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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I decided to finally get around to rebuilding the steering box on my 66 coupe. The wear on the hard parts was light and pass according to stanger's site (thanks stanger). I noticed there is no seal on the snout of the worm bearing adjuster cap to the long input shaft. Maybe I forgot one or missed it? It appears the worm bearings alone keep the grease in the box?

I did press in the sector shaft seal no problem.

Greg
 

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No seal at all. That's why it is so easy for water to get inside the steering box and cause problems. If you look down the shaft, into the snout, you will actually see the ball bearings.

You can't really fabricate a seal to work in there either. On the long input shafts, the lower worm part is actually machined as a separate part and then welded to the rest of the shaft. You can see the bulge on the shaft from the weld and often see the blueing on the shaft from the heat. Also, the hole through the adjusting nut snout is often bored off center. Because of these things, the shaft doesn't usually center in the snout, so any seal would probably not work very well.

The bearing doesn't keep water out and it doesn't keep grease in. As you assemble the box, fill it really full with grease. When you work the box, the rack block will push the grease all over inside the box and some will squeeze out through the top bearing and into the snout. Leave this excess grease in place. It will help seal the bearings and box off from water and dust.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks. I was thinking of doing just what you mentioned fabricating a seal. I didn't see any rust in the original teardown, so water fortunately must not have gotten in for the PO. Everything went together real smooth, but, man, getting those ball bearings to circulate properly without falling out was a real exercise in patience!

Great web site, BTW.

Greg
 
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