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Hello, can anyone give me advice on what suspension to go with in my 66gt? Looking for something not too agressive and doesn’t break the bank but something that will significantly change the boat ride quality in the stang. Thank!
 

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Replace any worn components with MOOG brand. Replace worn out springs with Eaton-Detroit Spring using the "GT" spec coils and leafs. Invest in good shocks.. Koni Red or Bilstein.
 

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"Invest in good shocks" is very sound advice and makes a bigger difference in the end result than one would imagine.
 

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This is probably one of the most common posts on the VFM with tons of info. There was just the same question asked. Anyway outside of replacing worn out parts, the single most important thing you can do is lowering the upper control arm one inch and back one eight inch. This is called the Arning drop. It costs nothing more then the cost of a 17/32" drill bit. Followed up by a good alignment with at least 2° positive caster and 1/2° negative camber. Go for more caster if you can still keep that 1/2° negative camber.

Install a 1" front sway bar. Do what you can to stiffen up the unibody. 2 popular and easy items to install are the Monte Carlo bar between both shock towers and the export brace. The export brace is a 1 piece brace that replaces the 2 struts from the shock towers to firewall. The export brace was used on Mustangs going to Europe. Shocks, use the best shock you can buy. Konis are a tried and true shock that just work. Another popular shock is Bilsteins from Street or Track and Opentracker Racing.They have them custom valved to their specs and they work great.

Depending on your budget, 2 other items I would suggest. Replace the stock struts on the lower arm with adjustable struts that incorporate rod ends instead of the stock rubber bushings. These stabilize the lower control arms keeping them in place instead of moving all around and effecting suspension performance. They make a vast improvement in braking. I also like replacing the stock spring perches with ones that use roller bearings. These will far outlast stock ones and improve ride quality. The adjustable struts and be purchased from Street or Track and Opentracker Racing.

Both Street or Track and Opentracker Racing are regulars on this forum and both have excellent reputations for quality parts and customer service.
 

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For my latest 67, when I got it, it swayed like a boat in rough seas when it cornered. The first thing I did was replace the shocks with Bilsteins. Massive improvement. Its easy, and cheaper than replacing control arms and springs. Do that first and see how it feels.
 

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Not to gloriously self-promote, but I just posted a detailed write up on my complete suspension overhaul, and it works like a charm! Just FYI, the part numbers I post will be different between my ‘68 and your car, but there are versions of every part on my list available for your car. Hope you find it helpful.

 

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This is probably one of the most common posts on the VFM with tons of info. There was just the same question asked. Anyway outside of replacing worn out parts, the single most important thing you can do is lowering the upper control arm one inch and back one eight inch. This is called the Arning drop. It costs nothing more then the cost of a 17/32" drill bit. Followed up by a good alignment with at least 2° positive caster and 1/2° negative camber. Go for more caster if you can still keep that 1/2° negative camber.

Install a 1" front sway bar. Do what you can to stiffen up the unibody. 2 popular and easy items to install are the Monte Carlo bar between both shock towers and the export brace. The export brace is a 1 piece brace that replaces the 2 struts from the shock towers to firewall. The export brace was used on Mustangs going to Europe. Shocks, use the best shock you can buy. Konis are a tried and true shock that just work. Another popular shock is Bilsteins from Street or Track and Opentracker Racing.They have them custom valved to their specs and they work great.

Depending on your budget, 2 other items I would suggest. Replace the stock struts on the lower arm with adjustable struts that incorporate rod ends instead of the stock rubber bushings. These stabilize the lower control arms keeping them in place instead of moving all around and effecting suspension performance. They make a vast improvement in braking. I also like replacing the stock spring perches with ones that use roller bearings. These will far outlast stock ones and improve ride quality. The adjustable struts and be purchased from Street or Track and Opentracker Racing.

Both Street or Track and Opentracker Racing are regulars on this forum and both have excellent reputations for quality parts and customer service.
how does the Arning drop differ from the Shelby drop? what about ride?
 

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how does the Arning drop differ from the Shelby drop? what about ride?
They are the same thing, it's my understanding that Shelby used the Arning drop, shouldn't change ride in any noticeable amount.
 

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Pretty much what everyone stated above, below is what I did with ballpark estimates of pricing of parts only, you doing the monkey work, stock style with improvements. You will spend about about a grand to do this with the KYB shocks. As stated above also, but it will add considerablly to the cost, adjstable strut rods, roller spring saddels, and stiffer/more expensive coil springs. I am very very very happy with the set up below and how it changed the car. Oh yea....one last thing I forgot below, throw in a front end alignment by a shop who knows what the heck they are doing and you in just a bit over a grand. Good luck!

1. Export Brace $50
2. Monte Carlo Bar $50
3. 1" Sway Bar $150
4. Shocks
Minimum: KYB Gas Adjust
Max: Bilstien
5. Eaton Rear Leaf Springs Improved Handling $200
6. Scott Drake GT Coil Springs $100
My understanding, SD GT coil springs are just a little stiffer than Eaton springs, do NOT
get progressive springs.
7. Lower Control Arm Assembly $50
Simple remove and replace
8. Upper Control Arm Assembly $100
Simplet remove and replace
9. Coil Spring Saddle $50
I did not go roller due to cost, but went with a Scott Drake roller style is the best way to put it.
10. Moog Strut Rod Bushing Replacement $30
11. Shelby Drop: Free
This modification improves camber, which is improvement to tire contact with the pavement as the suspension moves up or down. It will lower the car a bit in the front, but nothing noticeable, less than an inch if I recall
 

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I'd like to suggest polyurethane bushings for longevity and less deflection which translates to spending the money once, and the metal components do their job instead of rubber flexing and giving, eventually dry rotting and tearing. My poly stuff was installed in 1993, still keeps my car level at rest, planted in the corners, and it looks new.
 

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Hello, can anyone give me advice on what suspension to go with in my 66gt? Looking for something not too agressive and doesn’t break the bank but something that will significantly change the boat ride quality in the stang. Thank!
Since you already have a GT go with Eaton Improved Handling (GT) leaf springs in the back and Eaton GT springs in the front. That'll give you your original ride height and characteristics. Then if your steering is loose and you need new tie rod ends go with Moog tie rods and then replace the upper and lower control arms with Moog control arms. While you're at it perform the Shelby drop. Put in a 1" sway bar, some of the sway bar kits come with the stabilizer links but I recommend replacing that while you have everything apart, add an export brace and a Monte Carlo bar. Swap out your shocks with KYG Gas-adjust or Koni or Bilstein if you have the bucks. You'll be happy you did.
 

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I can heartily recommend the package that Street or Track has (with Shelby/Arning drop), in addition to the Monte Carlo bar, export brace, and Z-ray's crossmember.
 

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how does the Arning drop differ from the Shelby drop? what about ride?
They are one-in-the-same. It was Ford's engineer, Klaus Arning, that developed the repositioning of the upper control arm mounting point in order to change the front suspension camber curve. Shelby simply adopted it and, of course since Shelby's name is much more commonly associated with Mustangs than Arning's, it came to be known as either. For performance applications, the optimal "drop" is about 1-3/4" which, if used on a "street" car without any changes to reposition the upper ball joint angle, will result in a very quick detachment of the ball joint's ball stud from its base... "street" applications are typically limited to 1" which most ball joints can tolerate (but many ball joint BOOTS can't. LOL.). Wedge-shaped shims between the ball joint and control arm (so-called "Negative Wedge" kits) can accommodate changes in excess of 1". For '65-66 models, a rearward repositioning of 1/8", as well, helps with retaining positive caster angles.

Other suspension modifications can be done to the stock configuration, such as moving the lower spring saddle (perch) outward on the control arm by 1". This accomplishes two things... it improves the "motion ratio" of the front suspension by changing the mechanical advantage of the spring, effectively increasing the spring rate, and also will raise the front ride height by around 1/2", so if done along with the "Arning Drop" the ride height won't really change at all.

"Boxing" of the control arms, by welding reinforcement plates on the open bottoms to bridge the gap between the strengthening creases, significantly increases the torsional stiffness of the control arms and prevents twisting under loads (and is really inexpensive if you own a welder).

Replacement of the lower control arm inner elastomer mount and bushing with a spherical joint allows the control arm to move freely and eliminates alignment changes, under load, due to distortion of the elastomer.

Changing or modifying the strut rods to ones with rod-ends or spherical joints allows free movement within their arc and eliminates binding at the large front bushings which, over time, work hardens the front of the rod to the point where it can crack and separate.

Lots of cheap and effective suspension mods out there without having to drop a bunch of coin on expensive aftermarket products.
 

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Great thread.

Couple more suggestions:

(1) Metal divider behind the back seat. On my '68 coupe, it stiffened up the feel of the car and removed the "creaks and groans" in the back. Inexpensive, easy to install, can be removed (if desired).

(2) Subframe connectors (welded in). Again, made a difference in the ride feel. But a bit more of a commitment in terms of $'s and (non) reversibility.
 
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