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Which would be better for my 289, 4v, p/s engine??Thanks, L
 

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Napa did list an oe thermostat for 192-195, what is the reason for the higher temp reccomendation????
 

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The "ideal" thermostat is an on-going debate. Here is my *OPINION* on the question.

1. Ideally you want to get a thermostat AND a cooling system that allow your car to run at the same temperature all the time. (Not quite possible in real life - but get as close as you can.)

2. Realize that the thermostat just determines when your radiator starts trying to cool the engine via the coolant. The thermostat temperature is not *necessarily* the temperature your engine will run at (or even close to).

3. Getting a thermostat that is just a few degrees below the "steady state" temperature your cooling system can maintain is optimally so that your engine operates at the same temperature nearly all of the time. This means the wear patterns and stresses are stable and the tolerances within your engine will be both much tighter and will last longer.

For my car I run a 180 thermo, my cooling system keeps it between 180 and 185 almost all of the time - even in 100+ degree bumper to bumper "rush hour" driving conditions. So that works for me. Your engine and your cooling system may work better at 196 (the temperature Ford choose originally). A 160 is simply to cold for the engine to function properly, the wear will be accelerated at that temperature (at least that is what the websites which report engine wear and tear research claim). Or, alternatively, the thermostat will open at 160 and engine may operate there for a while, and then when the load increases the engine will fight its way up to a higher steady state temperature, thus causing more wear as there will be a much broader temperature range over which the engine actually operates.

In the end its your decision, attempt to get informed, and then decide what your priorities for the engine are.

John Harvey
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Great info, thanks, seems to make sense......
 

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Definitely not 160! The design temp is about 195. Chances are the engine will
end up at around 200 even if you use a 180. Cooler isn't better. It's the
temp difference between the radiator and the outside air that promotes heat
transfer. A low temp thermostat slows the warm up period!
 

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slim said:
Definitely not 160! The design temp is about 195. Chances are the engine will
end up at around 200 even if you use a 180. Cooler isn't better. It's the
temp difference between the radiator and the outside air that promotes heat
transfer. A low temp thermostat slows the warm up period!
Technically with a 160 you will have heat faster on a cold day.


edit: to expand on this comment, I have always been told that you do not have coolant circulating to your heater core until after the t-stat opens. I know of many people in the colder climates who actually install 160 t stats for the winters months because of this belief. The 160 will open faster so the theory is you will have warm coolant circulating to the heater core for heat inside the car faster with a 160 than with a 180 or 195
 

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PT me!
 

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As has been said 195 is the right temp. Your engine will be much happier at 195 than at 160, will last longer and will actually produce more power. Just as a sidelight I would recommend you use a Fail Safe thermostat. If your car overheats the thermostat locks in the open position which will prevent engine damage and allow you to drive to the nearest gas station or home to fix the problem.
 

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gwmats said:
Just as a sidelight I would recommend you use a Fail Safe thermostat. If your car overheats the thermostat locks in the open position which will prevent engine damage and allow you to drive to the nearest gas station or home to fix the problem.
If your car overheats, wouldn't the thermostat already be open?
 

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Not if it failed to open!
 

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The thermostat can stick shut, thus not allowing the full flow to the radiator...you don't remove enough heat from the water and it over heats.

If it over heats with the stat open, you have other problems.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Well I got the thermostat out, looks new and shiny to me..any way to tell if it's any good??I put everything together, leaving the thermo out, but didn't have any sealer.., leaked real bed[DOH!!}can I just use some permatex, or must I have the gasket???And what type of sealent shoudl i use??Thanks again....L Can I use Dex-Cool coolant, it is specific for new chevy's[orange stuff], have a couple new jugs of the stuff....
 

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daves67ss said:
The thermostat can stick shut, thus not allowing the full flow to the radiator...you don't remove enough heat from the water and it over heats.

If it over heats with the stat open, you have other problems.

Dave
Well duh! =)

But it's not clear how this other t-stat avoids that pitfall. I mean, is it not just like every other t-stat in that it has a moving part which can somehow get stuck? That's all I'm saying.
 

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Get a clear measuring cup that is microwave safe and a thermometer. Fill the cup with water. Heat the water until it gets to about 5 degrees before your thermostat is suppose to open. Drop in the thermostat and see if it does anything. Take the thermostat out and heat the water to the design temp, put the thermostat back in. If nothing happens heat the water 5 or 10 degree more (if you go to far drop in a bit of ice). Keep doing this until you figure out what temperature triggers your thermostat to open.

John Harvey
 

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The fail safe ones work in the opposite manner, most get pushed open when the temperature reaches a certain set point or is above it. Fail safes get pushed *shut* when the temperature is below the set temp. When they break they spring open.

John Harvey
 

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JSHarvey said:
The fail safe ones work in the opposite manner, most get pushed open when the temperature reaches a certain set point or is above it. Fail safes get pushed *shut* when the temperature is below the set temp. When they break they spring open.

John Harvey
As soon as I hit submit, I realized that they must work in reverse. Of course if it did break, it might not be immediately obvious that something was wrong.
 

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dodgestang said:
slim said:
Definitely not 160! The design temp is about 195. Chances are the engine will
end up at around 200 even if you use a 180. Cooler isn't better. It's the
temp difference between the radiator and the outside air that promotes heat
transfer. A low temp thermostat slows the warm up period!
Technically with a 160 you will have heat faster on a cold day.


edit: to expand on this comment, I have always been told that you do not have coolant circulating to your heater core until after the t-stat opens. I know of many people in the colder climates who actually install 160 t stats for the winters months because of this belief. The 160 will open faster so the theory is you will have warm coolant circulating to the heater core for heat inside the car faster with a 160 than with a 180 or 195
Negative. It's just the opposite, the 160 will open faster and not allow the engine to reach optimal operating temp. Your heater will blow cooler air for a longer period of time before it gets warm (if at all).

Think back to the 5.0 days when dropping a 180 T-stat in would trick the computer into thinking the engine needed more warm-up time and add more fuel (thus a bit more power). I personally would not ever go below 180.
 

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lleno said:
Can I use Dex-Cool coolant, it is specific for new chevy's[orange stuff], have a couple new jugs of the stuff....
Please don't. When exposed to air, dex-cool eats things like gaskets, heads, radiators, ect. With the tanks being on top on these vintage radiators, I'd bet acheiveing an air-less system would be impossible. FWIW, every newer GM I've touched has been totally flushed and refilled with green stuff.
 

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Thanks! Seems like this topic is becomming a who's
smarter discussion! Seems to me the object is to be helpful! :eek: The water
pump by pass provides/allows flow when the thermostat is closed.
This flow allows circulation through the heater core also allows flow
to prevent local hot spots. The cars like my '46 Ford didn't have water pump by pass.
 
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