big spark near the battery (hydrogen gas). Would also make sure you have nothing to get caught anywhere and that the engine has no fan, pulley's, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,404 Posts
I've test run several engines on a stand. If I'm going to run it for a while (several minutes or more), I connect the lower radiator host to the pump then connect it to the upper radiator hose (from the thermostat housing). Then I remove the thermostat, install the housing and fill the hoses with water, making sure the heater outlets on the pump and block are plugged. Then just reconnect the hose to the thermostat housing and fire it up. Now you'll have circulating water while it's running.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,629 Posts
Shake it around well and make sure its secure. Dont count on any human power to keep the stand secure. Dont try and "save" anything by hand.
Crank it for a bit before either giving it gas or coil power to watch how it torques about.
Look out for what the exhaust might blow onto.
Have a quick and safe way to kill it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
502 Posts
If you are not going to connect a coolant source, I would remove the belts so that the water pump cannot rotate. I wouldn't run it any longer than I could hold my hand on the exhaust manifold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
839 Posts
I might do my own bench test when I rebuild my OE 289 that's outside of the car (302 is in). I was thinking about how to do this safely and effectively. But what can you really tell if you're running it for 30 sec aside from seeing if it will start? What I would be doing aside from a break-in period would be to see if there are any bearing knocks, noises or other showstoppers before I'd WASTE my time fully installing an engine and tranny only to find those things going down the road. You'll prob also want to definitely monitor the oil pressure via the pressure switch too. You can install a dial gauge on it temporarily.

Not hard to rig up a radiator and cooling loop. Just make sure to wear hearing protection unless you actually plan to hook up mufflers to the manifolds. It will be loud as hell, if there's a misfire and pop you might actually get severe hearing damage that will only partially reverse itself. Read about that once on this board!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
839 Posts
If you are not going to connect a coolant source, I would remove the belts so that the water pump cannot rotate. I wouldn't run it any longer than I could hold my hand on the exhaust manifold.
Which defeats the entire purpose of a bench test. That will be a very short run. It runs....so what?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,404 Posts
You can usually run your engine on a test stand for 5-10 minutes without the water pump engaged or having to worry about engine temps. That's enough to test oil pressure, idle speed/mix, knocks, etc. You can rev the engine a bit to check for piston slap/misfires. Been there, done that many times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
839 Posts
You can usually run your engine on a test stand for 5-10 minutes without the water pump engaged or having to worry about engine temps. That's enough to test oil pressure, idle speed/mix, knocks, etc. You can rev the engine a bit to check for piston slap/misfires. Been there, done that many times.
Sure that might be enough to tell you if your engine is a total dud from the start. But to really get a thorough reading on it, you must reach and hold the peak operating temperature. There's allot that can show only after that. Such as antifreeze breaching head gaskets, manifold leaks and issues, and drop off in oil pressure at higher temps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,404 Posts
Then I guess you'd be better off not pre-testing your engines without building a complete engine test station complete with a load test dynamo. Or pay to have a professional do your testing for you. Or, better yet, buy a new engine in the crate.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,096 Posts
Be sure engine turns freely by hand / wrench on the crank first to be sure there isn't a bolt or something sticking out a little somewhere, maybe prime the oil pump first...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
839 Posts
Then I guess you'd be better off not pre-testing your engines without building a complete engine test station complete with a load test dynamo. Or pay to have a professional do your testing for you. Or, better yet, buy a new engine in the crate.
Saw a pretty functional testing stand for running a motor from Walmart for $351.00 well reviewed. Just need to rig up a radiator n' go at it. But I'd bet a machine shop that builds engines would do that testing for the same or less :p I'd only do my own testing if I'd had machine work done and did the final assembly myself. Still haven't decided if I want go to that commando on my 1st real build on a matching numbers.

For this gent though, if he's already going to all the trouble....just pipe up a rad....not that hard to do.
 

·
Registered
64 1/2 D Code Coupe,
Joined
·
3,354 Posts
Make sure that the stand you start it on is made to handle a running engine. I wouldn't start an engine on stand that rotates.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,404 Posts
My test stand is a box made of 2x12s. The block rests on the pan bolts on each side with the end boards notched out to clear the balancer. Sorry, I don't have a picture handy.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top