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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sometime this week I want to get the windshield off the Mach 1, and get all the 'hidden' spot welds on the cowl taken off. But, I have no clue where to start. How do I go about taking the windshield off? In other words, step by step instructions please. /forums/images/icons/laugh.gif *G* As always, TIA.
 

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Just start folding back the seal at the inside top and go all the way down both sides. When you get that far just start again at the top and repeat the process. Pushing GENTLY on the glass from the inside will help the seal unseat. When the glass is fairly free you can push evenly on the inside near the top and "tip" the glass up and out of the chanel. At this point be VERY careful that the glass does not flop over onto the hood. Did I say to be GENTLE in the whole process, don't try to force anything at any point. Also keep an eye on the top of the glass and make sure it is coming out evenly. Glass does bend to a point - then it breaks.....

For anyone that has a '71 or later here's a trick for you: That's a glue in windsheild and they are not easy to do without breaking the glass. The best luck I've had without breaking the glass is to cut at the seal in one place until you can get a small hole through it and then thread a guitar string through it, (a D string is good......... *G*). Then with a helper, one of you on the inside and one on the outside, you can "saw" the seal all the way around the glass and remove it. Prepare to cuss.............. it won't be fun.
 

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I would buy a new seal and just cut the old one out. It would be cheaper to replace the seal than to break the window when trying to remove it. Besides you should replace the seal when you pull the glass.
 

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Just took mine out today. My car is a 69 but I guess the same process applies. You need a molding removal tool, and windshield removal wire. I got mine at NAPA. The molding tool is sort of S shaped. Slide the point of the tool under the molding to release the molding from the clips that hold it. Slide the tool under the molding until you feel a clip and then rotate the tool spreading the molding until it releases. After all of the molding is removed you slide a piece of the wire through the glue holding the windshield in. I cut a piece about three feet long. I then cut two pieces of 3/4" dowel rod six inches long and then drilled a hole just big enough for the wire to fit through the dowel rod handles. I wrapped the wire around the handles several times and knotted it so it would not come off. Beware this wire is tough and does not bend easily. Make sure you feed the wire through the glue before knotting both ends. You will need help with the next step which is basically saw your way around the windshield cutting the glue. Do not cut into the glass. The wire can do it, so be careful. After cutting through the glue all the way around, you should be able to lift it out.
 
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I personally used a scraper blade on an X-Acto large handle. The blades are about 1/2 inch wide. From the inside I carefully scraped into the butyl to glass connection point with a small amount of mineral oil on the blade to keep the butyl from resticking to the glass. It took alot of effort but the glass came out undamaged. I think removing the chrome was a lot more work though so if you got through that this should be easy. good luck - Phil
 

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67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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I slice the rubber copletely to ribbons. Also any packing material that may be sticking to the glass. You need new windshield rubber anyway (doesn't everyone). The seal is a heck of a lot cheaper than the windshield. I use the type of knife that has 8 "snap-off" points. The blades are flexible enough to reduce the chances of cracking the glass. I get mine at Lowe's. WalMart usually has the skinnier version of these knives. I find that the small blades snap off too easily in hard rubber. A regular "utility knife" could be used, but the blades are NOT flexible.
Make sure you cut every bit of anything that might stick the glass in before you start pushing. It's best to have a helper to push it out. I like one person on each side of the car. Some people like one "pusher" in the car and one "catcher" outside the car.
I cut out about 10 pieces of various auto glass a week on average. Sometimes 3 windshields a day. Mostly late-model glued in stuff. An old Mustang windshield is a pleasure by comparison. Take it slow and careful, you should be fine.
 

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Well....if you are not going to re-use the windshield (i didn't)
clean it up before anything is done......apply masking tape to the whole thing, inside and out.......

cut the outter weather stripping overlap......and if that windshield doesn't want to come out after careful trying.....

sit in the car seat and place both feet on the center part of the windshield and kick hard......it broke, but I wasn't planning on reusing it anyway......old and pitted...

my helper caught the broken windshield...(to keep from denting the hood)

the tape helps against the broken shards of glass....

If you are to reuse the windshield, cut around the rubber gasket on the outside and have your buddy outside helping you as you push the shield gently and unfold the gasket from the headliner and body spot weld lip. I like to start on one corner then the other and then the middle.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks a TON for the replies everyone. I feel a lot better about this now. /forums/images/icons/smile.gif Wish me luck, I might start tomorrow, depending on the weather.
 
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