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Short story made long.... Hired a former co-worker last May to help run sprayers and fertilizer equipment at the plant, who happens to be an exceptional employee, and is a certified welding whiz. He succeeded in talking us into purchasing a Lincoln SP 1200 wirefeed welder, which I WILL learn to use. The arc welder buzz box we have is good for chicken#@$( welds. So we have all kinds of plant welding projects lined up for him when business grinds to a halt in a couple weeks......including my subframe connectors.

I will be out of town the next couple of weekends, but will pull the mustang into the shop and we will then fabricate and install the subframe connectors. I will feel much better about the integrity of the unibody since I had to install floor pans on boths sides. Plan drawings are already prepped and it is just a matter of a couple evening sessions to get them built, then installed. I want to complete that project before installing the heavier front suspension/steering and brake componenents. I'll keep you posted on subframe project.
 

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I just last Sunday installed the TCP subframe connectors that I got thru the VMF group buy......They look good, and installed very easily. I should have done it a month ago.....
Have only had a chance to drive the car around the block, but, I could tell a big difference in how it feels....
Will give a good try this weekend. Driving to Myrtle Beach, SC for Mustang Week....
 

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When I started drag racing my coupe in the early 80's, I had welded in connectors. Also at that time I removed the front sway bar, for better wight transfer. You know the car handled better with the frame connectors, and no bar, then it did with the bar, and no connectors. I cant wait till its done, and I have both.
 

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Dan - I also have plans to do a set of SFCs on my car, but I am waiting.

The reason for waiting is that I want the car completely assembled, with the suspension fully settled before I do it. My theory is that without the chassis completely "broken in", I could be doing more harm than good.

I'm not sure if this theory holds water, but it seems right to me.

BTW- Don't forget that the connectors need to be installed with the full weight of the car on its wheels.
 

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How do you install the SFC with the full weight of the car on the wheels? Dont you have to remove the rear spring bolt? I have my car fully supported in all four corners with no suspension on it. The SFC I have require at a minimum that you remove the front rear spring bolt.

Also, could you please explain that the suspension needs to be broken in B 4 you install the SFC. If the frame rails are straight and everything lines up, would it not be smart to connect the two frames at this point? I think it would keep the body from flexing when the suspension is installed.

Now that my floor pans are painted and sealed my SFC are going in next. Then my suspension will follow. I guess there is always more than one way to skin a cat.
 

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I agree with MrGem (as much as I hate to!). I'd wait until the suspension and engine are installed, and the suspension has time to settle in a bit. Once that SFC is welded in, it's kinda hard to adjust; you know what I mean? Nudge Nudge.
 

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You can install them by leaving the front tires on the ground and then rasing the rear from your axle with a jack until the cars and axle both lift and the suspension is compressed. At least this is what Competition Engineering says.
 

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I still do not see/understand this. As I see it you are taking one frame and connecting it to a second frame. These two frames are already connected via the floors, roof, and rocker boxes. If the car is supported in all the correct lifting points, why would the full weight of the car on the supsension matter?

I thought the point of subframe connectors was to strengthen the ridigity of the body and frame, to keep it from flexing. If that is the point, wouldn't the body in a fixed position be desireable?

It just seems to me that if you are creating a full frame car( by attaching the subframes together ) It would be better to have the body in a fixed position.

If any one has manufacturers data on this I would love to see it.

Thomas
 

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If you have the rear of the car lifted and the front of the car is compressed, is'nt that putting more stress on the front subframe?

It seems that more stress on the front subframe would also increase the stress on the well known weak/flexable body. If there is more flex on the body when you attach subframes once you put the car back on the ground the stress/flex is now welded into the body by the subframes. Wouldn't welding them in under full suspension lock in any flex that your car would be experiencing already?

Right now I just don't see that having the car up in the air supported in its lifting locations is a problem. If the subframes are straight and true it will remain correct when welded in irregardless of the suspension.

I thought the idea was to lock the car in as close to factory as possible and keep the flex out.

I just dont see it.
 
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