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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I posted this in the Mod & Custom forum but I don't think many people check that, so I'll post the same thing up here just in case.

Well it's been awhile in the making and I'm setting some time aside to create a thread on this, as I'll likely need tips as I proceed. The car is a 70 Mach with a 351w and an FMX trans that leaked out of every crevice possible. Below is a parts list, prices paid, and some pictures of those parts. I set out try and save money where I could in order to get a few more comforts like hydraulics. My goals for this project are to minimize the changes to the car that can't be reversed easily, such as hacking up the trans tunnel to fit the beast in there. My wife is due August 15th with our first child, so I'll be hauling balls trying to get this conversion complete.

Parts List thus far:

2004 Cobra T-56 used with 29k miles - $900
Quicktime RM-8031 Bellhousing new - $350 from Corral.net group buy
Spec Stage II SF482 kevlar clutch and pressure plate -- Slightly used (one run on dyno) -- $190 from Corral.net classifieds
Spec SF05A billet aluminum flywheel (yes I know DD negatives with lightweight flywheels) -- New in box -- $250 from Corral.net classifieds
Pro 5.0 billet shifter with Steeda Tri-Ax shifter -- Slightly used -- $75 from SVTPerformance.com classifieds
Hurst white 6spd shifter ball - $30
Cobra slip yoke used - $50
Dynotech 46.5" x 4" x 0.065" steel driveshaft used from NASCAR - $38 shipped
Mustang original clutch pedal assembly - $170 shipped
MustangSteve roller bearing kit - $40
ModernDriveline LF Master Cylinder kit - $235
McLeod 14-301 Hydraulic Throwout bearing - $349 (note that the steel retainer sleeve is NOT needed for a Cobra T56)
24" stainless hydraulic line - $39
3"x1"x1/8" rectangular tubing 4' long for the custom trans crossmember - $30
Custom motor mounts - roughly $50 See build thread here: http://forums.vintage-mustang.com/vintage-mustang-forum/612019-custom-motor-mount-build.html


For those that have to have pictures for everything:


















































Thats all for the parts list. I'm up to about $2900 for everything including miscellaneous ARP bolts and other hardware.
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
With the FMX, exhaust, headers, steering linkage, brake booster and M/C, tires removed, and car on jack stands and fully level in all directions, I am ready to bolt up the bellhousing and transmission and jack it into the tunnel. With the stock motor mounts still in place, I am getting a little over 6° at the tailshaft of the T56. The inspection cover on top of the trans is touching the trans tunnel support when this angle was measured. With the rear axle supported so that the suspension is fully loaded, I am amazingly getting 0°. This means that you would end up with 6° driveline angle with stock motor mounts and the trans touching the tunnel. You will definitely need drop motor mounts or hack up the trans tunnel with this transmission. Also, note the picture below that shows the location of the shifter and the shifter opening. Sliding the motor back will better align the shifter in the opening. You think dealing with full length headers on a car is a pain in the rear?? Try taking them and moving the engine lower and further back and then come talk to me :p



 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have since removed the stock motor mounts and installed the custom motor mounts. With the stock mounts in place, I was measuring 24" from the concrete to the oil pan bolt head nearest the mounts. I am now measuring exactly 23", so all of my measuring and drawings indeed created a full 1" drop. Sliding the motor back was a royal PIA! I thought I'd be smart and grease up the motor plates so that I could just jack up the tail of the trans and slide it all back. WRONG! I had to jack up the motor as well so that the entire motor and trans floated on two jacks, in which then I slide the motor back. A cherry picker would have accomplished the same, but I don't have one of those and this worked just as well. Initially I had planned on sliding the motor back a full 1.5". Why?? A few reasons. With the deal I got on the $40 driveshaft, it was 1.5" too short with the motor in the stock location and getting 0.75" slip yoke play. It would also give me more clearance for a better radiator fan. A minor plus is better weight distribution, although it'll only change it a few pounds or so. Plus, it'd be way to easy to leave it in the same location!!

One would think that 1.5" doesn't seem like much, but when you are moving an engine back that far it seems everything gets in the way. To start out, my car has the factory A/C. This means that the heater core tubes are close to the head and one is actually behind the head.



Another clearance issue was the power steering pump hard line that comes out the back of the pump. The further you move the engine back, the closer the oil filter gets to the shock tower. Fortunately I didn't go to that extremes but if it were a problem an oil filter relocation kit would have fixed that. I need to flip that motor mount bolt so the nut doesn't touch the filter.





Finally, one that I had not expected was the sway bar. When the wheels are suspended off the ground, the sway bar touches the crank pulley. This is the 3 sheeve pulley, so one may not run into problems with a different setup. On the ground there is plenty of clearance, but I need to consider it could cause issues if I ever go over a hill too fast and get the wheels close to coming off the ground. An aftermarket sway bar may alleviate this issue, or it could make things worse. With all factors considered, I was able to move the engine back 1.25".

Clearances check at the steering center link, steering ram, and idler arm. I will have to dimple the header for the steering box, which was dented previously for that reason but moving it back means I need to create a new dent. Exhaust clearance at the trans tunnel support is fine
When I had the exhaust installed, the collector reducers were touching the tunnel support so we had to dent the reducers as can be seen in the pic.




























With everything slid back, I then installed the steering linkage and exhaust to check for clearance issues with those. With this drastic of changes ya never know!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Next up is the transmission crossmember. For what it's worth, I found out that the stock FMX (and other Ford trans) rubber isolator bolts up perfectly to the T56!
This will make things much easier in terms of an isolator.

From another thread on here, I was asking about any aftermarket other than Lokar parking brake cable kits. As you can see, the cable end is right in the way of the xmember as well as the cable is touching the tailshaft of the trans





Early version of the xmember:





I removed the drivers side bracket for the parking brake cable and have the wooden Xmember in place. I decided against the above picture setup with a plate welded to the bottom of the 3x1 due to the X-pipe converging at this location. I'll have to open up the bottom of the 3x1 so that I can put nuts on the isolator bracket, since the bolts aren't long enough to go through the 3x1.

I'm taking these pictures on my back, so bear with me on the angles





















I have about 1/4" or slightly more clearance from the exhaust to the Xmember. Hopefully that ends up being enough.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
While messing around with the Xmember, I happen to notice that the transmission was not level (side to side). This concerned me, since I had custom motor mounts and thought I had it all correct. So I bust out my tape measure and start taking measurements. At the front left corner of the oil pan, I measure 22 7/8". At the front right corner I measure 22 13/16". Within 1/16" which could be measuring errors, so call it good. I go to the rear left corner of the oil pan and measure 22 1/8". At the rear right corner I measure 22 3/16". Again, within a 1/16" so the motor is level at the front and rear. A quick check with a level on the oil pan confirms this. At the flange of the bellhousing where the trans attaches is where it gets whacky. On the right side bottom of the flange I measure 15 1/2". On the left side I get 15 3/16". That is over 1/4" difference in about 5" of length. if this were the width of the oil pan it'd probably be well over 1". Pictures are below.














As you can see with the picture of the level, its way out of whack. The other two pictures make it harder to tell but it's obvious under the car. I sent an email to Quicktime asking them what could be the issue. Their response was:

All T56's are clocked 5 degrees counter clockwise for the fork to work in the OEM cars.

So it appears they are like this on the factory Cobra cars, so they decided to keep the same configuration. It looks kinda goofy, but oh well. It may be a week or so before I get more progress, so be patient! :p
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Now that the indexed bellhousing/transmission issue is settled, its time for some trans crossmember fabrication. Using my extremely precise wood template as shown in previous pics, I took measurements from those pieces as well as the inside distance from frame rail to frame rail and headed off to draw it up on AutoCAD. I'm a tech geek and do drafting at work sometime, so it's a bit second nature. Below are screen images of the crossmember drawn up and dimensioned, as well as a detail for the diagonal pieces in order to cut them out correctly. All other pieces are self explanatory when cutting.





 

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It looks like it is coming along nicely. Let me know if I can help in any way.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well I've been seriously slacking on posting updates so I've taken time to do so.

I forgot to post pics of the driveshaft measuring. The first pic is from center to center of the u-joints, which match my driveshaft length. Then I took a caliper and measured the yoke from the face of the yoke to the metal part of the tailhousing. I then pushed the yoke till it touched the tailshaft seal and then took another measurement. The difference of the two is between 0.75" and 1", so I'm good to go. Sorry for the upside down pics









 

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Discussion Starter #10
Now for some pics of the Xmember fabrication. A previous post showed the CAD drawing of what I was making. I used 3"x1.5"x0.125" rectangular stock. Its definitely overkill, but the 3" width worked great with the trans mount isolator and the 1.5" was the shorted height I could find. The end caps ended up being 3/8" thick steel and was planning on using 3/16" but ended up cutting the crossmember too short, so I had to use thicker end steel.

Below are the pics of the fabrication process. The first pic shows the sections laid out on cardboard, which had black lines which assisted me in getting the height correct. I then tack welded the sections and removed it from the cardboard (fire hazard
). The next few pics are with the welds cleaned up and a few final ones of it all painted up. I'm a horrible welder, so it took forever to clean up the welds. I still didn't get the joint completely filled with welds, so there are some voids. Good enough for government work!
Next up, the pedal assembly!

























 

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Discussion Starter #11
The clutch pedal that I bought was extremely rough. It was bent pretty bad, the rod hole was extremely worn, and there was a groove in the pedal shaft. I was planning on using the Mustang Steve roller pedal assembly, since it uses sealed bearings unlike the other kits that rely on the pedal shaft to be the inner race. Since my pedal shaft was worn, the other kits wouldn't work very well. So I started out by removing the factory hanger assembly, then taking the clutch bushings out using a hammer and chisel.

Here is the assembly that I got off ebay as well as a pic showing the clutch rod hole wear.









Here is the hanger assembly out of my car, since the one from ebay was a 69






Here is the parts that come with the MustangSteve roller kit





and here are a few pics of the install













Final hanger with roller bearing housings welded. I didn't bother cleaning up the welds since this was hidden.





The next step was to tackle the pedals. Since the clutch pedal was so bent, I put it in a vice and used a little muscle to straighten it out. The first pic is showing it crooked and the next pics show it corrected.









One next to the drum manual brake pedal (slightly different pad height)





So now that the clutch pedal pad location is pretty close, I then went to tackle the rod hole. I first took a Grade 8 bolt and cut a section off that didn't have threads. I then put it in the elongated hole and welded it up and ground down the welds. Below are some pics of the process.













Next up was the brake pedal pad. I had plans on removing the pad from the manual drum pedal and putting it on my power pedal, but I ended up just trimming the pad on the power pedal.








At this point the assembly was ready to be blasted and painted. Below are the final pics of the clutch pedal rod hole and the painted assembly






















Next up is the Modern Driveline master cylinder assembly
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Here is a picture of the ModernDriveline master cylinder assembly





The install is pretty straightforward. You locate the dimple in the firewall, drill a 1.375" hole for the master cylinder to go through, then index the lever arm plate and drill two mounting holes. From there, its just hooking up all the linkages. The firewall to the bottom right of the installed plate is not flat due to the steering column. It was a challenge getting the lever arm perfectly vertical to match the clutch pedal, but I did my best. Below are a few pics of the linkage setup.

















And here is a pic of the pedals hanging. I don't have the brake booster installed yet, so I can't set the clutch pedal height until then. I plan on installing the booster towards the end of the install, so the pedal assembly is finished for now.

I am waiting on a shipment from Spec because my 28oz weight was missing from the box for my flywheel. Once that gets here, I'll be doing the actual transmission installation including the flywheel and clutch. Previous installs were for mockup and clearance checks only. Fabrication is all complete, so its all install from here. I'll report back next weekend, hopefully
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Well I tackled the front half of the transmission install today. Below are the steps taken.

I first installed the pilot bearing using a bearing driver. Since it was an automatic car before, I didn't have to remove an old pilot bearing.





After the pilot bearing, I slid on the motor plate and began preparing the flywheel. I took an old Tshirt and some brake cleaner and cleaned up the friction surface of the flywheel. Regardless if it is a new or used flywheel, it is necessary to get any oil from fingers or anything that would cause clutch slippage.





I then installed the flywheel using Blue Loctite, ARP -100 - 2801 flywheel bolt kit torqued to 85 ft-lbs.





I then installed the Quicktime Bellhousing and proceeded to check it's alignment with my Mitutoyo dial indicator and starrett magnetic base. I ran into one snag, my flywheel is aluminum and aluminum is not magnetic. The friction surface is magnetic, but I was getting inconsistent readings and decided that it wasn't enough to keep the magnetic base from moving. I then removed one of the flywheel bolts and started looking around the garage for steel that would reach from one of the pressure plate bolts to the removed flywheel bolt. Ironically, a spare motor mount plate that I made was a perfect fit! So I bolted that plate up and mounted the dial indicator base to the plate. That prevented the base from moving around, and got consistent readings. I started by placing tape at the 3, 6, 9, and 12:00 positions of the bellhousing. This isn't a standard bellhousing that has a complete circle to house the transmission. It has cutouts and areas that kept throwing off my readings, so I rotated those four tape locations slightly as can be seen in the pic below.



I used a carpenters T and straightedges to ensure the points I mark on the tape are across from each other. I then proceeded to rotate the crankshaft by the dampener and check the readings on the dial indicator. At what is supposed to be the 9:00 position I set the dial to 0. Rotating to the 12:00 position I got a reading of -.005" Rotating to the 3:00 position I got -.003" Rotating to the 6:00 position I got a -.004" So to summarize, the pair of 9:00 and 3:00 resulted in a runout of 0.003". According to my research you divide that number in half and if it is less than 0.005 you are good to go and don't need offset dowels. The pair of 12:00 and 6:00 has a difference of 0.001", so that is definitely good. Since one had a reading of -0.005 and the other had -0.004", it appears the diameter of the hole is larger than that of the other location I checked. Also, I removed the dial indicator and mounted it again and got the same measurements within a thousandth. A couple pics, but forgot to snap a pic of the 12:00 measurement

The 3:00 measurement:


The 6:00 measurement:





Now that the bellhousing alignment is within spec, I removed the bellhousing and proceeded to install the clutch and pressure plate. Prior to this, I got out the brake cleaner and cleaned up the surface on the flywheel as well as the pressure plate. Using the alignment tool I held the clutch centered in place while I installed the pressure plate. I used Blue Loctite and ARP - 150 -2201 pressure plate bolts torqued to 24 ft-lbs. After torqued down, I removed the alignment tool.





After that I reinstalled the bellhousing and using the supplied Gr 8 hardware I torqued the bolts down to 45 ft-lbs.





This was the progress for the day. I'll be tackling the reverse solenoid tomorrow. There is a heavy spring inside the solenoid that I'll be swapping out with a softer spring, but still heavy enough to minimize mistakenly putting the car in reverse while doing down the freeway. I'll then get the hydraulic throwout bearing installed, and raising the transmission up into place
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Time to tackle the reverse lockout solenoid. There are a few posts on random forums about what to do with the reverse lockout solenoid. The reverse lockout solenoid is controlled by the computer that activates the solenoid when the car is traveling less than 3mph and allows easy shifting into reverse. On the T56, you have 1st, 3rd, 5th, and Reverse all forward so there is a chance that the driver could mistakenly miss 5th gear and go into reverse while traveling at higher speeds. I hooked up my shifter and tried going into reverse and it darn near took two hands to shift it into reverse. Most people hook up a momentary switch to the dash and press a button each time they want to shift into reverse. To me, that is a huge pain in the arse. Others buy a shifter knob with the button and use that for the reverse solenoid switch. Others hook the solenoid up to the brake pedal, but the only down fall is that the solenoid is activated each time you touch the brakes. There are aftermarket solutions that mimic the computer, but they run about $100. The other solutions are to completely remove the solenoid and put a pipe plug in the trans (to fill the hole), or to use a softer spring. I chose to use the softer spring, which will still not be as easy to shift into reverse but won't take two hands to do it. If I find that I'm not happy with the effort, I will put the stiffer spring back in and hook the solenoid up to the brake pedal. The softer spring is going the easy route for now and may likely change my mind. So here was the process:

Went to Menards and bought a new spring with thinner wire





I then took the solenoid apart.





Here is a comparison of the two springs





I then installed the new spring, but found that it had too many windings and was basically compressed in the installed state





Easy fix. I just stretched the spring out and then cut it in half.



New spring installed:




Solenoid all assembled





Piece of cake. I still need to install the shifter to see if it made it any easier to find reverse. Up next is the brake pedal modification, since it ended up having too much space between the clutch and brake pedal pads
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I'm not sure if anyone reads this thread but I'll post an update.

I'm actually further ahead than this post, but just update whenever I get time. I tackled bending the brake pedal. I had to bend the pedal enough so that the pad moved 1" closer to the clutch pad. Using some heat with the pedal in a vice, I was able to muscle it and bend it perfectly. The only downfall was that the pad was now crooked (due to the arm at a different angle now) when installed and was VERY noticeable. So the only thing to do was grind off the original weld and reposition. I figured that since I was already removing the pad I might as well remove the pad off the manual brake pedal and weld it onto the power brake pedal.

Here is the cut pad removed:




and here is the correct pad removed:





and finally here is it all welded up, painted, and installed. The clutch pedal is an inch or two higher than the brake pedal, which from what I've read is normal.







I also received more parts in the mail today from NPD. Notice one thing that doesn't belong? Yep, they sent the wrong clutch pad trim. I definitely am not impressed with the stainless trim on the brake pedal just by looking at it. I'm not sure if its supposed to be this way, but there is a bigger lip on the top and left side. Actually, the bigger lip looks more correct and the lower and right sides don't have enough lip. This results in a gap between the stainless and the pad.





Parts purchased were the clutch pad and trim, disc brake pad and trim, parking brake pad (trim was ok on car), 65-68 lower shift boot (cheapest cause I'll be cutting it up), shifter trim plate, parking brake return spring, clutch pedal bumper, and a parking brake cable clip that got lost somehow.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I had previously installed the hydraulic master cylinder but forgot to post about it. As shown in the first post, I'm using the McLeod hydraulic throwout bearing. PLEASE NOTE: If you have a Cobra T56 you DO NOT need the sleeve that is shown in that picture. The Cobra already has the sleeve built in, so I get about $110 refund from ModernDriveline for the sleeve. This makes the hydraulic setup a bit more reasonable IMO.

The first thing I did was measure the depth from the pressure plate fingers to the front face of the bellhousing. Using the little pin that slides out of the caliper, you can easily measure this depth:




I measured a depth of 2.30". Using that same straightedge and caliper, I measured the depth from the trans face that meets the bellhousing to the face of the throwout bearing. The bearing comes with an aluminum spacer that must be used with this transmission. Also, the inner race of the bearing with the seals that slides onto the sleeve is threaded. I think the older hydraulic bearings used shims to adjust the height. With this one, you basically slide the bearing on and turn it to adjust it out or in. Super easy! Also note that the bleeder hose must be at the top during the final depth measurement. According to the instructions, the differences between the depths measured must be a minimum of 0.100" and a maximum of 0.300". As shown in the pic below, that measurement was 2.25" which did not meet the minimum differential. I made one more revolution and ended up with a measurement of 2.13", which results in a clearance of 0.17" and is within spec!




Here is a profile of the bearing assembly:




and another picture:






After that was all done, it was just a matter of jacking the trans up and sliding it into place. That was easier said than done as mentioned in a previous post, but it was accomplished. Here are a few pics of the installed trans with the crossmember in place.




 

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Buening,
Awesome work so far! Rest assured that there's at least 1 other VMF'er reading and appreciating your hard work and posts. I hope to perform the same conversion to my 64.5 coupe and so I read intently every post and study each picture well.

I'm waiting for the video of you rowing thru the gears (all 6 of them) and seeing the big grin on your face enjoying your steed with the 6 speed in place!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks guys! I was beginning to wonder since I had only one person comment :lol:

I received my 1350 pinion yoke in the mail yesterday and it's 1" too short. I goofed and didn't realize there were different lengths. The one I ordered was the standard length one at 4", and apparently my car uses the long length one at 5" total length. So now I gotta ship it back and get a different one :(
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Here is a to-do list to help keep me on track:


  • Paint and install steering column
  • Install and bleed brake booster/MC
  • Connect hydraulic hoses and reservoir, then bleed hydraulic clutch system
  • Install parts shown in picture from NPD
  • Cut and install lower shifter boot
  • Install shifter with gaskets, leather shifter boot, chrome shifter bezel, and shifter knob
  • Finish a little bit of underhood wiring
  • Install monte carlo bar and export brace
  • Install new Taurus fan into new aluminum fan shroud and then install onto radiator
  • Install 3g alternator and upgrade wiring to battery in trunk
  • Install instrument cluster and dash pad
  • Wire up reverse lights
  • Receive Return and reorder 1350 pinion yoke and install it, along with the driveshaft
  • Lower car to ground and measure final driveline angle as well as the driveshaft angle
  • Finalize my parking brake solution and install it
  • Drain all fluids and refill
I am probably missing a few things and may add them as I remember. There is definitely light at the end of the tunnel :):) The one thing that I won't have done will be the electronic speedometer. I'll have the factory tachometer installed and will follow my wife's car to get a feel for what RPM is at the speed limit. 6th gear is pretty much untouchable until I get the gears changed in the rear. I still have the pegleg 3.00 gears, so with a combination of 0.62 6th gear ratio and 25" or so tires I'll be spinning 2000rpms at 160mph :shocked::shocked:

Most of the driving will be around town, so I'll "go with the flow" of traffic. I have plans for an Autometer gauge cluster but funds are getting tight towards the end of this conversion. I'm trying to find a deal on a good used 5" Phantom electronic speedometer. Seems to be a hard find on Ebay
 
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