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I never understood how those are supposed to work. Looking at it in my head, it seems there would be 2 or 4 positions to lock the camber in rather than the full adjustability you'd have with the 67-73 round eccentric. Someone explain this to me. If it is fully adjustable, as they say, then it looks like a great way to adjust camber on a 65-66. Looks like all you'd have to do is elongate the hole for the LCA and weld the plate in. Looks like an easy job for your shop, Bill./forums/images/icons/smile.gif
 

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From what I can gather, you would have four positions you can setup, based on which hole you use and which way the plate is installed. It would be pretty handy if you can get street settings with one settings and acceptible track settings with another. I don't know if you can do it that way though.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That was my thinking, hole #1 for around town, hole #2
for the track. I guess you drill a large hole in the frame and the plate is welded over it. I'm just concerned it would turn into a major install, like lifting the engine or removing the headers to get a drill in there. And there is allways the problem of getting the holes to line up on each side of the frame. I've had my share of "exteme installs" lately just wondering what I'd be getting into....
 

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I have the vario-centric camber adjuster plates on my 1967; my observations are:
1) The plates can be turned over giving a range of 8 adjustments.
2) There is no chance the adjustment can slip, a supposed fault of the stock cam adjustment.
4) Alignment shops seem to dislike having to unbolt the plate to make small adjustments.
 

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Just to add to what G1967T posted, you do not have to drill or weld anything on this kit- it fits inside the stock adjuster bracket.
 

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You do not have to weld/etc. on 67-73 cars. Earlier cars will require the cutting/welding/drilling to make them work like the later setups. I believe the install will also negate the use of shims in the upper arms for alignment settings ... it will all be done using the lower arms.

I had the kit on my '67 prior to switching to TCP. Main reason I installed it was because the wide front tires would cause the stock adjuster to slip... I could only go 100 miles before I needed another alignment. This kit locks the lower setting in. You have 4 sides to the plates and 2 holes in each, this gives you the 8 different settings already mentioned.

It was worth every penny for me... and it allows you to make quick camber changes once you determine where you are. Don't forget the camber change will result in other changes too.
 

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I have one of these on my '65. Rotating the plate gives four different camber adjustments. Note: both front and back plate must be rotated equally. The '65/'66 doesn't have the base plates so the first thing one has to do is to weld the base plates to the car frame in the area where the LCA pivot bolt goes. To do this, the existing bracket lower curved edge is cut away to allow the base plate to fit well (base plate is big enough it does not fit on the flat surface without cutting the lower lip). Once the surface of the existing bracket is flat, the base plate is welded onto the front side/rear side of the existing brackets. The central hole in the base plate is elongated and the original hole is round. The hole in the original bracket is elongated with a grinder to make it match the base plate. Once this is done, the rotable plate front/back is inserted over the base plate in one of the four positions and the LCA is reinstalled. The alignment is then checked and if the LCA needs to be repositioned it can be by removing the pivot bolt, rotating the plate to get the camber desired. Fine adjustments to camber can still be done by shims on the UCA. What I did was to make three spacers from steel strap stock, cut to a lenght just greater than the distance between UCA mounting bolts then drill holes to match the UCA mounting bolts. I slipped these spacers over the UCA bolts while installing the UCA. In this manner you have spacers (completely surrounding the UCA bolts) instead of shims that can fall out under heavy loads. These spacers fix the position of the UCA but provide for fine camber adjustment if the Vario-Centric spacing isn't exactly what I want. One added thought...the original bracket is cut away but in welding the base plate onto the bracket it is actually stronger than it originally is/was.
 
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