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Lot's of good info here. I too want to go with the Holley Sniper on my 302 and hopefully will add an 4r70w tranny with the bauman control. I'm like Kelly, I want to travel the US with this car and don't want to deal with adjustments all the time. Plus the convenience of having OD to keep the fuel mileage in check.
 

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".......I'm like Kelly, I want to travel the US with this car and don't want to deal with adjustments all the time......"

Not trying to sway anyone away from an EFI conversion, most everyone has their mind made up one way or the other. But it has to be said that one does NOT need to be fiddling with a carb in order to make a cross country trip. History can tell you that.

Does anyone think that old granddad or grandma were rejetting the carb on their station wagon every time they changed elevation before the days of electronic fuel injection ? No they didn't touch the carb, not even once. Pre 1980, I drove Mustangs, Shelbys, Triumphs, Jaguars, and even VW Karmann Ghia's from coast to coast without even thinking about the carb. Even drove a clapped out K code up the entire Ande mountain chain from Santiago Chilie to Colombia, a journey which had more extreme elevation changes than anywhere in the USA.

There's a lot to be said for fuel injection , and for some people it makes a lot of sense. But life went on just fine before it came along, and without anyone needing to fiddle with a carb in order to cross the Rockies.

Z
 

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Well damn, Indiana Jones! I thought I was cool because I threw mud grips on the back and put concrete blocks in the trunk so I could drive up on the Appalachians back in the 70s. I’ve been duly calibrated.....
 

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here is what I did and spent

FiTech - I paid $799 (was the $999 model, had $100 rebate plus 10% summit code)
Spectra EFI 20g fuel tank, pump and sending unit ~$320 (from Rockauto w/5% off code) https://www.rockauto.com/en/moreinfo.php?pk=6404193&cc=1132489&jsn=442
Fuel lines & fittings about $150 or so:
Used my original 5/16 hard line for return
bought a new 3/8 hard line for send
Cut both at the firewall and ran braided lines up to FiTech
Total ~$1,200
Done.
Thats exactly what I did at the same time and cost other than I went with the 16G Spectra tank with the infamous back gunk that cost me a fuel pump. My first Fitech unit lost Tach signal after a few minutes while at the same time the black gunk ate the fuel pump while an improperly machined Scat crank ate the thrust bearing in the 331.
A lot of issues have been resolved since then. What I know now. I don't think you can tune a carburetor not to percolate fuel in the summer if you live in a "non attainment" area of the USA that contains a bunch of ethanol or what ever mix of crap they put in my gas in the summer. Yes, I tried every miracle carb spacer. I think if you ran a return style fuel system with an electric pump you would probably be OK with a carburetor after the electric pump recirculated past the vapor lock and re-filled the float bowls. I wish I had tried this first. To be clear, the carb was boiling the fuel out of the float bowls after shutdown on an 80 degree day making it impossible to restart. Not just the Mustang, but everything I owned with a carb at the time.
I might be too stupid to adjust a carburetor, although I got away with it back in the day, but technology marches forward. If you don't feel like changing jets and springs and want to be able to restart your car on a hot day in a non-attainment area of the country while still looking somewhat stock under the hood to the casual observer the TBI units can be a pretty good deal.

The exotic and expensive fuel lines people think they need to run to install fuel injection leave me baffled. Do what coolblue65 and I did and save a bunch of money and time.
 

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Well damn, Indiana Jones! I thought I was cool because I threw mud grips on the back and put concrete blocks in the trunk so I could drive up on the Appalachians back in the 70s. I’ve been duly calibrated.....
You were, and still are cool, and probably a lot smarter than me. You probably would've had a navigator that wasn't zonked on mushrooms the whole way. My pal was supposed to drive as much as me, but as it turned out he was incapacitated too much for that role.

As it was, we got lost 40 or 50 times thanks to the furry freak bro's sense of direction. As in, "Hey man, I don't need no stickin' maps, I navigate by the stars...."

Ahhh, youth. Bulletproof AND good looking.


Z

PS. We had planned on hitchhiking the whole way. But we spied a clapped out K code for sale after going 40 or 50 miles. Couldn't pass that up.
 

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At least with the mushrooms you weren't doing over 25 mph. Or so I've heard.
 

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At least with the mushrooms you weren't doing over 25 mph. Or so I've heard.
No working speedo, but I kept the tach to a minimum of 3,500 rpm and a maximum of 5,500. Except in towns.

I did manage to hit a burro going an estimated 60 mph. The owner of the dead beast was not laughing, and he put about 40 machete whacks into the sheet metal before I got him calmed down and paid off.

The best fun was bouncing the rear fenders off of the guardrails at 10,000 + ft elevation. And without exception , all the people we encountered treated us like royalty, that was pretty cool.


Z
 

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Must have been different shrooms! My bad.
 

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Is there some reason people go with aftermarket EFI instead of just building the OEM EFI system? There should be tons of them out there and not all that hard to get parts for or doing mods.
 

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For me, several reasons

Is there some reason people go with aftermarket EFI instead of just building the OEM EFI system? There should be tons of them out there and not all that hard to get parts for or doing mods.
Aesthetics, stock looks like a dead octopus. Doesn’t look period correct like a Sniper, etc. with a breather cover.
Simplicity, easier to put a Sniper on an plug and play, versus getting a harness from here, an ECU from there, etc.
Other, issues with Monte Carlo bar and other issues.....see “dead octopus” comment above.

But that’s just me. I haven’t pulled the Sniper trigger yet and I have a new Explorer EFI setup on the engine now on the stand. I’ll likely make it easily available to someone when I do.
 

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some carbs requires more maintenance than others. Do you like to open the hood and fuss over of the engine ? If not, keep the Autolite carb or get the Summit Autolite look-a-like. The Autolite can go years without a bit of fussing over, maybe decades. That's if you will driving the car on a regular basis. You can't just park it for months or years either. Not going to drive the car in the winter ? Then at least adde some Stabil or even better, drain the gas.


If you're not willing to do things like that, then start modernizing the car. You WILL be diluting the classic car experience, but the pure classic car experience is like drinking Tequila straight outa' the bottle.

Exhilarating, but not for everybody.


Z
I really like Z’s analogy as well. I get the EFI attraction. I really do. I mean, when Holley came out with that Terminator “Stealth” EFI that looks like a double pumper I had to literally slap my own hand away from the keyboard. I road tripped 2,000 miles last winter (more than halfway across the country) and constantly fiddling with the carb was a pain in the ***, as were cold starts below freezing, but I tell you what...it all made the trip more memorable.

Part of owning and driving a classic car (for some folks anyway), is having the WHOLE classic car experience. You don’t really see 911 guys modernizing their cars, and in my humble opinion, the Mustang is a fine enough beast to deserve that same level of reverence. I cherish the analog experience. I seek to increase the analog experience, in fact, with things like chassis and suspension stiffening, and my absolute favorite modification on ANY classic car, a mechanical secondary double pumper Holley; I know a lot of people HATE that carburetor, and they can be temperamental, but few things run as hard as a well-tuned mechanical secondary double pumper carb.

To the folks who say that EFI “doesn’t dilute the classic car experience”, I say, respectively, that you’ve forgotten what the classic car experience is...

I don’t advocate that everybody share in my same level of lunacy, and I suppose that there is certainly a place for “restomods” in this world...it’s just not in my own garage.
 

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Holley Sniper has some parts that are not user serviceable and the unit must be sent to Holley for repair. The ECU and fuel injectors fall into this category. The external sensors and IAC can be replaced with off-the-shelf parts. A few parts such as the fuel pressure regulator are available only from Holley. Holley does support their products for a long time. They still sell parts for their old Pro-Jection and Commander systems. But if the ECU fails or the fuel injectors foul, the TBI unit must be removed and sent to Holley.
 

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I dont know that I am in it for the "classic car experience" as much as I am in it for the "fun to drive, fun to work on, and is a really cool car" experience. I have a really nice, professionally built carburetor that will probably be all I ever NEED... but that doesnt stop me from wanting to scratch that "work on it" itch from time to time (although right now I would like less working and more driving).

I guess I am more of the "restomod" camp than true "classic car experience."
 

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I dont know that I am in it for the "classic car experience" as much as I am in it for the "fun to drive, fun to work on, and is a really cool car" experience. I have a really nice, professionally built carburetor that will probably be all I ever NEED... but that doesnt stop me from wanting to scratch that "work on it" itch from time to time (although right now I would like less working and more driving).

I guess I am more of the "restomod" camp than true "classic car experience."
I don’t think there’s anything wrong with that. There are people attracted to the car hobby for a wide variety of reasons, and being one of the most popular cars ever built, Mustangs have had it all done to them. I suppose the popularity of restomods is probably the only part that worries me; the idea that some day there might not be any original examples left...though that’s probably not very likely. I mean, mine isn’t a resto, so I guess it too is a “restomod”, just a different kind (resto-modify vs. rest-modernize)...though I DO have overdrive.
 

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Is there some reason people go with aftermarket EFI instead of just building the OEM EFI system? There should be tons of them out there and not all that hard to get parts for or doing mods.
Have you looked under the hood of a late model Mustang with EFI? They are bulky and ugly as s*@t. I wish Ford Racing would come out with a setup like LS7 has. Those are really nice.
 

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I've driven lots of carbureted vehicles cross country, half across the country, to the mountains, etc, and don't recall having to fool with any carburetors. At all. I always got them sorted out long before I left. Along with the rest of the vehicle. I can't picture stopping on the road and fiddling with anything I own to make it go like it's a dust bowl clunker model T in the Great Depression.
 

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I went on a small road trip around the state several years ago with the local mustang club and a couple of the old mustangs with carburetors had to stop and turn around as they couldn't make it up the pass because of carburetor issues. Not sure if they were improperly tuned or what the deal was but I was following a couple of them, they stopped at a gas station and didn't see them again. I talked with a guy later who was a friend of one of them and said they were having carb issues.

To me I'd love to have no smell when I start up the car or put it away for the night in my garage. I don't have much of a gasoline smell right now but it would be nice if it went away entirely. That as well as I'd love to not have to wait 5-10 minutes for the car to get warm, I'd love better throttle response and maybe even get a couple more mpg's or ponies along with it. One other member mentioned he gained about 50hp when he took his to get it tuned. That would always be nice. And I hear that they're just more fun and much more drivable.
 

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Most of the 70's-'80's carbureted vehicles had charcoal canisters to absorb fuel fumes and they worked quite well. For some reason no one is ever interested in retrofitting any such equipment, they just want to throw the baby out with the bathwater. So to speak.

I dated a girl once who said she kind of stuck on me because the faint lingering gas and oil odors on me reminded her of her dad, who was also a gearhead. A rare one she was though I expect.
 

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Bet money your modern EFI car has a charcoal canister on it somewhere that stifles that gasoline smell for you. (Assuming you have such a vehicle)
 
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