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Discussion Starter #1
Of all the areas of prepping and painting a car, what percentage of time is the stripping?

Assumptions:

1. No rust repair
2. Minor body work only

Thanks!
 

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I'd consider stripping a completely separate step from any body repair or other prep. I had my '68 media blasted - the shop had it about three weeks and apparently did the work in about eight hours total.

I can't recommend the process highly enough if you're working with an older car that might have a couple of paint jobs and any amount of unknown ding and rust repair. Gives you a completely clean "bare slate" to build up to a new paint job on.

I'm not quite sure that answers your question, but body and prep can take anywhere from 10-99 percent of the time for repainting. It depends on how deep you want to go, how fussy you are about how the repairs are made, how small a flaw has to be before you let it go, etc.

Don't skimp on the strip, body and prep, though. A paint job really is in everything that leads up to actually spraying the color.
 

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I used a Mikata sander/polisher and 80 grit sand paper to remove the bulk of the paint (multiple paint jobs) and used stripper and wire wheels to remove the rest. Took most of a weekend. I gouged the metal in a couple of places due to lack of experience - be careful.
Hint if you do this IN the garage it will take about a week to clean up the dust!!!
 

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I probably spent about 35 hours stripping using a chemical stipper to start and then a D/A sander with various grits to finish the job. The D/A was much quicker, but I am sure I took some metal with the paint. And, the neighboors didn't like the D/A too much, but better than the die grinder:) As far as percentage, i don't know because I had a shop do the body work (minor patches for a few rust spots on the quarters and doors) as well as paint.

It took me that long because there was a VERY thick coat of primer (possibly a sandable/filler primer)over the factory paint job and underneath the paint job that was visable.

If you go the chemical route, be prepared to go all the way. It will eat up all existing bondo if there is any, so you'll likely have to sand all of that away (at least that is what I did).

If you can afford the plastic media blast...go that way.
 

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This is from a hotrod.com article that has good things to say about using the baking soda blasting/stripping process. Also, this is what the Unique Performance guys do that build the GT500E Eleanor cars.
RS
Drezek Environmental Stripping Systems (DESS), where our ’39 has received a new Bitchin Products firewall, dash and floor, specializes in the clean and safe removal of old paint. DESS utilizes a high-pressure blasting method to strip cars and trucks to bare metal, but the blasting medium is either baking soda or a combination of baking soda and slightly more aggressive media for heavy-duty cleanups such as deep rust pockets. Baking-soda blasting strips only paint from the car, leaving all rubber, glass and chrome unaffected. Body filler is also unaffected by the process, so previously repaired areas may be evaluated after stripping and either left intact or reworked. If desired, DESS can also strip the filler.

Baking soda also offers poststripping benefits. Paint components can be separated from the medium and, because it is biodegradable, the residual baking-soda medium can simply be washed away without fear of harm to the environment. In addition, baking soda acts as a rust inhibitor, so the vehicle can sit coated in the blasting medium for a reasonable period of time after stripping without the formation of new surface rust. DESS stripped the ’39 to bare metal in only a few hours. The same results, if done by hand with abrasives, would take days and require extremely meticulous detail work around body creases and seams. At the end of its stay in the blasting booth, the car was ready for primer, any needed repairs and the custom sheetmetal touches we had planned.
 
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