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Most of the 70's-'80's carbureted vehicles had charcoal canisters to absorb fuel fumes and they worked quite well. For some reason no one is ever interested in retrofitting any such equipment, they just want to throw the baby out with the bathwater. So to speak.
I’m interested, but for gas tank vent. Pretty set on the Sniper. Thinking about the old hard line vent out of the filler neck into a canister. No comment on the paint sniffing girlfriend, still processing that one....
 

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I went on a small road trip around the state several years ago with the local mustang club and a couple of the old mustangs with carburetors had to stop and turn around as they couldn't make it up the pass because of carburetor issues. Not sure if they were improperly tuned or what the deal was ........"e.
To the point, that's a case of Bad tuning that was more evident in the high altitudes.

There's too much history and current evidence that a properly tuned carb'd engine will have no problem climbing ANY mountain in the USA for us to make anything substantial of these types of incidents.

Aside from my South American adventures in a vintage Mustang, I recall driving from Norman Oklahoma to Seattle Washington in a '67 coupe with a stock 289 4V, no problems . The year was 1990, and I was pulling a little 8 foot U-haul trailer (yes, I had a trailer hitch installed). The trailer was jam packed with household goods, as well as a 1968 Honda CB-350, stuff that wouldn't fit in our big Hertz truck rental. I had no trouble going 70-75 up every mountain and pass encountered. Just like everyone else had been doing for 40 years.


People can blame carburetors for lots of issues, but not the need to re-jet merely to cross the Rockies.

Z
 

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I've driven lots of carbureted vehicles cross country, half across the country, to the mountains, etc, and don't recall having to fool with any carburetors. At all. I always got them sorted out long before I left. Along with the rest of the vehicle. I can't picture stopping on the road and fiddling with anything I own to make it go like it's a dust bowl clunker model T in the Great Depression.
To the point, that's a case of Bad tuning that was more evident in the high altitudes.

There's too much history and current evidence that a properly tuned carb'd engine will have no problem climbing ANY mountain in the USA for us to make anything substantial of these types of incidents.

Aside from my South American adventures in a vintage Mustang, I recall driving from Norman Oklahoma to Seattle Washington in a '67 coupe with a stock 289 4V, no problems . The year was 1990, and I was pulling a little 8 foot U-haul trailer (yes, I had a trailer hitch installed). The trailer was jam packed with household goods, as well as a 1968 Honda CB-350, stuff that wouldn't fit in our big Hertz truck rental. I had no trouble going 70-75 up every mountain and pass encountered. Just like everyone else had been doing for 40 years.


People can blame carburetors for lots of issues, but not the need to re-jet merely to cross the Rockies.

Z

I get a pass on the road trip anecdote. I flew out to Nebraska and bought the car, drove it over the Rockies through Denver, down to LA, and up to San Francisco. It wasn’t my tuneup, and we discovered several things that weren’t working right along the way, including broken vacuum advance and a cylinder that was way down on compression. I had to “fiddle” with it a couple of times to make it through the Rockies...mostly because it was my brand new car and I didn’t want to hurt anything.

But I still disagree with your comments slightly. This is a performance car hobby, right? I would challenge either of you to produce a state of tune that worked optimally at over 5,000 feet and at sea level (with a 65° temperature swing to boot). “Optimal” is at least a couple jet sizes apart for that elevation change. If you tune very conservatively (and if everything’s working right) you can have something that’s happy enough anywhere to get around without any serious issues, and if you’ve got a hot tuneup in Denver you should probably dial it back (richer) before you drive down to sea level. I mean, that’s why OEMs changed tuneup specs based on where the car was being sold, right? And that’s why the accelerator pump cams on the Strombergs on my Flathead have a slot marked S and a slot marked W...
 

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Well sure, you could fiddle with things if you wanted. Me, I'll put up with some high altitude lack of power when I know I'll shortly be back down in a valley. Point being that the vehicle is capable of traveling competently. Now if you drive up to Vail from Wichita and plan to spend a week it's probably worth diddling the mixtures a bit.


I drove an EFI F150 up into high altitudes once. Every few thousand feet I would give it a few seconds of full throttle. A manual way of forcing the EFI to retune itself a bit to compensate for the thinner air. And thicker air going back down of course. Only applies to vehicles with an air flow meter but no MAP sensor but a neat trick. It would eventually self-compensate but it's a more long term thing. I still have that truck and I still do a reset of the MAF that way once in a while. Yep, THAT's totally why I do those full throttle pulls. Yessir.

I totally forgot. My old cross-countried Harley has a thumbscrew on both the high and low speed mixture screws so I can and do reach down and adjust mixtures at will as I ride. I don't recall ever tweaking specifically for altitude but it hasn't been to the Rockies or Tetons, just the Ozarks and Blue Ridge.
 
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I I would challenge either of you to produce a state of tune that worked optimally at over 5,000 feet and at sea level (with a 65° temperature swing to boot). “..........."...
C'mon, give me something at least a little difficult.

To win your challenge, I'd just slap on one of my vintage Paxon superchargers. That would take all of 2 hours including time out for coffee breaks.

Period correct, and will laugh out loud at Mt. McKinley, or what ever North American mountain you have in mind.


Z


;)
 

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C'mon, give me something at least a little difficult.

To win your challenge, I'd just slap on one of my vintage Paxon superchargers. That would take all of 2 hours including time out for coffee breaks.

Period correct, and will laugh out loud at Mt. McKinley, or what ever North American mountain you have in mind.


Z


;)
Touché Mr. Z...touché.
 

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Well sure, you could fiddle with things if you wanted. Me, I'll put up with some high altitude lack of power when I know I'll shortly be back down in a valley. Point being that the vehicle is capable of traveling competently. Now if you drive up to Vail from Wichita and plan to spend a week it's probably worth diddling the mixtures a bit.


I drove an EFI F150 up into high altitudes once. Every few thousand feet I would give it a few seconds of full throttle. A manual way of forcing the EFI to retune itself a bit to compensate for the thinner air. And thicker air going back down of course. Only applies to vehicles with an air flow meter but no MAP sensor but a neat trick. It would eventually self-compensate but it's a more long term thing. I still have that truck and I still do a reset of the MAF that way once in a while. Yep, THAT's totally why I do those full throttle pulls. Yessir.

I totally forgot. My old cross-countried Harley has a thumbscrew on both the high and low speed mixture screws so I can and do reach down and adjust mixtures at will as I ride. I don't recall ever tweaking specifically for altitude but it hasn't been to the Rockies or Tetons, just the Ozarks and Blue Ridge.
FWIW, that MAF system that Ford put on those F150’s (and the version on the 5.0 HO motors), is a pretty awesome deal. I think it was state of the art when I first started playing with Mustangs in the early 90’s, and I still think my parents are lucky I never borrowed that mill in their F150 for my ‘65 coupe when they were out of town on one of their business trips.

When I got a little bit older and got my first 5.0 Mustang, it amazed me how much modification that self-learning bit could compensate for. I thought they were pretty damn cool looking back when, but looking back, I’m glad I never put one in a classic Mustang. A lot of folks did, though. And considering you can still find a beat up 88 or 89-93 Mustang complete for just over a grand (if you look hard enough), if I were going to go the whole restomod route, it’d be hard to ignore that option...
 

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I have to say I never like that 5.0 in the F150 much. The 5.8 I swapped in suits me much better. Long tube headers and true dual exhaust doesn't hurt my feelings either. :)
 

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I have to say I never like that 5.0 in the F150 much. The 5.8 I swapped in suits me much better. Long tube headers and true dual exhaust doesn't hurt my feelings either. :)
It was the first V8 vehicle I ever got to drive, so I have a soft spot for it. It was my mom’s truck, but I may have welded a Flowmaster on it one weekend when she wasn’t paying attention. That was my first speeding ticket too, right after I washed it up for Friday night. They always cut through the air a bit better when they’re clean. I’m sure I would have liked the 5.8 better too, had I been so lucky. It was probably a good thing 16 year old me didn’t get those extra cubes though.
 

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:)
Oldest grandson just turned 16. First truck is in my back yard. 1996 5.0 F150. He actually cried when we presented it him, he thought he was getting his aunt's old POS car. I believe he'd sleep in it if we let him. He's already learned the basic maintenance and spent some birthday money on a stupid loud muffler. "Well, it's YOUR truck buddy." Currently job hunting because of gas money.
 

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So what’s the verdict on brand of EFI people are going with? I have been reading through this forum and I am new to the site, but I have a friend with two cars on FItech. He swears they are good. And what about your tank of choice? Thanks in advance. Look to enjoy reading through your forum.
Anthony
 

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After endless research you'll find a bajillion people telling you why theirs is the best and why the others suck basically... Every brand... Seems to me it's basically what's important to you? Do you want a cool flashy controller? Do you want simple and just runs good? Do you want plug and play controls your timing and everything? Does customer service matter to you? All of those seem to be what differentiates the kits on the market these days.

I went with the MSD Atomic setup on mine. I have it setup with their distributor and ignition box as well and it's controlling my timing. Had some growing pains getting it to run initially but it actually ended up coming down to my intake. I had a dual plane intake and it didn't like that. Seems like most of the brands don't like that though, not just the MSD. I put a 1/2" spacer between the throttle body and the intake that I cut the center out of and that ended up curing all my complaints. Now the car simply runs, throttle response is exceptional. It fires up by cranking the key, no need to touch the gas peddle or anything and simply runs and idles smooth. Yes there's an additional external box and the computer isn't color and touchscreen with gadgets... But those things didn't matter to me. I pop my hood and it's either ford or MSD components across the board and it all plugged together and works together.

All that said, I did like what I saw with the FiTech and the Holly as well... I can only speak for the one I bought though. No complaints and it does what it claims. It runs great! Was easy to install too, hardest part was plumbing the fuel system in all honesty.

I'm running a Tanks Inc setup with the internal pump. I grabbed the '70 tank for the increased capacity. I'm using their pump and everything with an Aeromotive regulator. My only complaint is that the pump is LOUD even in the tank. I've emailed back and forth with them as to if that was right. I spent 3 weeks going back and forth trouble shooting it trying to make it quiet and never had any luck. Been daily driving it since May basically and no issues though so whatever. I actually carry a spare pump with me and it's easy to swap road side if I ever had to... I just turn the stereo up now so I don't have to listen to the pump...
 

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I have the Holley Sniper EFI on a 289 with generic aluminum 4 barrel intake and 302 heads. Cold start is fantastic. It's probably the first time in 20 years the car hasn't run excessively rich. Other perks: controls the electric fan with a ground switch and I have it controlling the timing using an HEI distributor.
 

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I have the Holley Sniper EFI on a 289 with generic aluminum 4 barrel intake and 302 heads. Cold start is fantastic. It's probably the first time in 20 years the car hasn't run excessively rich. Other perks: controls the electric fan with a ground switch and I have it controlling the timing using an HEI distributor.
This a good accomplishment. Some people have difficulty with the electronic noise associated with an HEI near the ECU and wires. And usually, they are Chevy's with the HEI even further from the Sniper ECU. And if the timing control is stable, congratulations! Did you do anything special as far as shielding wires?
 

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Discussion Starter #176
After endless research you'll find a bajillion people telling you why theirs is the best and why the others suck basically... Every brand... Seems to me it's basically what's important to you? Do you want a cool flashy controller? Do you want simple and just runs good? Do you want plug and play controls your timing and everything? Does customer service matter to you? All of those seem to be what differentiates the kits on the market these days.

I went with the MSD Atomic setup on mine. I have it setup with their distributor and ignition box as well and it's controlling my timing. Had some growing pains getting it to run initially but it actually ended up coming down to my intake. I had a dual plane intake and it didn't like that. Seems like most of the brands don't like that though, not just the MSD. I put a 1/2" spacer between the throttle body and the intake that I cut the center out of and that ended up curing all my complaints. Now the car simply runs, throttle response is exceptional. It fires up by cranking the key, no need to touch the gas peddle or anything and simply runs and idles smooth. Yes there's an additional external box and the computer isn't color and touchscreen with gadgets... But those things didn't matter to me. I pop my hood and it's either ford or MSD components across the board and it all plugged together and works together.

All that said, I did like what I saw with the FiTech and the Holly as well... I can only speak for the one I bought though. No complaints and it does what it claims. It runs great! Was easy to install too, hardest part was plumbing the fuel system in all honesty.

I'm running a Tanks Inc setup with the internal pump. I grabbed the '70 tank for the increased capacity. I'm using their pump and everything with an Aeromotive regulator. My only complaint is that the pump is LOUD even in the tank. I've emailed back and forth with them as to if that was right. I spent 3 weeks going back and forth trouble shooting it trying to make it quiet and never had any luck. Been daily driving it since May basically and no issues though so whatever. I actually carry a spare pump with me and it's easy to swap road side if I ever had to... I just turn the stereo up now so I don't have to listen to the pump...
Glad to hear you sorted out your gremlins. That's strange that the pump is loud. I have the Tanks,Inc tank and GPA4 in-tank pump and can't hear it at all.

Sent from my HTC U11 using Tapatalk
 

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Glad to hear you sorted out your gremlins. That's strange that the pump is loud. I have the Tanks,Inc tank and GPA4 in-tank pump and can't hear it at all.

Sent from my HTC U11 using Tapatalk
Yeah, the customer service was great dealing with Tanks Inc other then you kind of get the idea that they assume you must be an idiot... But I get that having lived in similar shoes previously. I ran 100% new lines back to front, all new russel fuel lines, AN fittings, Bulkhead fittings, corners were handled with 90° fittings rather than bending the fuel line and potentially kinking it. The gas flows freely 100% triple verified during the trouble shooting emails. I ran additional wires direct from the battery to the pump direct thinking maybe it wasn't getting a true 12V or I was loosing amperage in the wiring or something causing it to struggle. Still made noise...

Then I pulled a pump out of my offroad race truck and just tried it really quick and sure enough, dead quiet. I need that pump for that truck though so I can't just leave it in the mustang. LOL Basically the pump in all honesty sounds like it's cavitating/sucking air or that it's struggling. Oh, I even changed up the mount to 100% for sure verify it wasn't maybe sitting on the bottom of the tank and getting stuck to the bottom even with the pickup screen somehow. Essentially once the customer service guy at Tanks Inc realized I wasn't an idiot we tried a TON of things and it kept coming back to the pump. It runs fine though... Just is a bit un-nerving with how loud it is so I carry a spare. I ran it from Vegas to San Diego and back in early Nov problem free. Just left the stereo up loud!!! Got 23mpg on the way to san diego cruising 80mph most of the way even!!!
 

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Glad to hear you sorted out your gremlins. That's strange that the pump is loud. I have the Tanks,Inc tank and GPA4 in-tank pump and can't hear it at all.

Sent from my HTC U11 using Tapatalk
BTW, same pump I'm running... didn't mention/verify that above.

And... Nice stable of rides!!! I had to google 2012 Bentley Flying Spur Speed W12 as I didn't even know what that was. LOL Seems like the Mustang is the one in the fleet that doesn't fit the theme! LOL
 

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This a good accomplishment. Some people have difficulty with the electronic noise associated with an HEI near the ECU and wires. And usually, they are Chevy's with the HEI even further from the Sniper ECU. And if the timing control is stable, congratulations! Did you do anything special as far as shielding wires?
Didn't get any noise interfering with the Sniper controlled timing, so I didn't add any shielding. The HEI distributor is big and wouldn't of fit if I didn't have the curved Monte Carlo bar. I eve had to get an offset air filter and it's still tight. I locked out the distributor so it will signal the Sniper at about 42 degrees before each cylinder reached TDC. The sniper then controls it from there.
I basically followed what this guy did:
The wiring harness he references (https://www.speedwaymotors.com/MSD-8861-GM-HEI-Module-Bypass-Cable,64076.html) works great, but don't get the HEI manual adjustment knob. It only works with chevy which has the distributor spinning the opposite (wrong) direction.
 

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Discussion Starter #180
BTW, same pump I'm running... didn't mention/verify that above.



And... Nice stable of rides!!! I had to google 2012 Bentley Flying Spur Speed W12 as I didn't even know what that was. LOL Seems like the Mustang is the one in the fleet that doesn't fit the theme! LOL
Thank you . The Stang is secretly my favorite of thr bunch

Sent from my HTC U11 using Tapatalk
 
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