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Discussion Starter #1
I just had my 69 Mustang have an issue starting. I go to start the car to return back to work after lunch and it keeps trying to start even after I pulled the keys out. It was running rough and you could tell something wasn't right. I had to jump out and run over to disconnect my battery, luckily I had a crescent near by.

I want to say it's the starter solenoid but it's a newer one I've had not even a year. I have the old one that I replaced when I changed the battery that is still good so I'll switch it out after I get home and see if it still acts the same.

The starter looks old (maybe original or older replacement). The thing is I rewired in a new ignition pigtail over the weekend. I was having trouble with the wires being loose and losing power to the dash (it would come back on when pressing in the wires on the back). I know I wired in the new one correctly as I took forever doing it double checking everything and doing one wire at a time. It was starting like normal without any trouble until this.

I have the petronix ignitor and coil that replaced the originals maybe 5k miles ago. If it makes a difference. Any help would be appreciated!
 

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I think you're on the right track in replacing the solenoid. New parts are sometimes junk and don't seem to last to long.

If it happens again rap on the solenoid with something hard, like a hammer.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I think you're on the right track in replacing the solenoid. New parts are sometimes junk and don't seem to last to long.

If it happens again rap on the solenoid with something hard, like a hammer.
Yeah, it didn't last long if that's the case! Good to know about the tapping on it if it does it again.
 

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i had nothing but trouble with stater solinoids in the last 20++ years. i put back on my 40 year old motorcraft that i took off like in 1992, only because it looked old.... and it works fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
i had nothing but trouble with stater solinoids in the last 20++ years. i put back on my 40 year old motorcraft that i took off like in 1992, only because it looked old.... and it works fine.
Haha! Function over beauty. I hope just switching out to the old one does the trick!
 

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Starter solenoid. First step is to buy a quality piece. Motorcraft (Ford dealer), Standard Motor Products (Many parts stores), Echlin (NAPA). Next step is to check voltage drop for high resistance in the starting circuit and correct any problems you might find. High resistance causes excessive heat and usually the first component to get damaged is the solenoid.

To check voltage drop, grab your multimeter, set to Volts, and put the black lead on the positive battery post and the red lead on the big post on the solenoid. You should have next to no reading. The condition of the connections between battery terminal end and post, battery cable and terminal end, battery cable and eyelet and eyelet and solenoid post will affect resistance and voltage drop. Cleaning and securing these connections will improve performance. Also affecting resistance is the size and condition of the cable conductor (usually copper in a quality cable) inside the insulation.

You can disconnect the starter cable from the big lug on the back of the solenoid, energize the solenoid by holding the key to "S" or jumpering the "S" terminal and then measuring the voltage drop across the solenoid while engaged. A good solenoid will have little to no voltage drop. Same goes with the starter cable and ground cables.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Starter solenoid. First step is to buy a quality piece. Motorcraft (Ford dealer), Standard Motor Products (Many parts stores), Echlin (NAPA). Next step is to check voltage drop for high resistance in the starting circuit and correct any problems you might find. High resistance causes excessive heat and usually the first component to get damaged is the solenoid.

To check voltage drop, grab your multimeter, set to Volts, and put the black lead on the positive battery post and the red lead on the big post on the solenoid. You should have next to no reading. The condition of the connections between battery terminal end and post, battery cable and terminal end, battery cable and eyelet and eyelet and solenoid post will affect resistance and voltage drop. Cleaning and securing these connections will improve performance. Also affecting resistance is the size and condition of the cable conductor (usually copper in a quality cable) inside the insulation.

You can disconnect the starter cable from the big lug on the back of the solenoid, energize the solenoid by holding the key to "S" or jumpering the "S" terminal and then measuring the voltage drop across the solenoid while engaged. A good solenoid will have little to no voltage drop. Same goes with the starter cable and ground cables.
I'll have to try that to see what's going on. I have a voltmeter and a spare solenoid to see what different readings I'll get comparing the two. All very good info, thanks for chiming in Bartl!
 

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Reconnect the battery cable and when it starts cranking (starter motor is running) disconnect (pull off) the small RED/BLU (red with blue stripe) wire that is attached to the 'S' terminal on the starter solenoid (see pic below). If the cranking stops the problem is your ignition switch or wiring. If it continues to crank the problem is the solenoid.



Paul
 

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As long as you have a meter, I suggest you remove the starter lead and check for stray voltage through the ground bracket on the solenoid. I had this same issue once where a lack of good ground elsewhere in the car was sending low voltage back into the solonoid causing it to engage. I was convinced it was the solonoid, and three solonoids later found the back feed issue... The recent rewire you did with the associated problems also make me think this could be the issue Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Reconnect the battery cable and when it starts cranking (starter motor is running) disconnect (pull off) the small RED/BLU (red with blue stripe) wire that is attached to the 'S' terminal on the starter solenoid (see pic below). If the cranking stops the problem is your ignition switch or wiring. If it continues to crank the problem is the solenoid.



Paul
I reconnected the battery when I got home and it didn't do anything. I tapped on the solenoid before starting and it started up like normal. I put on the other solenoid I have (the original one) and it started up multiple times fine. I also checked around with my voltmeter before that and nothing out of the normal.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
As long as you have a meter, I suggest you remove the starter lead and check for stray voltage through the ground bracket on the solenoid. I had this same issue once where a lack of good ground elsewhere in the car was sending low voltage back into the solonoid causing it to engage. I was convinced it was the solonoid, and three solonoids later found the back feed issue... The recent rewire you did with the associated problems also make me think this could be the issue Good luck!
Thanks! I'll give that a try too! I definitely know something is up if this solenoid I replaced it with seems to act up as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
https://youtu.be/e8Z_BPMtJBA

Ok, now I'm having an all new problem with the original starter solenoid on. I posted a video so you can kind of hear what's going on. I'm not sure why it's doing this. It's done it maybe three separate times after trying to restart after driving the car somewhere. Any ideas what is going on? What can I do to check it out? Thanks!
 
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