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Discussion Starter #1
There was a recent discussion of removing a snapped-off bolt.

A washer is placed over the bolt.
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A short bead is welded across the hole-
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Then the bolt is spun out, carefully…
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And the threads in the hole are cleaned up with a tap.
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These are great ways to remove a broken bolt, if you know a welder, have a welder or access to either one. I do welding but I've removed as many that way as I have with heat, a left hand drill and/or an easyout.
 

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I literally just broke one of my intake manifold bolts. It's pretty deep in there, I doubt I'll be able to get it out without at least removing the intake manifold. Sad part is, I just put the intake manifold back on and broke it when I was re torquing it after the rtv dried up. I wanna blame my torque wrench since it doesnt seem to be reading right anymore, but I was the idiot that kept going when there was obviously something wrong haha.
 

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67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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I've used the weld on a washer technique a few times on broken exhaust manifold bolts. But I also weld a nut on. Makes it a lot easier to turn. The washer helps keep from welding to the surrounding metal and is easier to keep centered versus just welding a nut on.
Most of what make the broken bolt loosen up is the heat shock from being welded on. The technique works really well on steel bolts broken in aluminum castings.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
I have used the drill technique, of course. A recent challenge was a 10-32 machine screw, broken off in a steel casting decades ago.

After drilling it out, using a few undersize drills in a drill press, I chased the threads with a 10-32 tap, and replaced the screw. I used "incorrect" Phillips head screws, because I wanted to use stainless steel.

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Grind 2 or 4 sides of the washer flat and you can get a wrench on it
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Grind 2 or 4 sides of the washer flat and you can get a wrench on it
True. After it cools, hit it with penetrating oil, such as Kroil. Wiggle it to get it started, don't just start wrenching it off, you need to work the oil into it.
 

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Axle bearings are another place for the weld trick. I pulled an axle, but the bearing was seized in the housing. I knocked the rollers out while using an expanding slide hammer, but the bearing shell was still stuck. I placed a bead of weld on the flat inner surface where the bearings rode, then hit it with a wet soggy rag. The shell literally pulled out by hand right afterword as the quick cooling shrank it. This was on a GM axle as I recall, but the principal still applies...
 

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I have used the drill technique, of course. A recent challenge was a 10-32 machine screw, broken off in a steel casting decades ago.

After drilling it out, using a few undersize drills in a drill press, I chased the threads with a 10-32 tap, and replaced the screw. I used "incorrect" Phillips head screws, because I wanted to use stainless steel.

View attachment 743504

View attachment 743506
What does that piece go to, It looks like a tank or something ?
 

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Instead of a washer just weld a nut. I used to do it multiple times a week as an industrial welder/mechanic
 
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