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I’m going to get them welded on but have a bolt-on kit I’m installing right now. The rear is supposed to attach via a threaded hole on the rear subframe. Due to being 50 years old I assume, the holes don’t align between the connector and subframe. The subframe hole is shifted about 1/2” towards the front and outside of the car from where it should be.

Any advice on how others dealt with it? I dont think drilling a new hole will work as there will be overlap with existing hole in the frame. I tried lifting and lowering the front of the car but it’s not making much of a difference.

Thanks in advance! As always, y’all are the best!
 

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Don't waste your time.
Bolt-on kits are WORTHLESS. By the time you get enough bolts involved, you might as well have welded it on.

ex-Global West GM
1991-1995
 

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Which subframe connector are you attempting to install? I recently installed Hotchkis SFC's in my '66 using a single bolt to position them in place until the welding shop could properly weld them in. There were no pre-drilled holes in the factory subframes to align to. If you add more information about your car, year, SFC manufacturer, etc., you might get a greater number of responses.
760104
 

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Also not answering your question, but listen to @GT289
I was looking for subframe connectors and did a lot of research. The outcome was to get a weld in version. If you don’t have a welder find a muffler shop with a drive on lift. Some of the muffler guys are really good in welding and much cheaper compared to a body shop. I prepared everything at home and it is done in no time for a couple of tens of dollars.


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Also not answering your question, but listen to @GT289
I was looking for subframe connectors and did a lot of research. The outcome was to get a weld in version. If you don’t have a welder find a muffler shop with a drive on lift. Some of the muffler guys are really good in welding and much cheaper compared to a body shop. I prepared everything at home and it is done in no time for a couple of tens of dollars.
I need to find these folks! I took my 65 to a local shop that specializes in classic vehicles, and they wanted $300 to weld in a pair of Tinman SFCs. I kindly turned down their generous offer.
 

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OP, first thing to understand is that often times new parts dont always fit right to begin with, even OEM parts sometimes dont fit right. this is due to several reasons here;

these cars were rolling off the assembly lines at a fairly high rate of speed, so they werent put together exactly straight.

often times even OEM oparts were made on dies that were very close to the ends of their life, and again were not exactly accurate, but within(barely) tolerance

you also have to deal with tolerance stack where every measurement is off in the same direction

with aftermarket parts, often times they designed on one car per year, so what works for the early 66 mustang, may not work as well for a late 66 mustang for the reasons above.

and dont forget that ford often times made running changes, and that included moving bolt holes around, or realizing that they dont need said bolt holes so they eliminated them.

zso basically you get the fun of making your parts fit like you want them to fit.

now since you are going to weld these in anyway, you may as well fit them as you like, and install a few bolts to hold them in place while you get the car to whomever is going to do the welding for you.
 

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I’m going to get them welded on but have a bolt-on kit I’m installing right now. The rear is supposed to attach via a threaded hole on the rear subframe. Due to being 50 years old I assume, the holes don’t align between the connector and subframe. The subframe hole is shifted about 1/2” towards the front and outside of the car from where it should be.

Any advice on how others dealt with it? I dont think drilling a new hole will work as there will be overlap with existing hole in the frame. I tried lifting and lowering the front of the car but it’s not making much of a difference.

Thanks in advance! As always, y’all are the best!
What connectors and what year car are you working on?

As others have noted, manufacturing tolerance, vehicle age, accidents and tolerances from the SFC manufacturer are probably all stacking together against you. Since you are planning on welding them on, modify them as needed to make you happy and get them secure for the welder.
 

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I’m going to get them welded on but have a bolt-on kit I’m installing right now. The rear is supposed to attach via a threaded hole on the rear subframe. Due to being 50 years old I assume, the holes don’t align between the connector and subframe. The subframe hole is shifted about 1/2” towards the front and outside of the car from where it should be.

Any advice on how others dealt with it? I dont think drilling a new hole will work as there will be overlap with existing hole in the frame. I tried lifting and lowering the front of the car but it’s not making much of a difference.

Thanks in advance! As always, y’all are the best!
Get the “frame” dimensions verified before you weld anything on the vehicle. It may have received sustained some collision damage, everything should be straight and level before permanently welding the subframe connectors.
 

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I prepped my metal for Global West connectors and pounded as needed to get them to hold in place. I am somewhat rural Texas that has "Moe's Welding" two miles from the house. He dropped by (I do have a four post lift) and an hour and $65 later the work was done. Amazing difference.
 
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