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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I will be starting medical school in the fall and have no resources or time to put into my one owner 1969 mustang convertible. I'm looking to store the car for probably 8-10 years, 5 years at a minimum and am wondering what steps you all think should be taken. This car has significant rear quarter rust which is something I want to control before putting it into a storage unit or garage. I was thinking that maybe I could strip the paint and cut out all rusted areas before throwing some primer on the body in an effort to preserve the car. Any thoughts? Also what other steps should be taken? I'm just looking to preserve this car until I am done with school and financially able to fix it up.

Any thoughts would be appreciated?

Thanks,

Justin
 

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Not in order:

The best thing you can do for the rust is store it in a dry environment.

Change all the oils and fluids.

Drain and purge the fuel system.

Fog the engine with light top lube.

If you will have access to the car, pressurize the tires, and turn the engine a few seconds several times a year. If you will not, remove the wheels, and support the car under the axle and lower control arms.

Remove the battery.

Any metal you are worried about could be sprayed with Cosmoline. Military stuff from WWII turns up all the time, like new, because of that stuff.
 

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Hello,

This car has significant rear quarter rust which is something I want to control before putting it into a storage unit or garage. I was thinking that maybe I could strip the paint and cut out all rusted areas before throwing some primer on the body
I just have one thought. If their is "significant" rust, it sounds like somethting that would new metal patchwork, whether now or 10 years from now. I agree with all of what 22GT recommends and for the record, primer is a much different product than paint and designed for a different purpose. It is actually "porous" enough that moisture can penetrate it over time. If you don't do Cosmoline, you might consider this (10 year guarantee!)

Automotive Formula - Rust Bullet LLC
 

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For that length of time I'd recommend the steps below with the exception of draining the coolant. Don't want a heater core to corrode and leak fluid, or general corrosion in the innards of the system elsewhere. 5-8 years is a long time to sit...

If you do have access and can fire it up once a year or more then just note to swap it out every 2 years (max, 1 would be better) to keep corrosion protection active.

Even if its on jackstands turning it over and idling until the thermostat opens would not hurt (a few seconds will not circulate coolant). Idling longer will ensure oil pressure/temps get up to operating condition and is held, which can improve seal life. A trip around the block is good too, if you can swing it.

If you leave gas in it, use Stabil (I stored a car for 18 months with one tank of gas using it and it ran fine after that). But draining is better, which makes occasional startup a bit more of a chore.

Rodent protection, depending on where you live, is also a good idea. 10 years of mouse/rat nesting can leave a mess.

A "car bag" is an option to consider if its going to be untouched for years...

On the rusted areas depending on where and how bad wire wheeling, scraping or limited blasting to remove active rust and some rust converter and a spray of rattle can rustoleum or other similar product would be a low cost option to prevent further damage.

Cosmolene is good stuff, but messy and can be a PITA to remove. As it is a rust preventative, not sure if its recommended to go on over active rust or if it will stop active corrosion. But can't hurt. Either way, you definately want to try to stop it as much as you can... as Neil Young said (he stole it from Rustoleum who got the line from Mark Mothersbaugh, one of the guys who eventually formed Devo) "Rust Never Sleeps".
:)
 

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All I would do with the rust is spray phosphoric acid all over it inside and out. This stuff eats concrete so do it outside. It will form a protective coating to stop it from rusting any more.
 

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If you can reach the rusted areas, POR 15 the rust to encapsulate it. Everything else is good to go.
 

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I would not worry much about the rust.

If you have to replace 3 or 4" it is the same amount of work. If you have a good storage environment the rust will not really progress.

From a storage standpoint, what temp will the body see. I live in NJ and you get days where an improperly vented building can get condensing moisture. The car is cold and the heat and humidity come in and condense on the cold car. This can be worse if it is in a storage area where a door is opened frequently. You also have areas where moisture from the ground just eats everything.
It does not matter what you do to protect the body from more rust, it is just going to get more rust if you have the wrong storage.

Remove the gas and I would even consider draining the brake system and blowing out with air. The temp changes during the day cause the brake fluid to seep through the seal and then get sucked back in along with moisture. A couple of years later and everything will need to be replaced in the brake system.

Unless you have only none alcohol gas do not allow the gas to stay in any part of the system. Drain the tank and get it out of the lines. The fuel bowl is vented and the gas will evaporate out. The alcohol gas is just nasty and goes bad quickly without any stabilizer.

Pull the battery and expect the tires to go bad in 10 years.

Since I would assume a full quality restoration is planned in 20 years or so, when do you plan on paying off your student loans?

Best of luck on med school.
 

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Do yourself a favor and spend your time squiring away tough to find parts. You'll love yourself 8 years from now, they'll be expensive and really hard to find.

There is controversy as to starting the motor occasionally. The problem being if you don't have a smog pump or don't drive it enough to evaucate the block, condensation can be an issue. I read a lot, I havn't had the problem myself.

I probably wouldn't start it if it was mine mainly because I wouldn't want fuel in the system. I would definitely turn it over occasionally. I've taken apart garage find old motorcycles and found bearings that exchange electrons and pit surfaces. Rings leave marks on cylinders. Pretty extreme for only 8 years but since you asked...

One friend just "fogged" till the engine died before he deployed, then removed all the fuel. This is important, fuel turns to varnish and is a "female canine animal" to clean out of a fuel system. Its worth the time to drain the tank, blow out the fuel lines and turn the carb upside down and shake it... If it was mine I'd pull the bowls (assuming Holley) and accelerator pump cover to make sure.

M
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Yeah...money is an issue. I figure I can dump a few thousand a year into the car through residency...or maybe take out another loan. $10-50,000.00 isn't going to seem like much next to $300,000.00. The car will be stored in Idaho so the weather is variable....I'm thinking that I might want to shell out on a heated storage unit. If my grandfather hadn't bought the car I would be tempted to sell...but that isn't going to happen so I've got my summer work cut out trying to keep my car alive.
 

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I would drain fuel tank or run it out, run till it is almost out of gas , Spray WD-40 into the carb till she dies. Pull spark plugs- spray wd40 in cylinders (waste the whole can) Reinstall plugs. Drain antifreeze. Now the motor should be protected. Remove battery- get it away from the car. Spray motor oil on rusty areas- this will inhibit rust and is easy to wash off later. Place bounty dryer sheets around the interior and trunk to keep mice away. Don't bother with jackstands- your tires will be pretty shot after 10yrs of storage so why worry about flatspots/weather checking etc. You could place a cap over the exhaust- but if you WD the cylinders you shouldn't need to. Chromed and painted areas- wax but don't wipe it off Store title, keys and papers somewhere else. Cost- 1 can of WD, 1 box dryer sheets, 1 can of paste wax. (I agree with other posters re: running the car, but I bet you will be so busy this won't happen) Bad gas can occur in 1 semester, mice in 1 night, batterys can explode/drip acid anytime.
 
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