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Discussion Starter #1
I want to run a trans cooler however space is tight with my 68 and having A/C stacked in front of the radiator reduces options. I was checking out some mustang pics and a light bulb may have went off. I noticed the factory 67/68 GT350 lower valance has a larger cut-out and retains the bumper/lights. I wonder if that valance will open some room for a stack plate cooler? Any one have one installed?

I figured if it will work the change would be subtle but purposeful...

thoughts?
 

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Hmmm…

The car already has a trans cooler.

The 67 Shelby valence and 68 Shelby valence are completely different. And yes, both have a larger intake opening. What you'd need, though, is a 67-68 Mustang valence with a 65 "R Model" style opening, where the license plate is now.



Improving overall cooling will get you what you want.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hmmm…

The car already has a trans cooler.

The 67 Shelby valence and 68 Shelby valence are completely different. And yes, both have a larger intake opening. What you'd need, though, is a 67-68 Mustang valence with a 65 "R Model" style opening, where the license plate is now.



Improving overall cooling will get you what you want.
thank you! the R model style is what I was looking at. Yes it should allow more air to flow esp lower on the radiator by the built in trans cooler. I have a hughes finned +1 qrt pan on it now and just from in-town drives in 105 degree weather the temp is normally 150-165 max so far with my IR gun. I haven't ran it on the highway yet and that is my concern. I moving to ohio and the route to work is highway vs side streets in Tucson. I will check it with my IR gun but just looking for options if needed.
 

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That cut out was used on the GT350 for engine oil cooler. It would most likely work for a trans cooler as well.
 

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Just some guy
67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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Curious. The optimum operating temperature of the transmission fluid is between 175-225 F. So if you are seeing 165 "max" you're already overcooling it. Depends on what exactly you are pointing your IR gun at though. Ideal engine coolant temperature for maximum performance and efficiency is about 200 F (at the engine, not the radiator) and rule of thumb engine oil temperatures should run between 20-40 degrees higher than the coolant.
Just sayin.
 
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Curious. The optimum operating temperature of the transmission fluid is between 175-225 F. So if you are seeing 165 "max" you're already overcooling it. Depends on what exactly you are pointing your IR gun at though. Ideal engine coolant temperature for maximum performance and efficiency is about 200 F (at the engine, not the radiator) and rule of thumb engine oil temperatures should run between 20-40 degrees higher than the coolant.
Just sayin.
Yes, but trans coolers look....cool. :laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Curious. The optimum operating temperature of the transmission fluid is between 175-225 F. So if you are seeing 165 "max" you're already overcooling it. Depends on what exactly you are pointing your IR gun at though. Ideal engine coolant temperature for maximum performance and efficiency is about 200 F (at the engine, not the radiator) and rule of thumb engine oil temperatures should run between 20-40 degrees higher than the coolant.
Just sayin.
as stated earlier, those temps are just from cruising around town. It hasn't been on the highway yet. I am fine with it running at 175-180 but I don't want it to go over that.

I take the temps at the middle of the trans fluid pan (toward the front) right after i pull into my garage.
 

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as stated earlier, those temps are just from cruising around town. It hasn't been on the highway yet. I am fine with it running at 175-180 but I don't want it to go over that.
OK, do an hour on the highway check it again. The trans cooler is in the lower tank of the radiator, where it should be seeing temps of 170°F.

What makes you think it will run hot, you towing a mobile home?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
OK, do an hour on the highway check it again. The trans cooler is in the lower tank of the radiator, where it should be seeing temps of 170°F.

What makes you think it will run hot, you towing a mobile home?
i don't know yet that it will run hot, just options at this point. A good family friend growing up has owned a tranny shop in ca area for the last 40 yrs and he always used to say, "tow vehicles and hot rods should run an additional trans cooler" obviously the goal of keeping the temp down is to extend service life of the trans.

" The trans cooler is in the lower tank of the radiator" yes sir! had to hook up the lines twice now, once for the new radiator install and once when I installed my rebuilt C4.

the cooler would be installed in series with the trans cooler in the radiator.
 

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Stick the tranny cooler behind the stock valance. a) it'll be in a low-pressure area and get moderate airflow around the fins and, b) it'll be protected from flying debris.
 

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Just some guy
67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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If it were running at 200F I would consider it ideal, Not sure where you're getting your suggested temperatures from. Transmissions aren't supposed to run cold. Some of the latest automatics now have internal heaters to speed getting the ATF up to operating temperature. (Dodge trucks, for example.) There exist thermostatic bypasses (factory on many late model Fords) which would let you run as big a cooler as you liked and never overcool. Simple.
IR guns are nice diagnostic tools but not a real substitutes for gauges. You can buy a transmission temperature gauge if you're interested in REALLY keeping an eye on things.
I happen to think oil coolers in Shelby type valances DO look cool. And since I do stuff to my cars sometimes solely for coolness, who am I to tell somebody else what visually pleases them. Use a bypass and it's certainly all good mechanically.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
If it were running at 200F I would consider it ideal, Not sure where you're getting your suggested temperatures from. Transmissions aren't supposed to run cold. Some of the latest automatics now have internal heaters to speed getting the ATF up to operating temperature. (Dodge trucks, for example.) There exist thermostatic bypasses (factory on many late model Fords) which would let you run as big a cooler as you liked and never overcool. Simple.
IR guns are nice diagnostic tools but not a real substitutes for gauges. You can buy a transmission temperature gauge if you're interested in REALLY keeping an eye on things.
I happen to think oil coolers in Shelby type valances DO look cool. And since I do stuff to my cars sometimes solely for coolness, who am I to tell somebody else what visually pleases them. Use a bypass and it's certainly all good mechanically.
maybe i need a re-baseline on my education. I was under the understanding that C4 trans temps for normal operation were supposed to be 170-185 and that anything higher would start reducing longevity.

i typically do mods for purpose but i do like the look of the lower R lower valance...just brings a little bit of mean look, like actually having some meats on the rear.

i did find a thermal bypass that wouldn't route fluid through the cooler until the temp reached a predetermined temp.
 

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Just some guy
67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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Call it a thermal bypass if you like, it's all good and an excellent modification to make. It tickles me that I spent mor eon the bypass on my motorcylce than I did the oil cooler. Stock Ford bypasses are easy to come by in salvage yards though. Pretty sure I have one from a Taurus stashed somewhere I've been meaning to put on my F150 as it sees a lot of short trips. (Thanks for reminding me of that little project.)
One thing I personally don't like about running a transmission too cold is that it tends not to boil the moisture out of the transmission, especially with lots of short trips. And you WILL have moisture from the condensation resulting form heating and cooling cycles. You can have the same issues with engines but that's another story. One obvious problem resulting from this is that the steel separator plate in the valve body rusts. That rust will pit and even eat away at that plate, to start with. Lots of folks here have dabbled in C4 rebuilding or installing shift kits. Everybody who has seen this pitting raise your hand. So to speak. :)
See my signature? I'm just some guy, you don't have to listen to me. We're on the internet. Google "ideal automatic transmission operating temperature" or something.
 

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See my signature? I'm just some guy, you don't have to listen to me. We're on the internet. Google "ideal automatic transmission operating temperature" or something.
I've been on this forum a long time. I would take GypsyR's advice over the results of a Google search almost every time. And if they happened to agree, it would be a no-brainer.

Just my studied observation...

MrFreeze
 

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One thing I personally don't like about running a transmission too cold is that it tends not to boil the moisture out of the transmission, especially with lots of short trips. And you WILL have moisture from the condensation resulting form heating and cooling cycles. You can have the same issues with engines but that's another story. One obvious problem resulting from this is that the steel separator plate in the valve body rusts. That rust will pit and even eat away at that plate, to start with. Lots of folks here have dabbled in C4 rebuilding or installing shift kits. Everybody who has seen this pitting raise your hand.
And you need to get the fluid to 170-180 to get the moisture out. Moisture does not just cause rust in steels and bearings, it also dissolves the glue in the clutches. ie: my 7.3 superduty has a 24"x24" 6.0 plate cooler for towing, but running empty the fluid will only hit 120, so I had to add a 180 thermostat.
 

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Your main worry seems to be where to locate the cooler for its size. I will add i don't think the trans cooler needs to be very large.
On my Silverado with HD towing package the cooler is only about 6"X10", it only covers a small portion of the AC and rad cores.
You could "hide" it almost anywhere and use a small fan if needed. I have to imagine that going through a cooler with little airflow has to be at least as good as cooling with the hot radiator.:shrug:
 

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If it were running at 200F I would consider it ideal, Not sure where you're getting your suggested temperatures from. Transmissions aren't supposed to run cold. Some of the latest automatics now have internal heaters to speed getting the ATF up to operating temperature. (Dodge trucks, for example.)
Which is why the cooler is in the lower tank, not external. In cold weather, the system is a trans heater.
 

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The heck you say!
:)
 
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