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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,
Anyone know of a MFG. of a T/S housing with an integral temp sending port for 289?
My winter project is to change the coolant, replace the T/S and got to thinking about a more accurate location for my mechanical temp gauge's sender. Thought I'd run by here, on the chance someone has recently done this.
 

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Hey guys,
Anyone know of a MFG. of a T/S housing with an integral temp sending port for 289?
My winter project is to change the coolant, replace the T/S and got to thinking about a more accurate location for my mechanical temp gauge's sender. Thought I'd run by here, on the chance someone has recently done this.
I think the accucacy will depend on whether the sender is on the engine side or the radiator side of the thermostat. The ones I've seen are on the radiator side which I don't think is ideal.
 

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He's right, the housing is on the cold side of the thermostat. The top of the intake manifold is by far more accurate.
 

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The Murray brand thermostat housing that is sold at O'Reilly has the port in it.
Once the thermostat has begun to open the temp on each side of the thermostat should equalize. If your thermostat does not have an "air bleed hole" in it you should drill one. Even a 1/8" diameter hole should allow enough water to pass through to equalize the temp even when the thermostat is closed.
 

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Thermostat housing for a '68 289-2V or 302-4V will have the bung. This is where the factory installed the DVCV. Yes, the top of the intake is the most accurate location for a temperature sender. I have seen modified water valves used or you can make a cheap replacement as below:
741865
 

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Pretty common to find thermostat housings with the port that can be used as a sender location. I agree that the location should only be used as a second choice. My EFI installation required using the primary manifold port as it's source, forcing me to relocate the factory gauge sender to the housing. I do not see a difference in the temp reading but it does delay the needle movement until the thermostat opens. I view that as a positive, as I can now verify that the stat is operating properly.
741872
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well guys, all good informative comments. I do like the comment regarding the port being on the Rad side of the T/S housing, as it detects the T/S is opening. I guess, Ideal is for it to be on the engine side. However, I cannot imagine there is going to be that big of a degree difference one side or another, once the opening begins. We are looking at a only a few minutes of it being fully opened, which to my thinking is not going to make or break an overheating situation. I do plan on drilling a weep hole of .125 in the T/S plate.
My current mechanical sender location is at the front right (driver's side) which was the location of my electrical sender. Its been moved to the rear (same side). I guess for testing purposes, if one could call it that, I could relocate the electrical sender to the T/S housing port to see the difference in response time. I will test the new T/S for it's response time to fully open. It's a 195º Stant unit.
 

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I installed a thermostat housing with additional part one year ago. My goal was to have a more accurate monitoring of the temperature without loosing the appearance of the dashboard. I installed a Autometer temperature gauge under the dashboard and connected it to the intake manifold sender. My stock gauge is connected to the sender in the thermostat housing. If I look down I see an accurate reading and my dashboard still looks stock. On the plus side, I can also see the thermostat working. The temperature at the Autometer gauge (intake) goes up first and than the dashboard gauge (thermostat housing) follows. I have drilled a hole to vent, but I doubt this has a big impact on the temperature reading when the thermostat is still closed. But I might be wrong, I just don't see the effect @awhtx describes.
I am happy with this setup and the next step is to do the same for the oil presser.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I installed a thermostat housing with additional part one year ago. My goal was to have a more accurate monitoring of the temperature without loosing the appearance of the dashboard. I installed a Autometer temperature gauge under the dashboard and connected it to the intake manifold sender. My stock gauge is connected to the sender in the thermostat housing. If I look down I see an accurate reading and my dashboard still looks stock. On the plus side, I can also see the thermostat working. The temperature at the Autometer gauge (intake) goes up first and than the dashboard gauge (thermostat housing) follows. I have drilled a hole to vent, but I doubt this has a big impact on the temperature reading when the thermostat is still closed. But I might be wrong, I just don't see the effect @awhtx describes.
I am happy with this setup and the next step is to do the same for the oil presser.
Thanks for your inout. FYI, I still run the stock 65 gauge. My mechanical gauges are located on the from right apron above the washer fluid bag. I didn't want to muck up the interior with the old school gauges dangling from below the dash. If I get a sense there is over heating from the stock gauge, I'll pull over and check the mechanical. Thanks for the comment relain to the stock gauge lagging behind the you Autometer. I too, run Autometer (Auto Gauge) units.
 

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