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I currently have my 67 fastback up on jackstands in my shop and am trying to
take stock of all the parts I will need to order as well as the repairs that I must do.
I am unsure if the front end is straight on my car because the previous owner had bought it a long time ago to use as parts.
So... Does anyone have any advice or methods to measure the front frame rails to ensure that they are straight?

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll271/srushpics/IMG_1812.jpg
 

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The shop manual for the car will have diagrams with all of the critical dimensional measurements. I think that if the frame rails are not straight, then these measurements won't jive.

If you're going to the trouble of restoring one of these beasts, I'd recommend buying a shop manual. It's the one Mustang book I've used the most.

Here's an example of where to get a shop manual: http://www.amazon.com/Cougar-Fairlane-Falcon-Mercury-Mustang/dp/096732114X

You can also get them in print but printed copies are more expensive.
 

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According to a frame shop I consulted years ago on this topic, to test the squareness of the front frame rails/radiator support relative to the cowl and to one another, measure in an "X" pattern. Find a location on the cowl - outside edge on one side of the car, then measure the length of a straight, diagonal line to a spot on the outside corner of the radiator support. Write down this number. Find the identical spots, but on the other side of the car, and measure a straight diagonal line between those two points. Write down the number. The numbers should be identical if the engine compartment/frame rails/radiator support is perfectly square. If the numbers are different, then measure the same spots, but this time from the cowl straight forward to the spot on the radiator support on the same side of the car. The longer of the two measurements will indicate which frame rail is straightest.

Another measurement would be to park the car in the garage, over some newspaper or butcher paper or equivalent. mark a pencil line where the front and rear tires contact the surface. Then drop a plump line down from the inside rear portion of the front frame rail; mark that point. Next, drop the plump line from the inside front of the same frame rail; mark the spot where the plump bob contacts the surface.

Back the car off the paper. Use a long straight edge to draw an extended straight line using the reference marks made by the tires. This reference line should be long enough that you can measure the distance between the frame rail marks and the reference line. The two distances should be identical. If not, the frame rail is bent.

Hope this help.
 
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